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Metacognition

Metacognition | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Thanks @BealsyLaura for sharing link to this resource from GAINS: http://t.co/Fcil4x2mGV”; love video about learning goals and metacogition
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Mindful Education
Understanding the role of 'mindfulness' in schools & society - from metacognition to meditation - particularly in this era of social media
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The Brain from Top to Bottom

The Brain from Top to Bottom | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Peter Skillen's insight:

Wonderful site from McGill University. It has Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced sections related to the brain. Worth checking out if you are interested in cognitive science, learning, emotions, etc.

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Ipnotica's curator insight, October 19, 4:53 AM

If your brain came with a user's manual, this would be it! 

Ipnotica's comment, October 19, 4:53 AM
Great scoop, thanks!
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The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload - Kindle edition by Daniel J. Levitin. Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.

The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload - Kindle edition by Daniel J. Levitin. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.
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Learning How to Exert Self-Control

Learning How to Exert Self-Control | Mindful Education | Scoop.it

"At age 84, Mr. Mischel is about to publish his first nonacademic book, “The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control.” He says we anxious parents timing our kids in front of treats are missing a key finding of willpower research: Whether you eat the marshmallow at age 5 isn’t your destiny. Self-control can be taught. Grown-ups can use it to tackle the burning issues of modern middle-class life: how to go to bed earlier, not check email obsessively, stop yelling at our children and spouses, and eat less bread. Poor kids need self-control skills if they’re going to catch up at school.


Via Dennis Richards
Peter Skillen's insight:

Self-regulation, once again, comes to the fore in educational circles. :-) Perhaps it is even more difficult in this era–replete with multiple distractions, a culture of immediate gratification & reckless materialism, and the challenges in schools with meaningful student engagement.

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Hey teacher. Think you don’t have impact? Think again.

e are some Hey teacher. Think you don’t have impact? Think again. I had lunch yesterday with a former student of mine. It was my first year teaching. I was 21. She was 10. It was the early seventies. It was s...

Peter Skillen's insight:

You know, when I wrote this yesterday, I realized that—once again—mindfulness plays a powerful role. We must practice it regularly. No, actually, it simply must become a 'way of being' lest it be merely a contrived exercise. Having said that, I think that there are techniques or exercises worth practising to cement that more mindful way of being. 

 

Certainly, one thing I have worked hard at is 'taking the pause' before I react. When a student, or other, causes an emotion that might quickly draw an action, I'll do my best to take a few seconds to observe it, to set my ego aside, and to look deeper at the stimulus causing the emotional reaction. Then, I am better prepared to behave with a reasoned response.

 

 

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When Mindfulness Trumps Flow

When Mindfulness Trumps Flow | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Which do you choose when these two positive processes collide?
Peter Skillen's insight:

Once again, this article points out that nothing is simple. Here we have two great theories and practices -- Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's 'flow' and 'mindfulness'.  It seems that we need to be 'mindful' of our 'flow' states. :-)  Read the article for more thoughts.

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Brainstorm in Progress: Connectivism, Neuroscience, and Education

Brainstorm in Progress: Connectivism, Neuroscience, and Education | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Peter Skillen's insight:

Love these emerging views of learning and mind...and the role of the brain. Geoff Cain works a lot with concept mapping and likes to think about concept maps as a possible metaphor for how learning may work in networks - including neural networks. He also relates this to the Connectivism learning theory of George Siemens & Stephen Downes. Great read.

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Understanding The Effects Of Hierarchy In Society

"Professor Robert Sapolsky's baboon studies offer insight into the negative effects of hierarchy in society: "So what do baboons teach the average person, don't bite somebody because your having a b...


Via june holley
Peter Skillen's insight:

Professor Robert Sapolsky always makes me think deeply about what we assume to be 'the way it is'. But, it doesn't have to be that way.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, April 4, 10:58 PM

Sapolsky is a world-reknowned primatologist who notes an important empirical observation of an instance in which a fiercely hierarchical baboon society was able to re-arrange itself into a more egalitarian, less conflict-ruled social structure.

Lia Goren's curator insight, April 23, 1:31 AM

Interesantísima experiencia del Profesor Robert Sapolsky acerca de los efectos negativos de la jerarquía en la sociedad. ¿Qué pasó en una comunidad de mandriles cuando los machos alfa maltratadores estaban y cuando dejaron de estar? Sorprendente!

El link de la Fundación P2P tiene otras referencias acerca del tema.

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The Technium: Multiplexing vs Multitasking

The Technium: Multiplexing vs Multitasking | Mindful Education | Scoop.it

"Starner replied that he multiplexes rather than multitasks. Multiplexing means doing tasks that reinforce each other. For him, taking notes and having conversations are tasks that parallel and enrich each other. They are multiplexed. On the other hand, he doesn't try to manage email during a conversation or while walking down the street. That would be multitasking. "If the wearable task is directly related to the conversation, the the user's attention is not 'split' and multiplexing can be pretty effective."

