Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
Improving Self and Society
Curated by Pamir Kiciman
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Defying medical board, FDA approves painkiller that could be the next Oxycontin

Defying medical board, FDA approves painkiller that could be the next Oxycontin | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
The government agency charged with regulating medicine says it's cracking down on painkiller abuse. Maybe not.

 

Late last month, the US Food and Drug Administration made it significantly harder for doctors to prescribe Vicodin, Lortab, and other highly addictive painkillers that have killed tens of thousands of Americans over the past decade. Lawmakers praised the agency's move, but the next day, over the objections of its medical advisory board, the FDA approved Zohydro, a new drug that has 5 to 10 times more of the heroin-like opioid hydrocodone than Vicodin.

 

The FDA's advisory board, an appointed group of medical experts who evaluate drugs used in anesthesiology and surgery, voted against Zohydro 11-2 last December. As several board members noted, most opioid painkillers on the market also include acetaminophen, the main ingredient found in Tylenol, a combination that is less likely to lead to addiction. But like OxyContin, the "Hillbilly Heroin" the Drug Enforcement Agency has blamed for hundreds of deaths in a single year, Zohydro includes a high dose of its main opioid ingredient undiluted by acetaminophen. That could lead to higher rates of abuse, the FDA's medical advisers warned.

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Who Is Responsible for the Pain-Pill Epidemic?

Who Is Responsible for the Pain-Pill Epidemic? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
How did doctors, who pledge to do no harm, let the use of prescription narcotics get so out of hand?

 

By 2010, the United States, with about five per cent of the world’s population, was consuming ninety-nine per cent of the world’s hydrocodone (the narcotic in Vicodin), along with eighty per cent of the oxycodone (in Percocet and OxyContin), and sixty-five per cent of the hydromorphone (in Dilaudid).

 

As narcotics prescriptions surged, so did deaths from opioid-analgesic overdoses—from about four thousand to almost seventeen thousand. Studies have shown that patients who receive narcotics for chronic pain are less likely to recover function, and are less likely to go back to work. The potential side effects of prescription narcotics include constipation, sexual dysfunction, cognitive impairment, addiction, and overdosing. When patients receive narcotics for long periods, they can even become more sensitive to pain, a condition called hyperalgesia. (J. David Haddox, the vice-president of health policy at Purdue Pharma—the manufacturer of OxyContin—acknowledged “opioid analgesics have sometimes been associated with diminished pain relief in the face of increasing doses.”)

 

And then there are the real-life Walter Whites. I once helped care for a patient with lung cancer who wasn’t taking his narcotics, unbeknownst to his doctors. This patient’s cancer had spread to his bones and other organs, which can be incredibly painful. But he was selling his prescription narcotics to help support his wife and himself. So when given these high-dose narcotics in the hospital, he overdosed—though not fatally, fortunately.

 

What’s more, no medication reliably eliminates pain in all patients, and narcotics are no exception. And there isn’t good evidence that the prescription of narcotics to treat chronic, non-cancer pain is effective over long periods: most studies of prescription narcotics last only twelve to sixteen weeks.

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

Fascinating, essential reading! Have been an advocate of drugless pain solutions for a long time, and help many who are in the throes of sturggling with this pervasive problem.

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How A Cup Of Tea Makes You Happier, Healthier, And More Productive

How A Cup Of Tea Makes You Happier, Healthier, And More Productive | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

We've steeped ourselves in the research and the tea leaves read quite auspiciously: tea makes you more alert more relaxed and less likely to die tomorrow. These are all good things.

 

Humans have been steeping leaves in hot water for 500,000 years. Us Americans drank 79 billion servings of tea last year, amounting to 3.6 billions gallons in total.

 

So clearly, we're quite invested in the hot stuff, but what does it invest in us? New research into the relationship between nutrition and the brain is helping us to understand why tea time is such an essential part of the day--for the components of tea help us be more alert, more relaxed, and healthier over the long term.

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The Surprising Scoop on Essential Oils

The Surprising Scoop on Essential Oils | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Aromatherapy is enjoying a renaissance of sorts as its healing properties are rediscovered.

 

While people traditionally see a doctor for an illness and get a prescription drug, many others have awoken to the fact that essential oils can be used powerfully in healing and supporting the body’s emotional and physical well-being. 

