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7 Mitos da meditação

7 Mitos da meditação | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

Apesar da crescente popularidade da meditação equívocos existentes sobre a prática são uma barreira que impede muitas pessoas de tentar a meditação e receber seus benefícios profundos para o corpo, mente e espírito. Aqui estão sete dos mitos mais comuns de meditação.


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The BioSync Team's curator insight, February 25, 2013 5:52 PM


Myth #1: Meditation is difficult.

Myth #2: You have to quiet your mind in order to have a successful meditation practice.

Myth #3: It takes years of dedicated practice to receive any benefits from meditation.

Myth #4: Meditation is escapism.

Myth #5: I don’t have enough time to meditate.

Myth #6: Meditation is a spiritual or religious practice.

Myth #7: I’m supposed to have transcendent experiences in meditation.

Shane Davis's curator insight, March 10, 2013 3:07 AM

I have been the unwitting believer inseveral if not all of these 7 myths about meditation. They are exactly that - myths.

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What Is Meditation? Sometimes It’s About Failure!

What Is Meditation? Sometimes It’s About Failure! | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

Jerome Stone addresses one of the most common aversions to meditation -- that often we feel like failures when our minds are behaving like runaway monkeys, and we believe there should be no thought. This is a misunderstanding, as much of meditation is learning about our minds, no matter what they are doing. Excellent article!

 

Kat Tansey

www.choosingtobe.com


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The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 6, 2013 3:28 PM

Jerome Stone does a great job of providing a content rich site for both beginners and seasoned meditators.

Full Article:  http://www.mindingthebedside.com/2012/09/what-is-meditation-sometimes-its-about-failure/

Shane Davis's curator insight, March 10, 2013 1:34 AM

One key to effective meditation is to no thave any expectations of an outcome. That would be like saying if this day doesnt result in this or that I will be disappointed and consider it a bad day. Letting go of expectations actually can help you to attain a lot of waht we meditate for anyways. Believe me... this is easier said than done. But it gets easier with repitition.

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How To Meditate Without Even Trying

How To Meditate Without Even Trying | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it
This is the sad joke about human beings: We are so busy worrying whether or not we are going to be at peace in the future, we don't give ourselves the chance to be at peace in the present.

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The BioSync Team's curator insight, March 3, 2013 8:23 PM

Enroll and pay what you wish at How to Meditate

Shane Davis's curator insight, March 10, 2013 1:37 AM

Just from the start this article caught my eye because the key to living life is to live life now and focus the biggest brunt of your energy to the here and now. It is a good article

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Introduction to Mindfulness | University of Oxford Podcasts - Audio and Video Lectures

Introduction to Mindfulness | University of Oxford Podcasts - Audio and Video Lectures | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it
Professor Mark Williams introduces Mindfulness in the first of four short videos in this series.

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Research on effectiveness of Mindfulness reaches conclusion phase

Research on effectiveness of Mindfulness reaches conclusion phase | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

Research on effectiveness of Mindfulness reaches conclusion phase -- a press release is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from PhysOrg.com staff.


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Mindfulness Therapy Improves Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

Mindfulness Therapy Improves Bipolar Disorder Symptoms | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy may improve mood, emotional regulation, well-being, and functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder, according to a study published in the February issue of CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.


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Winter Riel's curator insight, May 21, 2013 9:58 AM

A new study shows that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) can help the moods of people diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder. They did a study with 12 participants who suffer from Bipolar Disorder, they all participated in MBCT and had a three week check-up. They found that the participants had better mindfulness, less depressed moods, less difficulty paying attention, and better control over their emotions.

Olivia Start's curator insight, January 12, 2014 3:36 PM

This article introduced a type of therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, that may improve the well being of those living with chronic mood disorerds. Of course there are other therapys like family therapy and CBT that are being used to treat those with bipolar disorder. However, this article states that mindfulness therapy has shown improvements in all areas of life for those who have a mood disorder. I think it would be amazing if we could find one kind of therapy that shows such improvements to give those with mood disorders hope! 

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Neural basis for benefits of meditation

Neural basis for benefits of meditation | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it
Mindfulness meditation training in awareness of present moment experience, such as body and breath sensations, prevents depression and reduces distress in chronic pain.