As Thad Starner explained to me, distraction can be avoided by multiplexing rather than multitasking.... We have no difficulty absorbing all at once the music of a parade, the sight of uniformed marchers, bright sunlight, an autumn breeze, a pain in one's knee, the smell and taste of hot dogs, and the clasp of a loved ones's hand."


Via Howard Rheingold
Peter Skillen's insight:

I love this distinction. NCTE's notion of ''managing multiple streams of information' makes sense when viewed as multiplexing. People have been interpreting this as multitasking - and this has been grossly incorrect in my opinion

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, February 11, 2:14 PM

While Google Glass is what most of the world hears about wearable info-devices these days, Steve Mann and Thad Starner were experimenting with (much bulkier!) wearable devices at the Media Lab more than a decade ago. I interviewed Tharner back then. He had a head-mounted display and he also communicated wirelessly with his networks through a one-handed keyboard ("twiddler"), sometimes asking questions about conversations he was engaged in face to face. In this blog post, Kevin Kelly picks out a key passage from an interview with Starner in a book by Michael Chorost. While Cliff Nass' work pretty clearly showed that most (not all!) media multitaskers were degrading rather than enhancing their performance on their tasks, Nass, in conversation with me, noted that he had NOT studies instances in which the multitaskers were working with multiple relevant information streams. Starner calls this multiplexing. We need more research about whether everybody can learn to do this and  whether it enhances or degrades performance.

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Mindfulness Helps Teens with Depression - Rewire Your Brain for Love

Mindfulness Helps Teens with Depression - Rewire Your Brain for Love | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Mindfulness is entering the lives of many new young people as it’s added to school curriculums around the world. This victory is even more relevant as studies show that mindfulness helps reduce teen depression.
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International Handbook of Metacognition and Lea...

International Handbook of Metacognition and Lea... | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
RT @SpringerEdu: International Handbook of #Metacognition and #Learning Technologies by R Azevedo, V Aleven is now on #SpringerLink http://t.co/SOuiye17UB (International Handbook of Metacognition and Learning Technologies - Springer | @scoopit via...
Peter Skillen's insight:

Looks to be a good read! Might have to get this one! 

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Metacognition

Metacognition | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Thanks @BealsyLaura for sharing link to this resource from GAINS: http://t.co/Fcil4x2mGV”; love video about learning goals and metacogition
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Are Stories the Key to Engaging Girls in Science?

Are Stories the Key to Engaging Girls in Science? | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
If we want to change the rate at which we're engaging girls in science -- and do it better -- should we mix STEM subjects with the humanities?
Peter Skillen's insight:

Love this bit...regarding storytelling and its impact on cognition, emotion and behaviour. 

Also the last point supports the notion that when we 'think of an action in the real world', it isn't our visual cortex that lights up - but our motor cortex.

 

"Research has shown that storytelling activates the brain beyond mere word recognition.  In 2006, researchers in Spain discovered that stories stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life. Last year, a team of researchers from Emory University reported in Brain & Language that similes and metaphors can activate sensory portions of the brain, and the Laboratory of Language Dynamics in France discovered that action words can stimulate the motor cortex."

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Every bit of you contributes to your learning experience

Every bit of you contributes to your learning experience | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
When it comes to learning, everything matters - epecially the tips of your toes. 'Human learning is the combination of processes throughout a lifetime whereby the whole person - body (genetic, phys...
Peter Skillen's insight:

I love this post because it acknowledges the complexity and interwoven fabric of the whole that is each of us. Cognitive science is revealing that which philosophers and artists have shared for centuries.

 

It reminds me of a post I wrote called "I'm Confused! Thought I was a Social Constructivist". In it, I stated that I have traveled the path of behaviourism, constructivism, cognitivism, social constructivism, contructionism, social constructionism, intentional learning theory, connectivism — now I am a ‘pot pourri of ponderings’. 

 

http://theconstructionzone.wordpress.com/2012/06/15/im-confused-thought-i-was-a-social-constructionist/

 

The graphic is an awesome visual summary.

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Wisdom in the Age of Information: Maria Popova (Future of StoryTelling 2014) - YouTube

See the rest of our 2014 FoST films here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

“We live in a world awash of information, but we seem to face a growing scarcity of wisdom,” states Maria Popova, Founder of the website Brain Pickings. Popova believes it’s the storyteller’s role to interpret information and shape it into wisdom for the rest of the culture to share.

