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Meat Is the New Tobacco

Meat Is the New Tobacco | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

When I think about the effect of animal products on human health, I'm reminded of how quickly we've done a national about face on tobacco, and I look forward to the day when we have a similar apology from someone who promoted animal products.

 

The West's three biggest killers -- heart disease, cancer, and stroke -- are linked to excessive animal product consumption, and vegetarians have much lower risks of all three. Vegetarians also have a fraction of the obesity and diabetes rates of the general population -- of course, both diseases are at epidemic levels and are only getting worse.

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Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write

Science Shows Something Surprising About People Who Love to Write | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

James W. Pennebaker has been conducting research on writing to heal for years at the University of Texas at Austin. "When people are given the opportunity to write about emotional upheavals, they often experience improved health," Pennebaker writes. "They go to the doctor less. They have changes in immune function." 

 

Why? Pennebaker believes this act of expressive writing allows people to take a step back and evaluate their lives. Instead of obsessing unhealthily over an event, they can focus on moving forward. By doing so, stress levels go down and health correspondingly goes up.

 

Pamir Kiciman's insight:

This is why I'm a big proponent of journaling. I suggest it to everyone, and have journaled myself for many years. It's the time alone with one's inner realm that counts. It makes for interesting and revealing reading later on, and makes use of our ability to self-reflect in the best way. We must communicate with ourselves!

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The Mental and Emotional Benefits of Dancing

The Mental and Emotional Benefits of Dancing | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

While you may be aware of the physical benefits of dancing, perhaps you didn’t know that it has an even more beneficial effect on your brain.

 

We have been dancing since prehistoric times, as a form of expression, celebration, or ritual. Dancing in a social setting causes the release of endorphins – the chemical in the brain that reduces stress and pain – resulting in a feeling of well being similar to what is known as “runners’ high.”

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You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things

You Should Spend Money on Experiences, Not Things | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Anticipation of a new experience is the best part, new data shows.

 

All of the studies indicated that anticipation of an experience is more exciting and pleasant than the anticipation of a material purchase — regardless of the price of the purchase.


One reason the research is important to society is that it “suggests that overall well-being can be advanced by providing an infrastructure that affords experiences—such as parks, trails, beaches—as much as it does material consumption."

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The New Habit Challenge: Take Daily Walking Breaks To Refocus

The New Habit Challenge: Take Daily Walking Breaks To Refocus | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

If you want to boost your productivity, focus, creativity, or sanity, you need to leave your desk and take a walk.

 

Research published in Diabetologia medical journal shows that the average adult spends 50% to 70% of his time sitting. Today we live in a world where most working professionals suffer from what the scientific community calls the sitting disease, and research shows that the longer you sit, the more likely you are to develop heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity.

 

In addition to staying healthy, there are so many other good reasons to get up and move around that this advice is hard to ignore.

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4 Ways To Retrain Your Brain To Handle Information Overload

4 Ways To Retrain Your Brain To Handle Information Overload | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Psychologist and behavioral neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, author of the upcoming book The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload, says information overload creates daily challenges for our brains, causing us to feel mentally exhausted before the day's end.

 

“Our brains are equipped to deal with the world the way it was many thousands of years ago when we were hunter-gatherers," says Levitin. "Back then the amount of information that was coming at us was much less and it came at us much more slowly.”

 

The pace at which we’re exposed to information today is overwhelming to our brains, which haven’t adapted fast enough to easily separate relevant data from the irrelevant at the speed we’re asking it to. As a result, our brains become easily fatigued, and we become more forgetful. By using principles of neuroscience, Levitin says we can regain control over our brains by organizing information in a way that optimizes our brain’s capacity.

 

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Talent vs. Practice: Why Are We Still Debating This?

