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A Delightful Animated Version Of George Saunders's Graduation Speech On Kindness

A Delightful Animated Version Of George Saunders's Graduation Speech On Kindness | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Kindness is a cornerstone of good leadership.  Kindness is ultimately about the basic respect you have for the humanity of the person standing in front of you needing your compassion. 

Speaking from my own experiences, many leaders mistake showing kindness for showing weakness.  We can give them the benefit of the doubt and assume they learned their skills from other mediocre leaders who would choose fear as their hammer.   That doesn't abscond these leaders from unlearning some of their destructive tendencies and relearning a better, more productive model. If they see no issue with how they're leading, they probably should not be leading others.  Leading is more than anything an expression of humanity where a person is entrusted with lifting up the people around them.  You just can't lead with any sort of humanity if you see basic kindness as weakness.  

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, May 1, 2014 5:18 AM

Great scoop here by Lynne Constantine-Johns and a powerful animation. 


It is a powerful animation because of its relevance to all of us in our attempts and failures of being kind.   I am not only reminded of the times I was not kind to people I barely know, but, most impactful are the times that I have not been kind to those I love the most.  


Highly recommend this one!!!  


Thanks Lynne Constantine-Johns. 

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10 Traits of Ego-Driven Leaders | workplace MOJO

10 Traits of Ego-Driven Leaders | workplace MOJO | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it

We all meet our egos on the path to becoming leaders...

Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

We are all guilty of ego:  we have all acted out, had our egos take over and often the results are disastrous, but as with most disasters, they are important parts of learning to effectively lead.   When I read the list I recognized (and winced a bit) at some of these because I was reminded of mistakes I've made (sometimes more than once) in my desire to be considered a 'strong' leader--the irony is that any one of these may make you feel like a strong leader, just not to those you are leading.  Self-awareness and the ability to hear difficult, constructive feedback can help you, as it has helped me, to recognize when I have been driven by ego instead of a higher purpose, like the good of the team members and our mission.  What is very discouraging is how much of these behaviors are still alive and well, particularly with the 'old guard' of leadership where results of a team were/are subsumed by one person and not considered the teams' responsibility--good, bad or somewhere in between.   Egos are like opinions, we all have them and IMO the keys to balancing our behaviors (so that we are not slaves to our egos) include rigorous self-awareness, surrounding ourselves with trusted mentors who will point out what we aren't able to see, and building a team where feedback is rewarded.   Of these 10 traits are there a couple, in your opinion, that are more egregious or damaging than others?

 

Thanks to themojocompany.com for the Scoop!

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12 Personality Traits of a Great Boss (Infographic)

Great managers look at every situation as a learning opportunity and resist the temptation to micromanage.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

the unsaid subtext here is "do all of these things without an agenda of manipulation" 

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Do you work for someone who has the ability to lift you up?

Do you work for someone who has the ability to lift you up? | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Never underestimate the importance of being 'lifted up' vs. being held down or back.

 

Chances are, if you have ever worked with 'leaders' who were guilty of one or more of these:

 

*inconsistent behavior, including under what conditions they will support you

*limitations of support or help keeping you off balance because your waiting for the other 'shoe to drop'

*dismissive attitude toward your ideas or co-opting your ideas or work without giving proper credit as it is due

*being told to work in a manner that puts boundaries and distance between colleagues and/or between your team and other teams in the organization

*behaviors that would indicate that the leader feels threatened when a member of their team is successful or garners recognition apart from the leader

*Using information about individual employees performance as a weapon to undermine self-confidence and morale

 

the leader you're working with is incapable of lifting you up.  The behaviors are indicative of people who are motivated by fear, who feel that the number of people who can be doing well at any one time is finite and who are, more than likely, unclear of their own worth in the organization, 

 

If you walk out of work feeling sapped, exhausted and demoralized on a regular basis, it is time to reevaluate if you are in the right place and being lead by someone who is not capable to helping you improve, lifting you up, and helping you meet and exceed your goals.

 

Thanks to Christina Luce Hilton for the Scoop!

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A Mindful Approach to Blame & Taking Responsibility.

A Mindful Approach to Blame & Taking Responsibility. | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it

We live inside a bubble of perception. Everything we do is based on the choices we make. Let's stop blaming find another way to choose to be.

Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Can blame be banished from the workplace?  I think it can be, but it takes a visionary leader who actively builds and feeds this type of workplace. Leaders must set the example through modeling a 'blameless' workplace; it is perhaps one of trickiest tasks of leadership, in my opinion. One starting point may be through candid conversations where members of the team work together to create some parameters about how the team reacts when the actions of one or more team members has negative repercussions.   The group needs to buy into the fact that no matter how 'hot the spot' the team gets into, there is very little good that will come from the blame game in a professional situation.  