Via Howard Rheingold
Peter Skillen's insight:

An absolutely clever story about the 'ladder of understanding' in which Maria Popova describes 'information as cheap and wisdom as expensive'. Share this with your students/colleagues if you are discussing 'digital citizenship' or even if you're not. :-)

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, October 11, 3:35 PM

Maria Popova is a great curator. Brain pickings is a great infotention tool -- she spends a lot of time and well-thought-out decision-making about what is good to share. 

Peter Sampson's curator insight, October 21, 2:57 PM

fantastic! Think how this relates to the work of church leader. Storytellers.

Peter Sampson's curator insight, October 21, 2:58 PM

the invaluable task of storytelling

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Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
By teaching students to "drive their own brain" through metacognition, we provide a concrete way to guide them think about how they can best learn.

Via Mika Auramo, Suvi Salo
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Why Dewey would applaud the maker movement in schools: | Confessions from the chair

Why Dewey would applaud the maker movement in schools: | Confessions from the chair | Mindful Education | Scoop.it

Via sylvia martinez
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Linda Stone: Technologies to Support the Essential Self

Linda Stone: Technologies to Support the Essential Self | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Peter Skillen's insight:

This is a wonderful Media Lab presentation by Linda Stone—who coined the term Continuous Partial Attention back in the 90s. She's done a lot of research on the relationship between mind and body particularly as it applies to technology use. She also speaks of using technologies to help guide us in supporting our mind and body 'becoming friends'. 

Very nice piece that is consonant with much other mindfulness research related to the breath, attention and states of flow.

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CJLT special issue on knowledge building

CJLT special issue on knowledge building | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Peter Skillen's insight:

Love this distinction that Carl and Marlene make between 'knowledge building' and 'constructivism'. (Interesting that it has taken 30 years for the construct of knowledge building to become relatively mainstream in education.)

 

“Marlene Scardamalia and Carl Bereiter… define the construct of Knowledge Building as having several characteristics that distinguish it from constructivist learning in general. Two key characteristics of Knowledge Building are intentionality and community knowledge.

 

Intentionality captures that people engaged in knowledge building know they are doing it and that advances in knowledge are purposeful.


Community knowledge captures that while learning is a personal matter, knowledge building is done for the benefit of the community. Scardamalia and Bereiter emphasize that in contrast to being spontaneous, a knowledge building culture requires a supportive learning environment and teacher effort and artistry to create and maintain a community devoted to ideas and to idea improvement.”

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» The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy

» The Neuroscience of Resiliency: An Interview with Linda Graham - Mindfulness and Psychotherapy | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Linda Graham, author of Bouncing Back shares with us what we can do to wire a more resilient brain.
Peter Skillen's insight:

A lovely description of the role of the pre-frontal cortex as the CEO of resilience. Linda Graham recommends both mindfulness and empathy/compassion practices as means to strengthen resilience. 

 

She suggests, "The brain becomes more resilient any time we steadily cultivate the positive, pro-social emotions like gratitude, kindness, compassion, serenity, awe, delight, love."

 

Important for all of us. Let's get our students involved now -- if we really want them to 'be in charge of their own learning'!

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Paying Attention Is a Skill: Schools Need to Teach It

Paying Attention Is a Skill: Schools Need to Teach It | Mindful Education | Scoop.it

"By catering to diminished attention, we are making a colossal and unconscionable mistake. The world is a complex and subtle place, and efforts to understand it and improve it must match its complexity and subtlety. We are treating as unalterable a characteristic that can be changed. Yes, there is no point in publishing a long article if no one will read it to the end. The question is, what does it take to get people to read things to the end?

The key point for teachers and principals and parents to realize is that maintaining attention is a skill. It has to be trained, and it has to be practiced. If we cater to short attention spans by offering materials that can be managed with short attention spans, the skill will not develop. The “attention muscle” will not be exercised and strengthened. It is as if you complain to a personal trainer about your weak biceps and the trainer tells you not to lift heavy things. Just as we don’t expect people to develop their biceps by lifting two-pound weights, we can’t expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets, 200-word blog posts, or 300-word newspaper articles."


Via Howard Rheingold
Peter Skillen's insight:

I like Howard Rheingold's comment about this article.

"I have one very small but very important difference with the thesis of this article. Where the author says "we can't expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets..." I would insert the word "just," as in "we can't expect them to develop their attention just by reading 140-character tweets..." Attention and attentional skills are vulnerable and trainable along a spectrum of infotentional situations. And 18 minute videos about big ideas are a legitimate form of cultural expression, with a legitimate place on that spectrum. Where I do agree with the author is with his main prescription -- yes, I require my students to blog and tweet. I also expect them to spend hours each week reading longer and often considerably complex texts."