Talent vs. Practice: Why Are We Still Debating This? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
The development of high achievement involves a complex interaction of many personal and environmental variables that feed off each other in non-linear, mutually reinforcing, and nuanced ways.
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Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain

Unpacking the Science: How Playing Music Changes the Learning Brain | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Researchers in the fairly new field of music neuroscience are finding that kids who learn to play a musical instrument also develop important skills related to literacy, math and mental focus.

 

Ani Patel, an associate professor of psychology at Tufts University and the author of “Music, Language, and the Brain,” says that while listening to music can be relaxing and contemplative, the idea that simply plugging in your iPod is going to make you more intelligent doesn’t quite hold up to scientific scrutiny.

 

“On the other hand,” Patel says, “there’s now a growing body of work that suggests that actually learning to play a musical instrument does have impacts on other abilities.” These include speech perception, the ability to understand emotions in the voice and the ability to handle multiple tasks simultaneously.

 

Patel says this is a relatively new field of scientific study.

“The whole field of music neuroscience really began to take off around 2000,” he says. “These studies where we take people, often children, and give them training in music and then measure how their cognition changes and how their brain changes both in terms of its processing [and] its structure, are very few and still just emerging.”

 

Patel says that music neuroscience, which draws on cognitive science, music education and neuroscience, can help answer basic questions about the workings of the human brain.

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Deb Bailey's curator insight, July 25, 3:05 PM

I always listen to music when writing. It helps me to create and to stay focused.

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20 Minutes of Yoga Stimulates Brain Function Immediately After

20 Minutes of Yoga Stimulates Brain Function Immediately After | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Researchers report that a single, 20-minute session of Hatha yoga significantly improved participants’ speed and accuracy on tests of working memory and inhibitory control, two measures of brain function associated with the ability to maintain focus and take in, retain and use new information. Participants performed significantly better immediately after the yoga practice than after moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise for the same amount of time.

 

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Laugh More, Live Longer

Laugh More, Live Longer | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

How your sense of humor can improve your health, get you pregnant, and even save your life.

 

Laughter is the best medicine, or so the cliché goes. Actually, given the choice between laughter and, say, penicillin or chemotherapy, you’re probably better off choosing one of the latter. Still, a great deal of research shows that humor is extraordinarily therapeutic, mentally and physically.

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The Science Of Brainstorming

The Science Of Brainstorming | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Research continues to show that our hunt for the eureka moment may be in vain. The most recent example comes from Joel Chan and Christian Schunn of the University of Pittsburgh, who sought to understand how "thought A led to thought B that led to breakthrough C."

 

Instead, creativity is a series of small steps. "Idea A spurs a new but closely related thought, which prompts another incremental step, and the chain of little mental advances sometimes eventually ends with an innovative idea in a group setting," they say. They also found that analogies helped lead from one idea to the next.

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This Is Your Brain on Writing

This Is Your Brain on Writing | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

For the first time, neuroscientists have used fMRI scanners to track the brain activity of both experienced and novice writers as they sat down — or, in this case, lay down — to turn out a piece of fiction.

 

The researchers, led by Martin Lotze of the University of Greifswald in Germany, observed a broad network of regions in the brain working together as people produced their stories. But there were notable differences between the two groups of subjects. The inner workings of the professionally trained writers in the bunch, the scientists argue, showed some similarities to people who are skilled at other complex actions, like music or sports.

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Brain Signals Link Physical Fitness to Better Language Skills in Children

Brain Signals Link Physical Fitness to Better Language Skills in Children | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Children who are physically fit have faster and more robust neuro-electrical brain responses during reading than their less-fit peers, researchers report.

 

These differences correspond with better language skills in the children who are more fit, and occur whether they’re reading straightforward sentences or sentences that contain errors of grammar or syntax.

The new findings, reported in the journal Brain and Cognition, do not prove that higher fitness directly influences the changes seen in the electrical activity of the brain, the researchers say, but offer a potential mechanism to explain why fitness correlates so closely with better cognitive performance on a variety of tasks.