 

These oils not only smell wonderful, but they actually heal at the cellular level. Essential oils are volatile liquids distilled from plants and parts such as seeds, flowers, fruit, stems, bark, roots and leaves. It may take hundreds of pounds of flowers and leaves to distill one batch of pure essential oil. They have hundreds of uses for everything from minor ailments such as a paper cut or minor burn to large ailments like cancer.

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Life's Messy; Train Your Brain to Adapt

Life's Messy; Train Your Brain to Adapt | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Margaret Moore, co-founder and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, answers all our burning questions about how to sift through the chaos of the digital age and organize our lives and minds.

 

Organization, she says, is not just about a cluttered desk. It’s about self-regulation, a skill that is developed by the pre-frontal cortex--the seat of executive function in the brain. The left pre-frontal cortex regulates your attention: it evaluates, judges, makes decisions. Modern life, with its barrage of incoming emails and phone calls and texts, taxes the pre-frontal cortex, inhibiting the brain’s ability to focus. Those who have naturally strong self-regulation can handle the overload—and those who don’t are left feeling guilty and out of control.

But the plasticity of the brain means we can all learn to be better focused and more organized.

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Melanie Greenberg's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:22 PM

We need to learn and practice self-control and Mindfulness to overcome the barrage of distractions.

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Meditation and Neurofeedback

Meditation and Neurofeedback | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

This paper discusses how machine assisted programs such as neurofeedback may help individuals develop their meditation practice more rapidly. Methods such as neurofeedback incorporate real-time feedback of electro-encephalography (EEG) activity to teach self-regulation, and may be potentially used as an aid for meditation.

 

"These technologies would be not only for people who have taken interest in these kinds of practices or people who have already established themselves in a meditative practice, but for people who are looking for new methods to train, improve and develop attention and emotion regulation. We want to emphasize that neurofeedback should be used as an aid to meditation while people perform their meditation and not as a replacement to meditation, and that while these devices may aid and assist those in their meditative practices, the goal of these practices themselves is ultimately the decrease of reliance on objects and constructs that provide support.

 

This type of research should also integrate neurophenomenological approaches that take into account first-person reports of subjective experience in conjunction with the experimental investigation of brain activity. Real time feedback of brain activity as implemented in neurofeedback may help develop new frameworks for the scientific investigation of embodied consciousness and the interactions between mind and body."

 

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The Human Condition: Struggles of Cosmic Insignificance

The Human Condition: Struggles of Cosmic Insignificance | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
The polarized mind — a reaction to the human condition and feelings of cosmic insignificance — fixates on one point of view to the utter exclusion of all others.

 

Depression is now frequently considered a biologically based disorder, rooted in an imbalance of Serotonin in the brain. Anorexia, too, is often considered a biologically and culturally based condition, stemming from an overemphasis on thinness in Western fashions. Obsessive-compulsiveness, mania, criminality, and many other forms of suffering are also considered combinations of biologically or genetically based chemical imbalances and familial or cultural influences.

 

However, thanks to the expanding insights of psychological depth research, we now have a clearer picture that what we once took to be biologically or culturally based appears to be rooted in a much thornier problem — the condition of being human. What I mean by this is that polarization in all forms appears to be based not just on a reaction against a particular family, or society, or physiology but on the shocking nature of the human condition itself, which, at its extremes, is the most daunting condition of all.

 

And what is this human condition (or “condition humane,” as Andre Malreaux put it)? It is the relationship of the human being to the groundlessness of space and time, to death, and to the most radical mystery of all, existence itself.

 

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

 

This is why developing a spiritual worldview or personal cosmology is so very crucial! And that can happen only by engaging in the practices of any of the world's wisdom traditions. Seriously embodying these practices and the universal experiences that come with them. Perennial truths are the way to breakthroughs. We can't do it through psychology alone.

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Simple Lifestyle Changes can Reverse Aging at Cellular Level

Simple Lifestyle Changes can Reverse Aging at Cellular Level | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Moderate exercise, reducing stress and eating better can increase telomere length, which scientists associate with longer, healthier lives.

 

Lifestyle changes may turn back the biological clock, and reverse aging on a cellular level, new evidence shows. In a pilot study, researchers found that men who ate a better diet, exercised moderately and led a less stressful lifestyle over a few years, had an increase in the length of their telomeres — the caps at the ends of chromosomes that protect them from deterioration. 