 

I agree that we need to focus on developing these attention skills - not just in school - but also in positive 'out of school' circumstances. I think of some of the individual sports in which I have been involved - either directly or through family members. As an avid rock climber in earlier days, I used to reflect on how in the 'zone' I could be - just how I could enter that 'state of flow' that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi espouses. I needed to very much 'attend' to the task at hand - not just for obvious reasons of safety!  In fact, the more I attended to the rockwall problem in front of me, the more successful I was in achieving the climb. If I let my attention wander, then success often eluded me.  (Mihaly would likely agree with me on this one - as he was also a climber in his younger days!)

 

Rigorous work or play exercises the attention muscle. Go for it.

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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:36 PM

I have one very small but very important difference with the thesis of this article. Where the author says "we can't expect them to develop their attention by reading 140-character tweets..." I would insert the word "just," as in "we can't expect them to develop their attention just by reading 140-character tweets..." Attention and attentional skills are vulnerable and trainable along a spectrum of infotentional situations. And 18 minute videos about big ideas are a legitimate form of cultural expression, with a legitimate place on that spectrum. Where I do agree with the author is with his main prescription -- yes, I require my students to blog and tweet. I also expect them to spend hours each week reading longer and often considerably complex texts.

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How Physical Fitness May Promote School Success

How Physical Fitness May Promote School Success | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Physically fit children absorb and retain new information more effectively than children who are out of shape, a new study finds, raising timely questions about the wisdom of slashing schools’ physical education programs.
Peter Skillen's insight:

Although I am less concerned with 'school scores' than I am with 'deep learning', I do believe we need to focus on this issue of fitness and exercise related to learning. If we truly want kids to 'take charge of their own learning', then they need to understand the biological effects of exercise on cognition and other aspects of self.

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New Research Says Mindful-Multitasking Leads to More Focus and Calm

New Research Says Mindful-Multitasking Leads to More Focus and Calm | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Part of the reason multitasking may lead to poorer cognitive performance is that stress can quickly get to a point where we experience diminishing returns.
Peter Skillen's insight:

If we are going to 'multitask', then we should do it mindfully, suggests this research.

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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | MindShift | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand might (RT @MindShiftKQED: How does multitasking affect the way kids learn?
Peter Skillen's insight:

Although this is a very complex issue - and one that is getting a great deal of attention these days - in some ways it is a 'no brainer'.  At the risk of simplifying it, each of us has a certain amount of mental energy to allocate. It saddens me when kids, in particular, "have greater difficulty transferring their learning to new contexts".

 

Instead of 'multitasking' with unused mental effort, I want kids to choose to direct the extra mental effort back into the task itself… evaluating effectiveness, determining better strategies, reflecting on generalizations to other similar, or different, domains.  ‘How am I doing?’ ‘What could I do differently next time?’ ‘How can I kick it up a notch?’ Thus they are reinvesting all your efforts into maximizing performance and generalizable skills.

 

More here in Can Students Multitask?

http://theconstructionzone.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/can-students-multitask/

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Marcia Powell's curator insight, May 21, 2013 9:37 AM

Double-edged sword here.  Kids are tied into the need for community so tightly that anxiety can result if they do not have access to their digital devices.  I make certain that kids are on-task by frequent walk-throughs, and conversations that promote respect among the student and myself.  I also realize that the relevancy of my class becomes paramount, so I encourage the kids to tweet or document moments in the classroom using digital platforms.  Students who do not have cell phones need to be tied in as well, using the laptops I have available, or a Kindle or ipod touch.   All students have access to digital devices and it creates opportunities to talk about appropriate usage.

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Education Conferences, Brain Based Learning, Professional Development For Teachers

Education Conferences, Brain Based Learning, Professional Development For Teachers | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Leading providers of brain based learning education conferences and professional development for teachers. (RT @amishijha: Will be speaking about curbing mind wandering and strengthening attention w mindfulness training.Join me May 4!
Peter Skillen's insight:

Learning and the Brain definitely runs some great events. Wish I could just be on the 'conference circuit' -- attending, chatting, dreaming and drifting.

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The Science of Passion Based Learning

The Science of Passion Based Learning | Mindful Education | Scoop.it
Teacher educator Peter Skillen reflects on the role of passion in learning, highlighting the research and reminding us that emotion energizes the brain. Mesmerize!
Peter Skillen's insight:

I'd be somewhat remiss if I didn't 'scoop' my own post to Scoop.it!! LOL 

 

But it is important to note:

I love that I was challenged for not elaborating on when to memorize and when to mesmerize!  I avoided that for this post. ;-)

 

Just really wanted to make the point that passion-based learning isn't all about motivation or engagement. It lights up cognitive processes that support the construction of new schema - throughout the mind/body.

 

(Also: I get to meet Eleanor Duckworth this summer at Constructing Modern Knowledge - http://constructingmodernknowledge.com Woohoo!)

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