Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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Meat Is the New Tobacco

Meat Is the New Tobacco | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

When I think about the effect of animal products on human health, I'm reminded of how quickly we've done a national about face on tobacco, and I look forward to the day when we have a similar apology from someone who promoted animal products.

 

The West's three biggest killers -- heart disease, cancer, and stroke -- are linked to excessive animal product consumption, and vegetarians have much lower risks of all three. Vegetarians also have a fraction of the obesity and diabetes rates of the general population -- of course, both diseases are at epidemic levels and are only getting worse.

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How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It

How to Find Your Power—and Avoid Abusing It | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

In an adaptation from his new book, Dacher Keltner explains the secret to gaining and keeping power: focus on the good of others.


Whereas the Machiavellian approach to power assumes that individuals grab it through coercive force, strategic deception, and the undermining of others, the science finds that power is not grabbed but is given to individuals by groups.


What this means is that your ability to make a difference in the world—your power, as I define it—is shaped by what other people think of you. Your capacity to alter the state of others depends on their trust in you. Your ability to empower others depends on their willingness to be influenced by you. Your power is constructed in the judgments and actions of others. When they grant you power, they increase your ability to make their lives better—or worse.

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How to Break Your Addiction to Work

How to Break Your Addiction to Work | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
In a society “where work is considered morally worthy,” being a workaholic might not seem like a serious problem, says Mary Blair-Loy, a sociologist and the founding director of the Center for Research on Gender in the Professions at the University of California, San Diego. “We live in a culture where work demands and deserves our undivided allegiance,” she says. And that sort of devotion does have its benefits. “You feel challenged by your work; you’re engaged by it; you’re learning new things; and you have the opportunity to shape other people’s careers. It’s extremely rewarding,” she says. But when you give all your attention to work, you eventually pay a steep price, according to Stewart Friedman, professor of management at the Wharton School and author of Leading the Life You Want: Skills for Integrating Work and Life. Working long hours, taking few vacations, and never truly being “off” — because of the ubiquity of digital devices — is “harmful to your relationships, your health, and also your productivity,” he says. Here are some tips to help you overcome your addiction.
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Brain hacking: Hot-wired for happiness?

Brain hacking: Hot-wired for happiness? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Depression is already the leading cause of disability on the planet, affecting 350 million people of all ages, according to the World Health Organization. Despite its prevalence, the disorder is extremely difficult to study because it is so variable — which is why genetic research has so often failed. One psychiatrist likens it to looking for the genetic risk factors for fever.

Medication and psychotherapy remain the first-line treatments for major depression, though they help less than 40 percent of patients achieve remission of their symptoms. The state of the art in psychopharmacology remains the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, drugs such as Paxil, Prozac and Zoloft, which were first patented nearly 50 years ago. These SSRIs target the neurochemicals that carry information between neurons in the brain, but no one knows exactly how or why they work, and because the medications can’t lock in on specific neurons or regions of gray matter, they are more blunt instrument than precision tool.

That shortcoming is one major reason why scientists have shifted from neurochemicals to neurocircuits — the networks of cells that are activated every time we think, feel or move — to unravel the mysteries of depression.
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The Case For Teaching Your Kids To Meditate

The Case For Teaching Your Kids To Meditate | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

The scientifically backed way to become more mindful, more relaxed, and more engaged is to start practicing meditation. 

 

"Twenty-three percent of teens have anxiety. Children as young as 6 and 7 have learning disorders. Suicide is the third leading cause of death among teenagers—and you know all of it is stress related." Those are troubling stats, but here's a more hopeful one: In one San Francisco high school horrifyingly nicknamed "Fight School," there was a 75% decrease in suspensions after the kids were introduced to "Quiet Time."  

 

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How Two Minutes of Mindfulness Can Calm a Class and Boost Attainment

How Two Minutes of Mindfulness Can Calm a Class and Boost Attainment | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Mindfulness helps students cope with academic stress and the pressures of life outside the school gates. 

 

In recent years, medical science has discovered the extent to which mindfulness can help treat a range of mental conditions, from stress to depression. While most studies have focused on adults, new research shows mindfulness can improve the mental, emotional, social and physical health and wellbeing of young people. Incredibly, neuroscientists have found that long-term practice alters the structure and function of the brain to improve the quality of both thought and feeling.

 

It's no surprise, therefore, that teachers are becoming increasingly interested in the potential benefits of mindfulness for students.

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

Have posted similar articles here and will continue to do so, as mindful kids are the solution. (Not sure why the accompanying photo seems to be showing kids giving Reiki, which isn't dissimilar!)