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Learning to Write by Hand Improves Motor Skills, Memory and Creativity

Learning to Write by Hand Improves Motor Skills, Memory and Creativity | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Even as the emphasis shifts to the keyboard, experts say that .

 

Does handwriting matter?

Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard.

 

But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. New evidence suggests that the links between handwriting and broader educational development run deep.

Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. In other words, it’s not just what we write that matters — but how.

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Music Helps Kids' Brains Process Language

Music Helps Kids' Brains Process Language | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Musical training doesn't just improve your ear for music — it also helps your ear for speech. That's the takeaway from an unusual new study published in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers found that kids who took music lessons for two years didn't just get better at playing the trombone or violin; they found that playing music also helped kids' brains process language.

 

The brain depends on neurons. Whenever we take in new information — through our ears, eyes or skin — those neurons talk to each other by firing off electrical pulses. We call these brainwaves. With scalp electrodes, Kraus and her team can both see and hear these brainwaves.

 

Using some relatively new, expensive and complicated technology, Kraus can also break these brainwaves down into their component parts — to better understand how kids process not only music but speech, too. That's because the two aren't that different. They have three common denominators — pitch, timing and timbre — and the brain uses the same circuitry to make sense of them all.

 

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How To Live In The Moment And Get Work Done At The Same Time

How To Live In The Moment And Get Work Done At The Same Time | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it
Clearing your mind and living in the moment isn't about putting productivity on hold. You can be more profitable with less brain clutter.

 

A stretched-thin, stressed-out workplace is not the workplace of the future. It falls on business managers to change this culture and promote focus and compassion--a concept making the rounds in workplace circles known as “mindfulness.” This is the technique of tuning out the noise and focusing deliberately on what is important.

 

Studies have found that mindfulness at work can increase engagement, productivity, innovation, and measurable business results.

 

Focus, well-being, happiness, and compassion are skills that complement executive behaviors and can be learned, practiced, and mastered.

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How To Rewire Your Brain For Greater Happiness

How To Rewire Your Brain For Greater Happiness | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could hack into our own brains and rewire them to be happier?

 

Science has shown we actually can thanks to a phenomenon called experience-dependent neuroplasticity. "It’s a fancy term to say the brain learns from our experiences," says Rick Hanson, neuropsychologist and author of the book Hardwiring Happiness. "As we understand better and better how this brain works, it gives us more power to change our mind for the better."

 

Understanding how our brains function can help us better control them.

 

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Is Effective Leadership Simply A Matter Of Combining The Gender Stereotypes?

Is Effective Leadership Simply A Matter Of Combining The Gender Stereotypes? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Grounded leaders are able to do away with traditional leadership stereotypes based in gender roles.

 

Sure, there are differences between men and women. But I would argue that not all men exhibit what we’ve come to acknowledge as male leadership, and not all women exhibit what we’ve come to see as female leadership.

 

A whole new group of strong, competitive, and powerful women, and evolved, collaborative, and humane men walk the hallways of organizations every day across industries, sectors, and countries. And they come from every generation.

 

If we look back 20 years and reflect on the evolution of both men and women, we can see that both “male leaders” and “female leaders” had a piece of the solution necessary for today's workplace. Each brought a specific strength and vulnerability to our current understanding of great leadership.ful women, and evolved, collaborative, and humane men walk the hallways of organizations every day across industries, sectors, and countries. And they come from every generation.

 

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The Easy Way to Meditate

The Easy Way to Meditate | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Research says meditation can unlock our most creative ideas -- if sitting still and quiet doesn't stress you out in the first place. Yet the word meditation itself also has a unique power to freak people out.  For some, the thought of sitting still and quiet in a room without even the ping of a Smartphone is enough to ratchet up the stress level and suppress any creative thought other than how to benefit from meditation without actually meditating.


I think it’s because we make too much of it. The first few months I meditated I either hyperventilated, while paying attention to my breath, or obsessed as to whether I was meditating correctly.