 

Telomeres get shorter each time cells divide. When they have shrunk to a certain length, a cell may die or stop dividing. 

 

In the study, 10 men were asked to adopt a plant-based diet, do moderate exercise and stress-reducing activities such as meditation and yoga.

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Left Brain vs. Right: It's a myth, research finds

Left Brain vs. Right: It's a myth, research finds | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Participants in a new study used both sides of their brains equally, debunking the idea of left- or right-brain dominance.

 

Popular culture would have you believe that logical, methodical and analytical people are left-brain dominant, while the creative and artistic types are right-brain dominant. Trouble is, science never really supported this notion. 

 

Now, scientists at the University of Utah have debunked the myth with an analysis of more than 1,000 brains. They found no evidence that people preferentially use their left or right brain. All of the study participants — and no doubt the scientists — were using their entire brain equally, throughout the course of the experiment.

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10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today

10 Simple, Science-Backed Ways To Be Happier Today | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Did you know that the perfect temperature for happiness is 13.9C Adjust your thermostat then check out these 10 quick tips for maximizing mirth.

 

1.  Exercise more—7 minutes might be enough
2.  Sleep more—you’ll be less sensitive to negative emotions
3.  Move closer to work--a short commute is worth more than a big house
4.  Spend time with friends and family--don’t regret it on your deathbed
5.  Go outside--happiness is maximized at 13.9°C
6.  Help others--100 hours a year is the magical number
7.  Practice smiling--it can alleviate pain
8.  Plan a trip--but don’t take one
9.  Meditate--rewire your brain for happiness
10. Practice gratitude--increase both happiness and life satisfaction



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Maria Teresa Frezet terapeuta olistica's curator insight, August 21, 2013 3:09 AM

Often, when we take steps towards happiness, it all seems so slow.... But this is the perspective of the mind, Which is different from the soul!

 

When nothing seems to happen, let's remind to ourselves that our higher self knows exactly what to do and where to go! 

 

Once we have expressed a TRUE INTENTION to be happy, we will make it!

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Meaning Is Healthier Than Happiness

Meaning Is Healthier Than Happiness | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
People who are happy but have little-to-no sense of meaning in their lives have the same gene expression patterns as people who are enduring chronic adversity.

 

Happiness may not be as good for the body as researchers thought. It might even be bad. People who are happy but have little to no sense of meaning in their lives — proverbially, simply here for the party — have the same gene expression patterns as people who are responding to and enduring chronic adversity. That is, the bodies of these happy people are preparing them for bacterial threats by activating the pro-inflammatory response. Chronic inflammation is, of course, associated with major illnesses like heart disease and various cancers.


It’s important to understand that for many people, a sense of meaning and happiness in life overlap; many people score jointly high (or jointly low) on the happiness and meaning measures in the study. But for many others, there is a dissonance — they feel that they are low on happiness and high on meaning or that their lives are very high in happiness, but low in meaning. This last group, which has the gene expression pattern associated with adversity, formed a whopping 75 percent of study participants. Only one quarter of the study participants had what the researchers call “eudaimonic predominance” — that is, their sense of meaning outpaced their feelings of happiness.


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Is Your Work Playlist Helping Or Hurting You?

Is Your Work Playlist Helping Or Hurting You? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Unfamiliar music makes you more productive--no, wait, it makes you less productive. Which one is it?

 

Depends. As SoundCloud has said, since sound is fundamental to humanity, its possibilities are infinite. One of those possibilities is helping to mitigate the distractedness of the open office--where all that yabbering pulls you away from the work you're doing. But the right music can pull you back in, as Michele Hoos observes for the Daily Muse.

 

Listening to your favorite songs is a transactionless kind of positivity--but it can have its costs.

 

She cites Your Playlist Can Change Your Life, a pop psych book that explores how music affects us. Soundwaves are potent stuff, the authors explain: After smell, music is the "fastest, most user-friendly way to influence and reset your brain networks without using an external substance."

 

Trippy. So how do we use it?

 

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

It has to be just the right kind of music. After some testing and experience with your personal proclivities, it becomes easier to find the right sounds for the job at hand. Having eclectic taste helps too.

