Mindfulness In Every Day Life
0 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kelly Martin Speaks
Scoop.it!

Kelly Martin Speaks: The Positive Thinking Culture Is Creating Neurotic Spiritual Seekers

Kelly Martin Speaks: The Positive Thinking Culture Is Creating Neurotic Spiritual Seekers | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it
Sick of the positive thinking bandwagon? What if not positive thinking is the better option?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kelly Martin Speaks from Unplug
Scoop.it!

Intuition: Boost Intuition with Mindfulness

Intuition: Boost Intuition with Mindfulness | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it
Boost intuition with mindfulness meditation to develop intuition, boost intuitive insight, strengthen your inner voice, and to foster calm and clarity of mind.

Via craig daniels
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kelly Martin Speaks from Mindful
Scoop.it!

Increase Productivity with 5 Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation

Increase Productivity with 5 Minutes of Mindfulness Meditation | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it
Increase productivity with Zen-like focus by using this mindfulness meditation technique & free meditation mp3. You’ll be amazed at the results in just 5 minutes

Via craig daniels
more...
craig daniels's curator insight, July 31, 2013 12:37 PM

#unplug #mindfulness

Scooped by Kelly Martin Speaks
Scoop.it!

Ruby Wax on mindfulness: How our brains drive us mad

Ruby Wax on mindfulness: How our brains drive us mad | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it
So-called ‘poster girl for mental health’, and full-on comedian Ruby Wax explains where science meets mindfulness and helps me figure out just how it could help my own mental well-being Before anyo...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kelly Martin Speaks from Designing service
Scoop.it!

7 Ways To Practice Mindfulness In The Age Of Technology

7 Ways To Practice Mindfulness In The Age Of Technology | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it
Technology is here to stay. Why not embrace it and use it to raise our levels of presence? We can do this by tuning into our breath, our feelings and bodily sensations. This lets us know how we are relating to technology in the moment.

Via ThinDifference, David Hain, Fred Zimny
more...
donhornsby's curator insight, January 16, 2013 7:10 AM

(From the article): Here are seven ways you can practice mindfulness with your technology platforms. Try these practices as an experiment to raise your own awareness. Refrain from judging yourself or being too harsh about how these practices work for you. These exercises are intended to raise awareness by simply being aware.

Create Wise Leader's comment, January 16, 2013 7:57 AM
Some great practices to help ensure our technological gadgets serve us rather than the other way round.
Annette Schmeling's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:14 PM

Technology can be an anxiety-producing energy depending on our approach. How we discipline ourselves and think about the daily onslaught of e-mail, voicemail, and text messages impacts how much we are truly connected or disconnected in our life. Mindfulness practices recommended in this article are very practical and impacts the quality of connections between people and their capacity to feel seen, heard and valued. 

Rescooped by Kelly Martin Speaks from Contemplative Science
Scoop.it!

Mindfulness Can Improve Your Attention and Health | Scientific American

Mindfulness Can Improve Your Attention and Health | Scientific American | Mindfulness In Every Day Life | Scoop.it

"The opposite of a wandering mind is a mindful one. Mindfulness is a mental mode of being engaged in the present moment without evaluating or emotionally reacting to it. Hundreds of articles lay out evidence showing that training to become more mindful reduces psychological stress and improves both mental and physical health, alleviating depression, anxiety, loneliness and chronic pain...Mindfulness training works, at least in part, by strengthening the brain's ability to pay attention."


Via Eileen Cardillo
more...
Eileen Cardillo's curator insight, March 1, 2013 11:42 AM

University of Miami cognitive neuroscientist Amishi Jha reviews the evidence for the beneficial effects of mindfulness training and the importance of attention regulation in mediating those effects. It's a great overview of some of the key studies so far, including some very recent and compelling research.

 

My only quibble is with her assertion that these effects are *specific* to mindfulness training. For example, she writes, "mindfulness training uniquely builds the ability to direct attention at will through the sea of internal and external stimulation while also allowing for greater awareness of what is happening in the moment." We don't actually know that yet. We have insufficient data to so decisively reject the notion that other contemplative practices might not have similar effects - comparative studies are woefully lacking at this point.

 

Similarly, she writes, "Many sages, beginning with Buddha Siddhartha Gautama, have advocated repeated engagement in these forms of meditation as a route to increasing mindfulness in daily life." The Buddha certainly packaged mindfulness training in a novel religious and psychological framework, but I would not go so far as to claim that mindfulness training *began* with this historical figure. One of the most interesting questions for contemplative science to address in the future concerns which mechanisms, if any, are truly unique to Buddhist-inspired mindfulness practices. The jury is still out. 

Online Therapist's curator insight, February 24, 7:45 PM

Mindfulness training helps us develop more general awareness and more acuity of awareness.