Mindful Parenting
93 views | +0 today
Follow
Mindful Parenting
Parenting skills from a mindfulness perspective
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from The Promise of Mindfulness Meditation
Scoop.it!

Mindful Schools: Online Courses for Learning Mindfulness and Teaching Mindfulness to K-12 Children and Adolescents

Mindful Schools: Online Courses for Learning Mindfulness and Teaching Mindfulness to K-12 Children and Adolescents | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it

"Our mission is to help lead the integration of mindfulness into education. We are a non-profit organization that offers a complete multi-level training program for adults, in-class instruction for children, and other resources to support mindfulness in education. Our program has used a scientifically proven technique called mindfulness to teach self-awareness, focus, impulse control, and empathy to over 18,000 children and 750 teachers in 70 schools, about 70% serving predominantly low-income children."


Via Kat Tansey
more...
Kat Tansey's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:01 PM

 

If you are interested in teaching mindfulness in your classroom, this is your opportunity to:  learn and practice mindfulness yourself; learn a proven curriculum for teaching in the classroom; and become certified to teach this curriculum to K-12 students.

 

Even if you decide not to teach this curriculum, treat yourself to their online course in mindfulness -- it will change your life, and just by changing your life you will begin to change the lives of your students.

 

Be the change. ~ Gandhi

 

Kat Tansey

ChoosingToBeFit.com

Randy Bauer's curator insight, March 26, 2014 7:34 PM

What will the Next Generation have to offer if our Youth is exposed to, and learns the applications of Mindfulness?

What will follow Millenials?

Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Mom Psych
Scoop.it!

Do Sunny Climates Reduce ADHD?

Do Sunny Climates Reduce ADHD? | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it
Study finds regions with high sunlight intensity have a lower prevalence of ADHD, suggesting that high sunlight intensity may exert a 'protective' effect for ADHD.

Via Gina Stepp
Melanie Greenberg's insight:

There are lower rates of ADHD in sunny climes. NOt sure if this is diue to the weather or some other factor. Maybe people exercise more, which helps attention.

more...
Lon Woodbury's comment, October 23, 2013 4:46 PM
If it turns out to be anything to this, perhaps the tendency of children to spend less time outdoors could be one of the causative factors. -Lon
Gina Stepp's comment, October 23, 2013 5:23 PM
I was thinking the same thing, Lon. It will be interesting to see what else they find as they go on.
Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Mom Psych
Scoop.it!

Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children

Trickle-down anxiety: Study examines parental behaviors that create anxious children | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it
Parents with social anxiety disorder are more likely than parents with other forms of anxiety to engage in behaviors that put their children at high risk for developing angst of their own, according to a small study of parent-child pairs.

 

Anxiety is the result of a complex interplay between genes and environment, the researchers say, and while there's not much to be done about one's genetic makeup, controlling external factors can go a long way toward mitigating or preventing anxiety in the offspring of anxious parents.


"Children with an inherited propensity to anxiety do not just become anxious because of their genes, so what we need are ways to prevent the environmental catalysts -- in this case, parental behaviors -- from unlocking the underlying genetic mechanisms responsible for the disease," Ginsburg says.


Via Gina Stepp
more...
Hilary J.'s curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:39 PM

The debate regarding whether nurture or nature plays a larger role in mental illness has been ongoing for sometime. Recent research though, has identified that these two factors work with each other and not against each other like previously thought. In regards to anxiety and the development of an anxiety disorder, the researchers of this article note a significant amount of research has found that the children of those with anxiety disorders may have a higher genetic predisposition for developing their own anxiety disorder than the children of those without an anxiety disorder. An additional component that was researched though, was the attitudes and behavioral habits of those parents with anxiety disorders; essentially, the effect that the environment these parents created for their children who already had higher predispositions to developing an anxiety disorder was closely examined. Using factors of parental warmth and affection, this research found that parents diagnosed with an anxiety disorder showed less warmth and affection towards their children, criticized them more often and expressed doubts about their child's ability to perform a task. Learning about genetic and environmental components and the implications they may have on the prevention of anxiety, particularly in childhood, is of utmost importance. Anxiety disorders often go unrecognized in childhood. Because of the likely delays in diagnosis and treatment, the child may be at higher risk for depression and poor academic performance not only in childhood, but into their adult years as well. 

Loran Northey's curator insight, March 9, 2014 1:35 PM

Children model behaviour and if the behaviour they continually witness is worry, fear and anxiety then that unfortunately is what they will learn to do to. 

Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Mom Psych
Scoop.it!

Parenting: Why Empathy is Not Indulgence

Parenting: Why Empathy is Not Indulgence | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it
What is the role of empathy and understanding in good parenting? Have parents become too concerned with children’s feelings and not concerned enough with their behavior?

Via Gina Stepp
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Melanie Greenberg
Scoop.it!

Perils of Texting While Parenting

Perils of Texting While Parenting | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it
Are too many parents distracted by mobile devices when they should be watching their kids? A recent rise in injuries, reversing the longstanding trend, has doctors worried that the answer is yes.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

Bad seed or little angel? Book says babies both

Bad seed or little angel? Book says babies both | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it

"...Bloom: I think we naturally have multiple moral systems, multiple responses. Some of our responses are created by disgust, some by empathy, some by a sense of justice, some by a sense of fairness, some by self-interest. We respond to kin, to our family members in different ways than we respond to strangers in all sorts of ways that don't fall into any elegant philosophical theory. And I think this is true for babies, too.

 

Babies are moral beings but they aren't moral philosophers. They don't have some sort of coherent theory. Rather they have a series of gut reactions, a series of moral triggers that they respond to. What we find in our research is all sorts of moral capacities on the part of babies. What we don't find is some kind of careful, contemplative theory.

 

AP: Is that a bad thing?

 

Bloom: It isn't. It's the way we are, one way or another, but if you set yourself the task of constructing a society where everybody lives and everybody follows the same rules and adheres to the same notions, then you do want to some degree a consistent and coherent theory.

So it may be a good theory of psychology to say that a white person naturally cares a lot more toward another white person than toward a black person, and that's an instinctive response that could develop in certain societies, but from the standpoint of constructing a theory of what actually is good, how we should live our lives, we would say, 'Well that's too hodgepodge for us. It's inconsistent. It's actually a cruel way for the mind to work.'..."

 

[click on the title for the full article]

 

 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
more...
Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Counselling and More
Scoop.it!

What's the difference between these two brains?

What's the difference between these two brains? | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it

Neurologists are beginning to understand exactly how a baby’s interaction with their mother determines how, and indeed whether, the brain grows in the way that it should. Professor Allan Schore, of UCLA, who has surveyed the scientific literature and has made significant contributions to it, stresses that the growth of brain cells is a “consequence of an infant’s interaction with the main caregiver [usually the mother]”. The growth of the baby’s brain “literally requires positive interaction between mother and infant. The development of cerebral circuits depends on it.”

 

[click on the title for the full article]


Via Martha Love, Dimitris Tsantaris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Mom Psych
Scoop.it!

Child Psychiatrist Provides Tips for Talking to Children About Hurricanes, Floods

Child Psychiatrist Provides Tips for Talking to Children About Hurricanes, Floods | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it

Newswise — With the onslaught of “Frankenstorm” Sandy, parents and teachers are once again faced with the challenge of discussing an overwhelming natural disaster with children. According to David Fassler, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont College of Medicine, these conversations, while difficult, are also important. A child and adolescent psychiatrist practicing in Burlington, Vt., Fassler offers the following suggestions for adults navigating these conversations:


1. Create an open and supportive environment where children know they can ask questions. At the same time, it’s best not to force children to talk about things unless and until they’re ready.


2. Give children honest answers and information. Children will usually know, or eventually find out, if you’re “making things up”. It may affect their ability to trust you or your reassurances in the future.


3. Use words and concepts children can understand. Gear your explanations to the child’s age, language, and developmental level.

(more: http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/595631/?sc=lwhr&xy=5049882 )


Via Gina Stepp
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Melanie Greenberg
Scoop.it!

Attributes of a Mother—The Good, the Bad, and the Funny

Attributes of a Mother—The Good, the Bad, and the Funny | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it
Mothers evoke awe, love, laughter, and controversy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Melanie Greenberg
Scoop.it!

Worst Mistakes Parents Make When Talking to Kids

Worst Mistakes Parents Make When Talking to Kids | Mindful Parenting | Scoop.it

The best type of parenting is fair, flexible, respectful, and has learning, rather than submission as its goal. Hearing and respecting feelings, allowing choice, yet setting fair and clear limits on unacceptable behavior is the healthy balance that we should all strive for. This article will teach you how to avoid ineffective ways of communicating that lead to noncompliance and power struggles, or damage self-esteem

more...
No comment yet.