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The Science of How Meditation Changes Your Brain

The Science of How Meditation Changes Your Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Practiced meditators tend to have distinct differences in eight brain areas compared with non-meditators.

 

The most dramatic difference is an increase in tissue in the anterior cingulate cortex — an area of the brain known to be involved in maintaining attention and controlling impulses. Other studies have found that meditators have thicker tissue in several other regions of the cortex implicated in attention control and body awareness. Extremely long-term meditators (in one study, Buddhist monks), meanwhile, appear to have stronger connections between various brain areas, which could further contribute to focus.

 

Interestingly, regular meditation has been associated with a reduction in the size of the right amygdala, a region of the brain linked to the processing of negative emotions, especially sadness and anxiety.

 

Some studies suggest that meditators have reduced activity in the insula — a brain region responsible for the perception of pain — which could explain why they report feeling lower levels of pain when exposed to the same painful stimuli (say, putting their hands in a bucket of ice-cold water) than non-meditators. Results in this area, though, are somewhat mixed.

 

Although the fine details of how these changes occur are still a mystery, they reflect a broader fact about the brain: a phenomenon called neuroplasticity. In general, the neural circuits that you use most are reinforced and strengthened over time, and those you don't use gradually atrophy.

 

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7 Habits That Force Your Mind to Stop Worrying

7 Habits That Force Your Mind to Stop Worrying | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Worrying can get the better of almost anybody. Work stresses, personal concerns, and sometimes even irrational thoughts can seep into your mind and interfere with your ability to concentrate on ordinary tasks. Unfortunately, stopping those worries isn't easy--there's no "off switch" that can shut your worried thoughts down. However, there are a handful of habits that, once integrated into your life, can force your worries to leave and free up your mind to focus on more positive, productive things.

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The Apothecary Spa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 3:34 PM

This is the reason I  cook! I occupy both my hands and my brain while in the kitchen. I can focus on the task and ignore everything else. It is probably the only time I can ignore anything. 

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Three Kinds of Empathy Kids Need for Success

Three Kinds of Empathy Kids Need for Success | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Empathic concern offers the foundation for what’s been called a “caring classroom,” where the teacher embodies and models kindness and concern for her students, and encourages the same attitude among the students. Such a classroom culture provides the best atmosphere for learning, both cognitively and emotionally.

 

Learning in general happens best in a warm, supportive atmosphere, in which there exists a feeling of safety, of being supported and cared about, of closeness and connection. In such a space children’s brains more readily reach the state of optimal cognitive efficiency—and of caring about others.

 

Such an atmosphere has particular importance for those children at most risk of going off track in their lives because of early experiences of deprivation, abuse, or neglect. Studies of such high-risk kids who have ended up thriving in their lives—who are resilient—find that usually the one person who turned their life around was a caring adult.

 

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How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain

How Walking in Nature Changes the Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Most of us today live in cities and spend far less time outside in green, natural spaces than people did several generations ago. City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show.

 

These developments seem to be linked to some extent, according to a growing body of research. Various studies have found that urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently been outside.

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How the Brain Changes When You Meditate

How the Brain Changes When You Meditate | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

By charting new pathways in the brain, mindfulness can change the banter inside our heads from chaotic to calm.

 

Not too long ago, most of us thought that the brain we’re born with is static—that after a certain age, the neural circuitry cards we’re dealt are the only ones we can play long-term.


Fast-forward a decade or two, and we’re beginning to see the opposite: the brain is designed to adapt constantly. World-renowned neuroscientist Richie Davidson at the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, along with this colleagues, want us to know three things:

 

1) you can train your brain to change, 2) that the change is measurable, and 3) new ways of thinking can change it for the better.

 

It’s hard to comprehend how this is possible. Practicing mindfulness is nothing like taking a pill, or another fix that acts quickly, entering our blood stream, crossing the Blood Brain Barrier if needed in order to produce an immediate sensation, or to dull one.

 

But just as we learn to play the piano through practice, the same goes for cultivating well-being and happiness. Davidson told Mindful last August that the brain keeps changing over its entire lifespan.

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Coloring books for grown-ups can ease stress and calm one’s inner child

Coloring books for grown-ups can ease stress and calm one’s inner child | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

There’s a reason the restaurant kids’ menu often comes with an outline of illustrations and a bundle of crayons. Many times, coloring inside, or somewhere in the vicinity of, the lines is all it takes to channel and calm a child’s chaotic energy. Turns out, the same thing goes for grown-ups. With her new line of coloring books, local art therapist Lacy Mucklow aims to relieve and restore weary men and women with the wonder of such focused play.