Via Yeshe Dorje, The BioSync Team
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Yeshe Dorje's curator insight, March 1, 2013 10:42 AM

Among the most important predictions is one that could explain how gaining control of alpha rhythms not only enhances sensory focus on a particular area of the body, but also helps people overcome persistent competing stimuli, such as depressive thoughts or chronic pain signals.

To accomplish this, the model predicts, meditators must achieve proper control over the relative timing and strength of alpha rhythms generated from two separate regions of the thalamus, called thalamic nuclei, that talk to different parts of the cortex. One alpha generator would govern the local "tuning in," for instance of sensations in a hand, while the other would govern the broader "tuning out" of other sensory or cognitive information in the cortex.

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Mindfulness Can Improve Your Attention and Health | Scientific American

Mindfulness Can Improve Your Attention and Health | Scientific American | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

"The opposite of a wandering mind is a mindful one. Mindfulness is a mental mode of being engaged in the present moment without evaluating or emotionally reacting to it. Hundreds of articles lay out evidence showing that training to become more mindful reduces psychological stress and improves both mental and physical health, alleviating depression, anxiety, loneliness and chronic pain...Mindfulness training works, at least in part, by strengthening the brain's ability to pay attention."


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Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, March 1, 2013 11:42 AM

University of Miami cognitive neuroscientist Amishi Jha reviews the evidence for the beneficial effects of mindfulness training and the importance of attention regulation in mediating those effects. It's a great overview of some of the key studies so far, including some very recent and compelling research.

 

My only quibble is with her assertion that these effects are *specific* to mindfulness training. For example, she writes, "mindfulness training uniquely builds the ability to direct attention at will through the sea of internal and external stimulation while also allowing for greater awareness of what is happening in the moment." We don't actually know that yet. We have insufficient data to so decisively reject the notion that other contemplative practices might not have similar effects - comparative studies are woefully lacking at this point.

 

Similarly, she writes, "Many sages, beginning with Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, have advocated repeated engagement in these forms of meditation as a route to increasing mindfulness in daily life." The Buddha certainly packaged mindfulness training in a novel religious and psychological framework, but I would not go so far as to claim that mindfulness training *began* with this historical figure. One of the most interesting questions for contemplative science to address in the future concerns which mechanisms, if any, are truly unique to Buddhist-inspired mindfulness practices. The jury is still out. 

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Pain Attenuation through Mindfulness is Associated with Decreased Cognitive Control and Increased Sensory Processing in the Brain | Cerebral Cortex

Pain Attenuation through Mindfulness is Associated with Decreased Cognitive Control and Increased Sensory Processing in the Brain | Cerebral Cortex | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

Important new fMRI study from MGH researchers: "Here, we investigate the underlying brain mechanisms by which the state of mindfulness reduces pain. Mindfulness practitioners and controls received unpleasant electric stimuli in the functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner during a mindfulness and a control condition. Mindfulness practitioners, but not controls, were able to reduce pain unpleasantness by 22% and anticipatory anxiety by 29% during a mindful state. In the brain, this reduction was associated with decreased activation in the lateral prefrontal cortex and increased activation in the right posterior insula during stimulation and increased rostral anterior cingulate cortex activation during the anticipation of pain. These findings reveal a unique mechanism of pain modulation, comprising increased sensory processing and decreased cognitive control, and are in sharp contrast to established pain modulation mechanisms."


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How To Kill A Thought (In A Good Way): More On Mindfulness - Forbes

How To Kill A Thought (In A Good Way): More On Mindfulness - Forbes | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it
We all have thoughts we can’t seem to snuff out. Here’s how to outwit your brain and quiet the chatter.

Via Let's Grow Leaders, Wise Leader™, Lon Woodbury, Maisen Mosley
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Mindfulness – could it help you? | The Oxford Student

Mindfulness – could it help you? | The Oxford Student | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

An Oxford term might not strike everyone as a natural environment for the pursuit of inner peace; but in Michaelmas twenty students went through a course designed to help us find just that. With a little help, obviously, from dried fruit.


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Day-long seminar - Mindfulness & Compassion GGSC

Day-long seminar  - Mindfulness & Compassion GGSC | Mindfulness meditation Brazil | Scoop.it

This day-long seminar and live webcast will explore the conceptual, biological and practical relationship between mindfulness and compassion.

 

The goal of this conference is to explore the important connections between mindfulness and compassion by providing answers to questions such as how are they similar or distinct, how does one promote the other, which research-tested programs have been shown to boost mindfulness and/or compassion, and much more.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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