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Andy Galicki's curator insight, October 13, 2013 10:06 PM

According to this article, the types of music that you listen to while doing something can greatly influence your productivity. Supposedly if you listen to your favorite songs while you work, you actually get less done due to the fact that you want to focus on that music as opposed to doing the work you were supposed to. On the contrary, if you listen to music that you are unfamiliar with, you are more likely to not get attached to it and so you will focus more on the task at hand.

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The Morality of Meditation

The Morality of Meditation | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Meditation is fast becoming a fashionable tool for improving your mind. With mounting scientific evidence that the practice can enhance creativity, memory and scores on standardized intelligence tests, interest in its practical benefits is growing.

 

This is all well and good, but if you stop to think about it, there’s a bit of a disconnect between the (perfectly commendable) pursuit of these benefits and the purpose for which meditation was originally intended. But does meditation work as promised? Is its originally intended effect — the reduction of suffering — empirically demonstrable?

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How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle?

How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
A new study shows that having lots of friends is linked with greater connectivity between certain brain areas.

 

Being a social butterfly just might change your brain: In people with a large network of friends and excellent social skills, certain brain regions are bigger and better connected than in people with fewer friends, a new study finds.

 

Scientists still don't understand how the brain manages human behavior in increasingly complex social situations, or what parts of the brain are linked to deviant social behavior associated with conditions like autism and schizophrenia.

 

In the study, some brain areas were enlarged and better connected in people with larger social networks. In humans, these areas were the temporal parietal junction, the anterior cingulate cortex and the rostral prefrontal cortex, which are part of a network involved in "mentalization" — the ability to attribute mental states, thoughts and beliefs to another.

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Melanie Greenberg's curator insight, November 20, 2013 12:10 AM

Secure attachment experoences lead to connected brains and perhaps larger social networks.

Annie 's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:58 PM

Friends and collegues alike, it helps to get you and your brand out and about. Networking can only strengthen your company exposure and also allow to build friendships along the way. So go out and mix and mingle this holiday season. Cheers!

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Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Mouse brains get washed with cerebrospinal fluid while they sleep. Humans may use the same process.

 

While the brain sleeps, it clears out harmful toxins, a process that may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's, researchers say.

 

During sleep, the flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain increases dramatically, washing away harmful waste proteins that build up between brain cells during waking hours, a of mice found.

 

The results appear to offer the best explanation yet of why animals and people need sleep. If this proves to be true in humans as well, it could help explain a mysterious association between sleep disorders and brain diseases, including Alzheimer's.

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Neuroscientists and the Dalai Lama Swap Insights on Meditation

Neuroscientists and the Dalai Lama Swap Insights on Meditation | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
An encounter with His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the scientific study of meditation

 

What passed between these representatives of two distinct intellectual modes of thinking about the world were facts, data—knowledge. That is, knowledge about the more than two-millennia-old Eastern tradition of investigating the mind from the inside, from an interior, subjective point of view, and the much more recent insights provided by empirical Western ways to probe the brain and its behavior using a third-person, reductionist framework. What the former brings to the table are scores of meditation techniques to develop mindfulness, concentration, insight, serenity, wisdom and, it is hoped, in the end, enlightenment. These revolve around a daily practice of quiet yet alert sitting and letting the mind settle before embarking on a specific program, such as “focused attention” or the objectless practice of generating a state of “unconditional loving-kindness and compassion.” After years of daily contemplative exercise—nothing comes easily in meditation—practitioners can achieve considerable control over their mind.

 

Twelve years of schooling, four years of college and an even longer time spent in advanced graduate training fail to familiarize our future doctors, soldiers, engineers, scientists, accountants and politicians with such techniques. Western universities do not teach methods to enable the developing or the mature mind to become quiet and to focus its considerable powers on a single object, event or train of thought. There is no introductory class on “Focusing the Mind.” And this is to our loss!

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Melanie Greenberg's curator insight, November 10, 2013 11:49 PM

We need to learn how to be present with ourselves and to tune out all the chatter.

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Compassionate Mind, Healthy Body

Compassionate Mind, Healthy Body | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Compassion research is at a tipping point: Overwhelming evidence suggests compassion is good for our health and good for the world.

 

Human suffering often inspires beautiful acts of compassion by people wishing to help relieve that suffering. What led 26.5 percent of Americans to volunteer in 2012 (according to statistics from the US Department of Labor)?