 

“We see the joy and excitement that children have when they color a book with cartoon characters that they love to see, and we tend to get away from doing things like that when we are adults, due to added responsibilities, a tight schedule, or even thinking that coloring is only for kids,” Mucklow, 39, of Springfield, Va., said in an email. And yet, “we need to schedule self-care or ‘me’ time to unwind.”

 

The books follow best-sellers in the positive psychology movement, which espouses a path to happiness through redirected thinking and “natural ways to calm yourself down.”

 

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Can you teach people to have empathy?

Can you teach people to have empathy? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Empathy is a quality that is integral to most people's lives - and yet the modern world makes it easy to lose sight of the feelings of others. But almost everyone can learn to develop this crucial personality trait.

 

Human beings are naturally primed to embrace this message. According to the latest neuroscience research, 98% of people (the exceptions include those with psychopathic tendencies) have the ability to empathise wired into their brains - an in-built capacity for stepping into the shoes of others and understanding their feelings and perspectives.

 

The problem is that most don't tap into their full empathic potential in everyday life.

 

You can easily find yourself passing by a mother struggling with a pram on some steps as you rush to a work meeting, or read about a tragic earthquake in a distant country then let it slip your mind as you click a link to check the latest football results.

 

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To Ease Pain, Reach For Your Playlist

To Ease Pain, Reach For Your Playlist | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Music can energize, soothe or relax us. And it can also help reduce pain. Researchers found that listening to a favorite song or story helped children manage pain after major surgery.

 

We all know that listening to music can soothe emotional pain, but Taylor Swift, Jay-Z and Alicia Keys can also ease physical pain, according to a study of children and teenagers who had major surgery.

 

The analgesic effects of music are well known, but most of the studies have been done with adults and most of the music has been classical. Now a recent study finds that children who choose their own music or audiobook to listen to after major surgery experience less pain.

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Mindfulness Can Improve Strategy, Too

Mindfulness Can Improve Strategy, Too | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Seventy years ago, Viktor Frankl, an Austrian psychiatrist who had just emerged from years as a prisoner at Auschwitz, shed some light on the question with a now-classic teaching. “Between stimulus and response, there is a space,” he wrote in 1946. “In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”

Mindfulness — the practice of watching one’s breath and noticing thoughts and sensations — is, at its core, a practice of cultivating this kind of space. It’s about becoming aware of how the diverse internal and external stimuli we face can provoke automatic, immediate, unthinking responses in our thoughts, emotions, and actions. As the University of Virginia’s Timothy Wilson has argued, our brains are not equipped to handle the 11-plus million bits of information arriving at any given moment. For the sake of efficiency, we tend to make new decisions based upon old frames, memories, or associations. Through mindfulness practice, a person is able to notice how the mind reacts to thoughts, sensations, and information, seeing past the old storylines and habitual patterns that unconsciously guide behavior. This creates space to deliberately choose how to speak and act. Organizations, like individuals, need this kind of space.
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10 Easy Steps for Breathing Calm Into Your Anxious Brain

10 Easy Steps for Breathing Calm Into Your Anxious Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

How meditative breathing soothes your hyper-alert brain and restores calm.


Calm is your brain’s normal default setting. It allows your physiology to run smoothly in a state of “rest and digest.” This relaxed calm gives you a sense of internal composure and emotional balance. When you’re humming along in calm, you are serene, focused, and content. And after any "survival mode" stress reaction, your brain is also wired to automatically recover this calm state.


But what if you’re feeling moderately stressed-- perhaps on edge, high strung, excitable, irritable-- with no recovery in sight? Perpetual moderate stress is a result of modern life, which can keep you in “hyper-alert mode.” 


Unfortunately, when moderate stress is perpetual, a moderate amount of stress hormones are coursing through our veins, and we aren't equipped with an automatic reset button that shifts us from hyper-alert back to calm. As a result, your brain can get stuck there, resulting in that feeling of chronic stress and anxiety.

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How To Practice Mindfulness When You Don't Have The Time

How To Practice Mindfulness When You Don't Have The Time | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Research conducted by Greg Feist of San Jose State University found that when people let their focus shift away from others around them, they're better able to engage in "metacognition," the process of thinking critically and reflectively about your own thoughts.

 

Where things get tricky, though, is figuring out what to do in order to encourage metacognitive thought in the first place. When we're routinely overwhelmed with outside noise, carving out space for unstructured daydreaming takes planning, structure.