 

There is an emotional piece of this that has to be dealt with, too. And dealing with the emotions that surround this issue can be complex.  We live in a society where blame is an everyday occurrence: you only need to look as far as the daily functions of our government to see blame in action.  Very few role models coming from the country's leadership, unfortunately.   Even as younger people we are taught (in school or within families) the 'importance' of meting out the one at fault. Given this, building a 'blameless' environment can run against everyone's long learned behavior.  Leaders need to be prepared for the "well that wasn't my fault" reaction from team members.  We are embedded with the importance of fault/blame and aren't used to the idea of ’shared blame'-- particularly when one person is clearly the culprit of the error. Moving beyond blame to the 'field' mentioned in the quote may be like the emotional equivalent of grading on a curve--those who are on the 'left' tail will feel like they are being punished for those who didn't pull their weight.  Even so, it can happen, blame can come out of the equation completely and give way to the more positive "we rise together or we learn together" way of operating.    And then when something is corrected, everyone learns and gets a chunk of the credit.  I was inspired by a quote I read earlier this week that went something like "I don't lose, I either succeed or I learn" and that same philosophy can be applied in the workplace. A little bit of bad news for the leader, though: you have to actively work to create this environment. Each of us brings too much baggage for this way of working to bubble up organically in a team (unless you have a group of super enlightened peeps!).  

 

To be clear, I'm not insinuating that individuals not be held accountable for their actions, corrected when necessary and held to a high standards.  Mistakes make for great learning opportunities, so the supervisor of the group may work with an individual to help ensure that whatever issue brought them here can be avoided.  In terms of the team, though, I think accountability and blame are two very different things--and at the risk of repeating myself, one has no positive place in the workplace and the other is a cornerstone of both a strong individual professional, as well as the team. 

 

Thanks to elephantjournal.com for the Scoop.

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Socioculturally speaking, why do we have too few women leaders?

Socioculturally speaking, why do we have too few women leaders? | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg looks at why a smaller percentage of women than men reach the top of their professions -- and offers 3 powerful pieces of advice to women aiming for the C-suite.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Sheryl talks about 3 reasons why, she feels, there are too few women at the top.  Although she spends a bit of time talking about women with children, her reasons are applicable to all women, whether you have children or not.  Her advice is basically this:

 

1. Sit at the table

2. Make your partner a real partner

3. Don't leave before you leave

 

I will let you watch and see what she means by each of these, but I would like to comment on one thing she speaks about starting at about 7:10 in the video.

 

 There is one standout point, made by Sandburg that illustrates how the imbalance of power is embedded in our culture: in leadership:  'likability' is positively correlated for men and negatively correlated for women.  Think about the impact of this.  Basically, a woman is who liked has a lesser chance of being promoted than a man (who is more or less her equal) who is well liked in the organization. Even more poignant is that women who are liked also breed suspicion, among colleagues, as to whether or not they can handle a higher level job.  This one point alone illustrates the need for more education, for men and women, about cultural bias and embedded values that are part of our workforce but don't get recognized and so the harm continues... This talk makes a strong case for the need for more entrepreneurship education for our younger people--girls and boys, while still in 3rd grade and up should be learning the values of entrepreneurship and what it means to level the gender playing field.

 

 

 

 

 

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Leadership and Love

Leadership and Love | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

I'm not sure when it became (or if it is becoming) OK to use the word 'Love' to describe your relationships at work, but I think the change is much needed.  (Onviously in this case love is not used to describe romantic or inappropriate types of love, in the workplace!)

 

This list is a wonderful reminder that great leaders have deep caring commitment  and compassion for the people they lead, they often praising openly and often for good work,  they are not threatened by talented people and the use their power judiciously.  I think what is also very interesting that 'Cast Your Vision' is last on the list.  I think, though, and I'm just making a supposition here, that great leaders 'live' their vision and you don't have to constantly speak about it.  When you treat people with respect they tend to buy into your vision, so while you do want to revisit it, particularly if things change, you don't have to see you vision as a nail, and hammer away at it on a regular basis.

 

Thanks to Bryan Caldwell for the Scoop!

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7 Productivity Apps You Can't Live Without | Inc.com

Get even more done with some of these new and updated applications. Slideshow Options Loop Through: Don't loop
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

OK, like any 'list' of apps you can't live without, there are some apps you can absolutely live without on this list.  That being said, there are a few newer apps that could help you organize not just your work life, but help you balance your professional and personal life.  The list is worth a quick look...it's set up as a slideshow, so you can flip through pretty quickly.  Check them out!

Thanks Inc,com for the Scoop!