I also mentally thumbed through my day planner thinking of the stuff I should have been doing. But eventually,  I realized meditation actually made me more productive and less of a worry wart.


And, like the studies suggest, I’ve rarely meditated without having some grand idea or solution emerge after the fact. We have so much background noise in our daily routine that it’s nearly impossible to notice the new and innovative ideas we have in the first place. 

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Want Happiness? Science Says You Should Stop Looking for It

Want Happiness? Science Says You Should Stop Looking for It | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

What if searching for happiness actually prevents us from finding it? There’s reason to believe that the quest for happiness might be a recipe for misery.

 

In a series of new studies led by the psychologist Iris Mauss, the more value people placed on happiness, the less happy they became.

 

When we want to be happy, we look for strong positive emotions like joy, elation, enthusiasm, and excitement. Unfortunately, research shows that this isn’t the best path to happiness. Research led by the psychologist Ed Diener reveals that happiness is driven by the frequency, not the intensity, of positive emotions. When we aim for intense positive emotions, we evaluate our experiences against a higher standard, which makes it easier to be disappointed.

 

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Rewiring Your Emotions

Rewiring Your Emotions | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

"Meditation gives you the wherewithal to pause, observe how easily the mind can exaggerate the severity of a setback, note that it as an interesting mental process, and resist getting drawn into the abyss."

 

— Richard Davidson

 

The brain’s emotional circuits are actually connected to its thinking circuits, which are much more accessible to our conscious volition. That has been one of Davidson’s most important discoveries: the “cognitive brain” is also the “emotional brain.” As a result, activity in certain cognitive regions sends signals to the emotion-generating regions. So while you can’t just order yourself to have a particular feeling, you can sort of sneak up on your emotions via your thoughts.

 

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How Addiction Can Affect Brain Connections

How Addiction Can Affect Brain Connections | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

A growing body of research shows that addiction is a complex brain disease that affects people differently. But the research also raises hopes about potential treatments.

 

As much of the country grapples with problems resulting from opioid addiction, some Massachusetts scientists say they’re getting a better understanding of the profound role the brain plays in addiction.

Their work is among a growing body of research showing that addiction is a complex brain disease that affects people differently. But the research also raises hopes about potential treatments.

 

Among the findings of some University of Massachusetts Medical School scientists is that addiction appears to permanently affect the connections between areas of the brain to almost “hard-wire” the brain to support the addiction.

 

They’re also exploring the neural roots of addiction and seeking novel treatments — including perhaps the age-old practice of meditation.

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Can Meditation Really Slow Ageing?

Can Meditation Really Slow Ageing? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Age-related conditions from osteoarthritis, diabetes and obesity to heart disease, Alzheimer’s and stroke have all been linked to short telomeres.

 

One of the most effective interventions, apparently capable of slowing the erosion of telomeres – and perhaps even lengthening them again – is meditation.

 

So far the studies are small, but they all tentatively point in the same direction. In one ambitious project, Blackburn and her colleagues sent participants to meditate at the Shambhala mountain retreat in northern Colorado. Those who completed a three-month course had 30 per cent higher levels of telomerase than a similar group on a waiting list. A pilot study of dementia caregivers, carried out with UCLA’s Irwin and published in 2013, found that volunteers who did an ancient chanting meditation called Kirtan Kriya, 12 minutes a day for eight weeks, had significantly higher telomerase activity than a control group who listened to relaxing music. And a collaboration with UCSF physician and self-help guru Dean Ornish, also published in 2013, found that men with low-risk prostate cancer who undertook comprehensive lifestyle changes, including meditation, kept their telomerase activity higher than similar men in a control group and had slightly longer telomeres after five years.