 

Sometimes the most productive periods of contemplation come to us unawares and don't last very long—but that doesn't mean they aren't useful.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 8, 11:24 AM

I close my eyes and recite a short set of lines I have used for a number of years. It calms when things are harried.

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How Our Brains Make Us Generous

How Our Brains Make Us Generous | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

A recent series of ground-breaking neuroscience studies suggest that empathy and altruism are deeply rooted in human nature.

 

Each year, people in the United States give billions of dollars to charity. Every day, people volunteer their time to help complete strangers. Routinely, we hear of selfless acts where people put their own lives in danger to help someone else.

 

Economists and evolutionary psychologists have struggled to explain why people act in such altruistic ways. Typical explanations suggest that these behaviors involve suppressing our true, selfish nature and must instead be motivated by external factors, such as the possibility of future rewards or to avoid negative consequences, like appearing selfish to a potential love interest.

 

But what if helping others is an innate part of being human? What if it just makes us feel good to give?

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How to Foster a Healthy Relationship Between Kids and Tech

How to Foster a Healthy Relationship Between Kids and Tech | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

In her latest book, author, technology critic, and clinical psychologist Sherry Turkle's central argument is that the easy, streamlined, emotionally risk-free technologies that entertain and keep people “in touch” without human interaction have diminished our capacity for empathy and self-reflection. Turkle is not just your grouchy friend from high school who won’t use Facebook because she’s “old school,” either. Her thesis is thoroughly researched and supported by legit academic studies suggesting not only that our smart phones are turning us into a——-; they are also making us less happy.

 

Turkle looks at how the unintended consequences of constant connectivity with little human connection have sullied our interactions in the areas of work, school, and our communities; and have removed opportunities for therapeutic solitude. But no aspect of the emotional distance and dissatisfaction wrought by the lure of social media and digital communication is as bleak as Turkle’s assessment of how our lack of conversation has impacted family life.

 

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The Business Case For Adult Recess

The Business Case For Adult Recess | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

As grownups facing bulging inboxes, overflowing calendars, and a whole range of adult responsibilities, playing around isn't something we do much of, to say the least. But new research is tapping into the relationships between play, performance, and productivity—and showing us there may be real value to taking a break from our work to, well, go out and play.

 

Stuart Brown, founder of the National Institute for Play, has spent his career studying play and its positive effects on adults.

 

"During play, the brain is making sense of itself through simulation and testing," Brown writes. "Play activity is actually helping sculpt the brain. In play, we can imagine and experience situations we have never encountered before and learn from them."

 

Playing, in other words, has a direct role in creativity. "The genius of play is that, in playing, we create imaginative new cognitive combinations," Brown continues. "And in creating those novel combinations, we find what works."

 

Most complex problems adults face in life as well as work require creative solutions, even if we don't see them that way. Not only can play help jumpstart that creative problem-solving process, it can shake us out of the cognitive habits that are holding back our performance at so many other levels.

 

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7 Ways Meditation Can Actually Change The Brain

7 Ways Meditation Can Actually Change The Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

The meditation-and-the-brain research has been rolling in steadily for a number of years now, with new studies coming out just about every week to illustrate some new benefit of meditation. Or, rather, some ancient benefit that is just now being confirmed with fMRI or EEG.

 

The practice appears to have an amazing variety of neurological benefits – from changes in grey matter volume to reduced activity in the “me” centers of the brain to enhanced connectivity between brain regions. Below are some of the most exciting studies to come out in the last few years and show that meditation really does produce measurable changes in our most important organ.

 

Skeptics, of course, may ask what good are a few brain changes if the psychological effects aren’t simultaneously being illustrated? Luckily, there’s good evidence for those as well, with studies reporting that meditation helps relieve our subjective levels of anxiety and depression, and improve attention, concentration, and overall psychological well-being.

 

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How Mindfulness Could Help Teachers and Students

How Mindfulness Could Help Teachers and Students | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Many educators are introducing meditation into the classroom as a means of improving kids’ attention and emotional regulation.

 

The body of scientific research illustrating the positive effects of mindfulness training on mental health and well-being—at the level of the brain as well as at the level of behavior—grows steadily more well-established: It improves attention, reduces stress, and results in better emotional regulation and an improved capacity for compassion and empathy. Brain-imaging studies at Harvard and Mass General Hospital have shown that long-term mindfulness training can help thicken the cortical regions related to attention and sensory processing, and may offset thinning of those areas that typically comes with aging.