 

Traditionally, research has paid less attention to these questions than to the roots of pain, evil, and pathology. But over the past decade, this has started to change dramatically.

 

Though economists have long argued the contrary, a growing body of evidence suggests that, at our core, both animals and human beings have that “compassionate instinct.” In other words, compassion is a natural and automatic response that has ensured our survival.

 

It is not surprising that compassion is a natural tendency, since it is essential for human survival.

 

Why is compassion so important to our survival? Part of the answer may lie in its tremendous benefits for both physical and mental health and our overall well-being.

 

Although compassion appears to be a naturally evolved instinct, it sometimes helps to receive some training.

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

Absolute must-read, thorough piece on the vital place of compassion in our lives in all of its multidimensionality, with many links to further reading and citation of research studies.

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Turning Psychology Research Away From War And Towards Peace

Turning Psychology Research Away From War And Towards Peace | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

In a new review of how psychology research has illuminated the causes of war and violence, three political psychologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say this understanding can and should be used to promote peace and overturn the belief that violent conflict is inevitable.

 

Writing in the current special "peace psychology" issue of American Psychologist, lead author Bernhard Leidner, Linda Tropp and Brian Lickel of UMass Amherst's Psychology of Peace and Violence program say that if social psychology research focuses only on how to soften the negative consequences of war and violence, "it would fall far short of its potential and value for society."

 

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Your Brain on Om: The Science of Mantra

Your Brain on Om: The Science of Mantra | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

There is a vast science of sound in yoga used for increasing awareness and expanding emotional states.

 

Mantra is a Sanskrit word for "sound tool," and Om is one of myriad such mantras. Sanskrit and some other ancient languages such as Tibetan, prototypical Egyptian and ancient Hebrew evolved as complex systems of onomatopoeia, where the sounds evoke movements of energy.

 

This evocation is qualitative and subjective and is linked with interoception (inner body sensations) and emotional sense of self, both predominantly represented in the right hemisphere of the brain. Conversely, the narrative strand of sounds in which we give them meaning is done predominantly through the left hemisphere.

 

What is fascinating about mantras is that from a physics standpoint, the sounds themselves, before they are assigned meaning, will resonate in different parts of the body and mind, creating actual interactions or events.

 

Mantras are information, in the literal sense of in-forming: the creation of form, or interactions. The Sanskrit language is an information sequencing system that mimics the process of nature's repeating patterns.

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

 

Mantras are a primary way to access and have a relationship with the vibratory fabric that upholds the physical aspects of life and creation.

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How Physical Fitness May Promote School Success

How Physical Fitness May Promote School Success | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Physically fit children absorb and retain new information more effectively than children who are out of shape, a new study finds, raising timely questions about the wisdom of slashing schools’ physical education programs.

 

Parents and exercise scientists (who, not infrequently, are the same people) have known for a long time that physical activity helps young people to settle and pay attention in school or at home, with salutary effects on academic performance. A representative study, presented in May at the American College of Sports Medicine, found that fourth- and fifth-grade students who ran around and otherwise exercised vigorously for at least 10 minutes before a math test scored higher than children who had sat quietly before the exam.

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Melanie Greenberg's curator insight, October 6, 2013 2:12 AM

Exercise helps kids to focus and remember better.

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Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught?

Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
If everybody knows that test scores and grades aren’t the keys to success, how do we teach, and measure, the things that are?

 

Social-emotional learning, which is based on the idea that emotional skills are crucial to academic performance.

 

“Something we now know, from doing dozens of studies, is that emotions can either enhance or hinder your ability to learn,” Marc Brackett, a senior research scientist in psychology at Yale University, told a crowd of educators at a conference last June. “They affect our attention and our memory. If you’re very anxious about something, or agitated, how well can you focus on what’s being taught?”

 

Once a small corner of education theory, S.E.L. has gained traction in recent years, driven in part by concerns over school violence, bullying and teen suicide. But while prevention programs tend to focus on a single problem, the goal of social-emotional learning is grander: to instill a deep psychological intelligence that will help children regulate their emotions.