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On Leadership & Forgiveness

On Leadership & Forgiveness | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
This week on Leading Beyond the Status Quo we explored a critical and very difficult leadership trait to master; forgiveness. It was truly an honor to...
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Too often we find the 'scorecard' mentality in the workplace--the phenomenon of keeping a running record (either written or mental) of the negative things that have been predicated in your direction--whether intentional or not.  Often called 'documentation', people will say that they are writing down these things to protect themselves should they need it.  However, I believe that the documentation, or scorecard if you will, becomes a destructive artifact that lives within the organization and ultimately drives people apart.

 

This exploration in this article helps to illustrate the power of forgiveness in the workplace, but also questions the basic premise of how 'human' can we/should we be in a work environment?  Vulnerability is, generally speaking, a very uncomfortable emotion, however vulnerability is necessary for true forgiveness.  If we could usher in a movement where things were forgiven and people were taught how to move beyond missteps or mistakes, we would begin to see more humane organizations where basic human needs, such as kindness, positive regard, and respect carry a much higher premium than on the 'GOTCHA'.  

Thank you Al Gonzales (with Professor Kim Cameron) for this excellent article and Scoop!

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AlGonzalezinfo's comment, May 1, 2014 5:08 AM
You are more than welcome Lynne. So great to find you on Scoop.it! I love your in-depth curation style and will recommend this topic!
diane gusa's curator insight, May 17, 2014 10:22 AM

My goal:

My forgiveness is absent of conditions. I will forgive you because I feel compassion towards you. While I don’t like what you did, I can authentically forgive you, regardless of any circumstance. 

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A New Leadership Model That's Surprisingly Useful

A New Leadership Model That's Surprisingly Useful | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
When it comes to leadership, are you like the person at the gym with huge biceps and skinny chicken legs? Are you adequately recognizing the different forms of leadership needed to do your job and
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5 Career Mistakes You Didn’t Know You Were Making

5 Career Mistakes You Didn’t Know You Were Making | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Career experts shed light on the missteps we make without even realizing, whether at the office or in the trenches of a job hunt.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Some of these are obvious, but the most interesting is the point of making yourself 'less' available'.   To me professional development is needed around this topic for managers and workers alike.  Everyone in the leadership chain has to agree on the parameters of making yourself 'less available' and, most critically the leader and team must know how to support it.

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Quotes are the new black....if you agree you will want to download 'hustle' :-)

Quotes are the new black....if you agree you will want to download 'hustle' :-) | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
A meditation on business and professional success, made-up with a carefully chosen selection of 133 meaningful quotes from a wide-range of leading thinkers, successful business people, creatives and industry experts in key areas: including Napoleon Hill, Marilyn Suttle, Walt Disney, Thomas Edison, Benjamin Franklin, Edward De Bono, Joe Pulizzi and many, many more.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Quotes are the new black -- but if you find them inspiring, hustle is can you give a daily dose of thought leaders and successful people and the gems they have to share.

 

Thanks to Simon Larcombe for the Scoop!

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Simon Larcombe's comment, June 18, 2014 10:06 PM
Thank you Lynne, for sharing :)
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Do you agree with the following quote:

Do you agree with the following quote: | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Some may say that being positive in a negative situation is not authentic.  Shouldn't a leader acknowledge the reality before beginning to spin positives?  Or, should the leader actively take the role of 'cheerleader' (for lack of a better word) when the situation is not as positive as it could be? What resonates with a team when a situation has gone south and what is needed from the leader?

 

I would love to hear the thoughts from others...

 

 

Thanks to Michele Kilburn for the Scoop!

 

 

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Does your workplace promote integrity and humanity?

Does your workplace promote integrity and humanity? | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Integrity, bravery and accountability....does your supervisor/leader create an environment where you can practice these things, or even more importantly are there expectations that you will practice humanity and excellence?  My guess is that, if you've been working long enough, you've experienced environments where these things were minimized or even punished, as well as organizations that promoted integrity and humanity. 

 

A question, for me, that I would love to hear more about is what integrity and bravery 'look' like in the workplace.  Please feel free to share!

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Christopher Jones's curator insight, June 13, 2014 10:10 AM

It's simple really. Do. What's. Right.

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Boost Leadership Effectiveness With Online Learning

Boost Leadership Effectiveness With Online Learning | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
How exactly can businesses convince their top leaders that e-learning can be of value to them, and boost their leadership effectiveness in the workplace?
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

If leaders of today are not harnessing the power of technology, the boat is sailing away and they need to hop aboard.  Online learning not only offers flexible ways of delivering and housing pertinent information, it creates an archive to where you've been.  The important of organizational memory doesn't always get the attention it deserves, but using technology to create an audit trail of processes where decisions are being made and changes will follow is no a brainer,  That's not to say that, with all the different technologies your organization has the job of finding out which is best for your needs, but ultimately it's worth the trouble.