 

Mindfulness is widely considered effective in psychotherapy as a treatment not just for adults, but also for children and adolescents with aggression, ADHD, or mental-health problems like anxiety. (It remains to be seen whether mindfulness alone is a sufficient replacement for other therapies. In a review last year of 47 different randomized clinical trials, The Journal of the American Medical Association suggested that mindfulness training wasn’t any more effective than other types of therapy, like drugs.)

 

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How Trees Calm Us Down

How Trees Calm Us Down | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

In 1984, a researcher named Roger Ulrich noticed a curious pattern among patients who were recovering from gallbladder surgery at a suburban hospital in Pennsylvania. Those who had been given rooms overlooking a small stand of deciduous trees were being discharged almost a day sooner, on average, than those in otherwise identical rooms whose windows faced a wall. The results seemed at once obvious—of course a leafy tableau is more therapeutic than a drab brick wall—and puzzling. Whatever curative property the trees possessed, how were they casting it through a pane of glass?

 

That is the riddle that underlies a new study in the journal Scientific Reports by a team of researchers in the United States, Canada, and Australia, led by the University of Chicago psychology professor Marc Berman. The study compares two large data sets from the city of Toronto, both gathered on a block-by-block level; the first measures the distribution of green space, as determined from satellite imagery and a comprehensive list of all five hundred and thirty thousand trees planted on public land, and the second measures health, as assessed by a detailed survey of ninety-four thousand respondents. After controlling for income, education, and age, Berman and his colleagues showed that an additional ten trees on a given block corresponded to a one-per-cent increase in how healthy nearby residents felt. “To get an equivalent increase with money, you’d have to give each household in that neighborhood ten thousand dollars—or make people seven years younger,” Berman told me.

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Mark Johnson's curator insight, July 27, 2015 1:54 PM

Trees and nature do wonders for healing

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How Meditation Builds Compassion

How Meditation Builds Compassion | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Mindfulness is best known for its positive effects on practitioners’ brains and bodies. My research suggests it may also encourage compassion toward others.

 

How do you cultivate compassion? How do you ensure that at the end of the day, it’s your kindness and generosity for which you’ll be remembered? It’s a good question, for as much as we all agree that compassion is a virtue to be admired, as a society, we don’t seem to be very effective at instilling it. In fact, research by Sarah Konrath at the University of Michigan suggests we’re actually getting worse on this score.

 

Mindfulness meditation has lately been promoted for its abilities to enhance the brain and heal the body, but many of its most experienced teachers argue that its fundamental purpose involves the soul. As Trungram Gyaltrul Rinpoche, one the highest lamas in the Tibetan tradition, recently pointed out to me, meditation’s effects on memory, health, and cognitive skills, though positive, were traditionally considered secondary benefits by Buddhist sages. The primary objective of calming the mind and heightening attention and focus was to attain a form of enlightenment that would lead to a deep, abiding compassion and resulting beneficence.

 

Yet for all the emphasis meditation instructors place on kindness, solid evidence linking mindfulness to compassion has been lacking.

 

A few years ago, my research group at Northeastern University set out to change that. If meditation was indeed capable of fostering compassion—a quality this world seems at times to have in short supply—we wanted to find proof.

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How Walking in Nature Prevents Depression

How Walking in Nature Prevents Depression | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
A study finds that wild environments boost well-being by reducing obsessive, negative thoughts.

 

A group of researchers from Stanford University thought the nature effect might have something to do with reducing rumination, or as they describe it, “a maladaptive pattern of self-referential thought that is associated with heightened risk for depression and other mental illnesses.” Rumination is what happens when you get really sad, and you can’t stop thinking about your glumness and what’s causing it: the breakup, the layoff, that biting remark. Rumination shows up as increased activity in a brain region called the subgenual prefrontal cortex, a narrow band in the lower part of the brain that regulates negative emotions. If rumination continues for too long unabated, depression can set it.

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Take A Hike To Do Your Heart And Spirit Good

Take A Hike To Do Your Heart And Spirit Good | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
For many Americans, an NPR poll suggests, walking is their most consistent exercise. But how much can a moderately paced walk really help your health?

 

Researcher Church says walking has many tangible effects on health — lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and an overall lower risk of heart disease.

 

"The majority of benefits of physical activity — in this instance, walking — occur above the shoulders," he says. The walkers reaped benefits like less anxiety and fewer symptoms of depression. They also discovered something many of us yearn for: more energy.

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Juan Agramonte's curator insight, August 18, 2015 8:32 AM

"You're actually getting probably 95 percent or more of the benefits when you're walking as compared to jogging."