 

For children, Brackett notes, school is an emotional caldron: a constant stream of academic and social challenges that can generate feelings ranging from loneliness to euphoria. Educators and parents have long assumed that a child’s ability to cope with such stresses is either innate — a matter of temperament — or else acquired “along the way,” in the rough and tumble of ordinary interaction. But in practice, Brackett says, many children never develop those crucial skills. “It’s like saying that a child doesn’t need to study English because she talks with her parents at home,” Brackett told me last spring. “Emotional skills are the same. A teacher might say, ‘Calm down!’ — but how exactly do you calm down when you’re feeling anxious? Where do you learn the skills to manage those feelings?”

 

A growing number of educators and psychologists now believe that the answer to that question is in school. George Lucas’s Edutopia foundation has lobbied for the teaching of social and emotional skills for the past decade; the State of Illinois passed a bill in 2003 making “social and emotional learning” a part of school curriculums. Thousands of schools now use one of the several dozen programs, including Brackett’s own, that have been approved as “evidence-based” by the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning, a Chicago-based nonprofit. All told, there are now tens of thousands of emotional-literacy programs running in cities nationwide.

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When Empathy Hurts, Compassion Can Heal

When Empathy Hurts, Compassion Can Heal | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
A new neuroscientific study shows that compassion training can help us cope with other people's distress.

 

Empathy can be painful. Or so suggests a growing body of neuroscientific research. When we witness suffering and distress in others, our natural tendency to empathize can bring us vicarious pain.

 

Is there a better way of approaching distress in other people? A recent study, published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, suggests that we can better cope with others’ negative emotions by strengthening our own compassion skills, which the researchers define as “feeling concern for another’s suffering and desiring to enhance that individual’s welfare.”

 

“Empathy is really important for understanding others’ emotions very deeply, but there is a downside of empathy when it comes to the suffering of others,” says Olga Klimecki, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Germany and the lead author of the study. “When we share the suffering of others too much, our negative emotions increase. It carries the danger of an emotional burnout.”

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

Such an important topic and distinction. I've been teaching this to my Reiki students for years and years. I'm glad there's now research being done about it. We can help others without causing harm to ourselves! We can help and still remain functional.

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Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, August 24, 2013 12:40 AM

empathy works best when paired with compassion

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Monotasking Is The New Multitasking

Monotasking Is The New Multitasking | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

How can you get anything done when your tasks turn into competing preoccupations In this age of distraction it's all about monotasking. 

 

We all know multitasking is inefficient. A classic 2007 study of Microsoft workers found that when they responded to email or instant messaging alerts, it took them, on average, nearly 10 minutes to deal with their inboxes or messages, and another 10-15 minutes to really get back into their original tasks. That means that a mere three distractions per hour can preclude you from getting anything else done.

 

Then there’s the relationship “inefficiency” that comes from multitasking. You can spend hours rebuilding the good will torched by a single glance at your phone during an inopportune time. We know this, yet we keep doing it.

 

Fortunately, there are ways to learn to focus.

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To Guide Difficult Conversations, Try Using Compassion

To Guide Difficult Conversations, Try Using Compassion | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Cultivating an intention to reduce a colleague's suffering and to address the offending behavior as the symptom of a larger problem can create a graceful, non-confrontational way to begin a dialogue that may well result in a workable solution. By contrast, when you accuse your colleague (or friend or family member) of some nefarious intent, you put that person on the defensive, which will likely perpetuate the negative behaviors.

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Memories, Photographs, and the Human Brain

Memories, Photographs, and the Human Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Memories of our experiences connect with one another and they are the basis of who we are as individuals. Memories of our experiences are called autobiographical memories and they rely on a brain region called the hippocampus.

 

If the hippocampus were to be taken out of your brain right now, you would be stuck in time and memories of new experiences would rapidly fade away. The hippocampus functions to create a seamless story of the self.

 

It’s pretty clear that there is a connection between human memory and the photographs we take. Simply put, a photo is information about past light that we can perceive in present time. Similarly, memories are the affects of our past experiences on our present self. Photographs can serve as memory storage and, when viewed, can activate memory recall.

 

The basis of our autobiographical memory is what happened, where it happened and when it happened. Similarly, the photos we take can store information of what, where and when. In this regard, a photograph is very much like a memory of a life event. Interestingly, doctored images may be more of an accurate analogy to memory, but that’s for another day.

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

As a photographer, I enjoyed the parallels drawn here...

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