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diane gusa's comment, June 1, 2014 10:13 PM
I love scooping from you!
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Coaching History : Welcome to The Coaching Commons

Coaching History : Welcome to The Coaching Commons | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it

http://coachingcommons.org/category/coaching-history/

Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Leadership, to me, has always been about coaching and mentoring. That isn't to say that leaders don't have to make decisions, have vision, etc. but if you build a great team, as a leader, you don't have to do the difficult, complex things solo.  More than ever research and literature show that what employees really want is to be heard, appreciated and recognized for their individual and group contributions, yet daily tasks get in the way of these things and giving proper kudos easily falls to the bottom of the list.  Some of the greatest leaders share practices such as 'thank your team everyday for the work they do'  and 'recognize achievements swiftly."   These things are just about patting someone on the back, they are positive reinforcement; they are an investment that your employee will continue to do the type of work that you've lauded them for doing.

 

  The Coaching Commons site is like having all the great leaders in one room.  Check it out--I hope that you find it useful.

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Want to Become the Most Interesting Person Around? Start With These 7 Steps.

Want to Become the Most Interesting Person Around? Start With These 7 Steps. | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Not only are interesting people more liked, they are more successful.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

What's fascinating about this list is that it centers on connections--good leadership is about authentic connections.  What's even more interesting is that we are finally stating to getting it! 

" I'm not always a leader, but when I am, I buy everyone a Dos Equis and listen as people tell their stories, share perspectives, and show the courage to be themselves and speak their truth.  And I, as the leader, listen.."   :-)

 

What do you think?

Thanks Entrepreneur for the Scoop!

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Picking the right supervisor...

Picking the right supervisor... | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it

You can't pick your supervisor, but you can choose whether or not you will work with her or him. 

Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

It is natural to get caught up in pursuing the 'perfect' job, and you are most vulnerable when it is in reach.  Have you every gone into a job  ignoring that little voice that is telling you that your supervisor may not be the greatest fit, even if the job is?  Don't ignore that gut feeling--a perfect job, at least in most cases, doesn't exist.  The quality of any job will increase or decrease in direct correlation to your supervisor's leadership style.   Respect is the baseline--without it, you will spend most of your work life miserable.  But what else is important to you?  During the interview is the perfect time to put your possible supervisor in the hot seat and ask them  questions about their ideas about their leadership style, as well as what they feel makes a an effective work environment.  Watch for some tell-tale signs that your leader-to-be may not be the right fit for you.  If the job is awesome, but your boss is not....well, chances are the job isn't going to be nearly as awesome as it might be.  

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Tweet from @micheleblersch

Tweet from @micheleblersch | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
You don't have to hold a position or a title in order to be a leader. #Leadership #success http://t.co/weEUa71p8X
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

What if we all embodied a spirit of leadership, regardless of position?

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A Delightful Animated Version Of George Saunders's Graduation Speech On Kindness

A Delightful Animated Version Of George Saunders's Graduation Speech On Kindness | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

Kindness is a cornerstone of good leadership.  Kindness is ultimately about the basic respect you have for the humanity of the person standing in front of you needing your compassion. 

Speaking from my own experiences, many leaders mistake showing kindness for showing weakness.  We can give them the benefit of the doubt and assume they learned their skills from other mediocre leaders who would choose fear as their hammer.   That doesn't abscond these leaders from unlearning some of their destructive tendencies and relearning a better, more productive model. If they see no issue with how they're leading, they probably should not be leading others.  Leading is more than anything an expression of humanity where a person is entrusted with lifting up the people around them.  You just can't lead with any sort of humanity if you see basic kindness as weakness.  

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, May 1, 2014 5:18 AM

Great scoop here by Lynne Constantine-Johns and a powerful animation. 


It is a powerful animation because of its relevance to all of us in our attempts and failures of being kind.   I am not only reminded of the times I was not kind to people I barely know, but, most impactful are the times that I have not been kind to those I love the most.  


Highly recommend this one!!!  


Thanks Lynne Constantine-Johns. 

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10 Tips To Help Non-Technical Employees Thrive

10 Tips To Help Non-Technical Employees Thrive | Mindful Leadership | Scoop.it
Working at a technology company doesn't mean you have to be an engineer to have a killer career.
Lynne Constantine-Johns's insight:

YES!  If you aren't sure that your administrative, managerial, and other 'soft skills' are phasing out in terms of importance, spend some time with people who are trying to begin a tech-centric start-up.  Your well honed skills are needed, and I will go out on a  limb and say that some of us whose careers started before the start-up/tech revolution are a little older, we have much to offer our younger, less-experienced brethren.  The key is we have to do our part to understand their mindset, language and world in which they are operating--only then can we add value through mentoring, coaching, process building, long term planning/strategizing and other areas where the technical folks may not be able to spend their time and energy.   If the non-techies (like me!) show willingness to play in the sandbox with the dyed-in-the-wool techies, I think we will quickly find that there is room for everyone...AND what we can create together is much more powerful than what any one group can do on their own.

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