 

Theories differ as to how meditation might boost telomeres and telomerase, but most likely it reduces stress. The practice involves slow, regular breathing, which may relax us physically by calming the fight-or-flight response. It probably has a psychological stress-busting effect too. Being able to step back from negative or stressful thoughts may allow us to realise that these are not necessarily accurate reflections of reality but passing, ephemeral events. It also helps us to appreciate the present instead of continually worrying about the past or planning for the future.

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6 Scientifically Proven Ways To Boost Your Self-Control

6 Scientifically Proven Ways To Boost Your Self-Control | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

The prefontal cortex (that section of the brain right behind your forehead) is the part that helps us with things like decision-making and regulating our behavior. Self-control, or willpower, falls under this heading, and thus is taken care of in this part of the brain.

 

To be effective at controlling our urges and making sound decisions, the prefontal cortex needs to be looked after. That means feeding it with good-quality food so it has enough energy to do its job and getting enough sleep.

 

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Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, July 14, 1:31 AM

The human brain is a finely tuned machine which needs to be taken care of. Read more about the brain here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/biotech-and-beyond/?tag=Brain

 

A previous scoop also describes ways to maintain our focus in the digital age of limitless information http://sco.lt/90xEu1

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Creating Change: Yoga, Fascia and Mind-Body Transformation

Creating Change: Yoga, Fascia and Mind-Body Transformation | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

When stress builds up in the brain, it only has two ways out — one is the chemistry of the body. Stress changes the messenger molecules or neuropeptides that are bathing the nervous system and thus changes your mood. And those chemicals have a variety of effects all over the body, not just the nervous system.

 

But the other way that distress manifests itself is in patterns of tension. And the trouble with those patterns arises when they become lodged permanently as chronic tension patterns. Patterns that move are just fine. We get angry. We get un-angry. We get sad. We get un-sad. The trouble is with the things that come along and stay for a long time, like the unresolved anger or the unresolved grief.

 

With those, the brain keeps sending out the same messages to the same muscles, and so you take on a specific postural pattern. And after a while, your mind has fit into that pattern, your muscles have fit into that pattern, your fascia has fit into that pattern, your distribution of energy has fit into that pattern, and that may in itself cause illness or lack of ability to move.

 

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Can Neuroscientists Rewrite Our Traumatic Memories?

Can Neuroscientists Rewrite Our Traumatic Memories? | Meditation Compassion Mindfulness | Scoop.it

Daniela Schiller and a growing number of neuroscience colleagues have an ambitious goal: to find a way to rewrite our darkest memories. “Fear takes over the lives of so many people. And there is not enough that we can do about it,” she said. "“I want to disentangle painful emotion from the memory it is associated with,” she said. “Then somebody could recall a terrible trauma, like those my father obviously endured, without the terror that makes it so disabling. You would still have the memory, but not the overwhelming fear attached to it."

 

These days, we tend to think of memory as a camera or a video recorder, filming, storing, and recycling the vast troves of data we accumulate throughout our lives. In practice, though, every memory we retain depends upon a chain of chemical interactions that connect millions of neurons to one another. Those neurons never touch; instead, they communicate through tiny gaps, or synapses, that surround each of them. Every neuron has branching filaments, called dendrites, that receive chemical signals from other nerve cells and send the information across the synapse to the body of the next cell. The typical human brain has trillions of these connections. When we learn something, chemicals in the brain strengthen the synapses that connect neurons. Long-term memories, built from new proteins, change those synaptic networks constantly; inevitably, some grow weaker and others, as they absorb new information, grow more powerful.

 

Memories come in many forms. Implicit, procedural memories—how we ride a bike, tie our shoes, make an omelette—are distributed throughout the brain. Emotional memories, like fear and love, are stored in the amygdala, an almond-shaped set of neurons situated deep in the temporal lobe, behind the eyes. Conscious, visual memories—the date of a doctor’s appointment, the names of the Presidents—reside in the hippocampus, which also processes information about context. It takes effort to bring those memories to the surface of awareness. Each of us has memories that we wish we could erase, and memories that we cannot summon no matter how hard we try.

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