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The 20-Minute Exercise To Eradicate Negative Thinking

The 20-Minute Exercise To Eradicate Negative Thinking | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Belief is contagious. It wins supporters. Its self-fulfilling. Here's how to get there when nagging negative thoughts are holding you back.

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Jill Barrett Melnicki's curator insight, November 17, 2013 8:06 PM

How?

1) Identify the belief

2) Idenfity the anchors (e.g. causes)

3) Pick a new belief

4) Release the anchors

5) Set your course

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Study finds that children raised without religion show more empathy and kindness

Study finds that children raised without religion show more empathy and kindness | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
A study conducted by the University of Chicago has found that children raised in non-religious households are kinder and more altruistic than those raised with religion.


The study which was published in the journal Current Biology looked at 1170 children between the ages of 5 and 12 years in six countries (Canada, China, Jordan, Turkey, USA, and South Africa) and examined “the religiousness of their household, and parent-reported child empathy and sensitivity to justice.”

 

The study found that “family religious identification decreases children’s altruistic behaviors” and “children from religious households are harsher in their punitive tendencies.”


 Across all countries, parents in religious households reported that their children expressed more empathy and sensitivity for justice in everyday life than non-religious parents.



by Dan Arel


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How To Boost Brain Function With Exercise

How To Boost Brain Function With Exercise | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Working out smart can make you, well, smarter

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Enabling Empathy : She categorizes Empathy into Emotional and Cognitive Empathy, giving us examples of both. Indi Young

Through her talk, Indi Young explains how we must ask and listen more as a means to get past our assumptions.

 

Absorbing eclectic ideas, understanding varied work patterns and incorporating different ways of thinking will help broader ideas sprout.

 

She categorizes Empathy into Emotional and Cognitive Empathy, giving us examples of both.

 


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Isabel Sellés Crespo's curator insight, October 18, 2015 1:20 PM

#SCEUNED15 Sobre la empatía emocional y cognitiva. 

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A Neuroscientist Argues That Everybody Is Misunderstanding Fear and Anxiety

A Neuroscientist Argues That Everybody Is Misunderstanding Fear and Anxiety | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
And he thinks it may be his fault.

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Gerald Carey's curator insight, July 23, 2015 8:05 PM

An interesting summary of Joseph LeDoux's latest book wondering if we have misunderstood the roots of fear and anxiety.

As the author says, "... fear and anxiety are not wired into the brain as basic responses to the world around us — rather, the responses that lead to them are, and they only coalesce into fear when the brain interprets them as such."

Jennifer Lynn's curator insight, January 11, 2016 6:38 AM

Though fear and anxiety are two different feelings, there is hardly any difference between the response of two. The feelings of fear and anxiety both depend upon the fundamental experiences of life. If you want to know how to deal with fear or anxiety, you need to know the difference between the two. Click on the following links to know, what is fear and anxiety: http://bit.ly/1OK96Lr http://bit.ly/1SJfRPy ;

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7 Ways Meditation Can Actually Change The Brain

7 Ways Meditation Can Actually Change The Brain | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Science is showing that meditation is very deserving of its newfound fame.

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Dave Vago's curator insight, February 15, 2015 8:47 PM

decent summary.

Margaret Mikkelborg's curator insight, February 16, 2015 1:16 PM

meditation is now being shown by science to reduce "monkey mind" - this is ancient knowledge that now has been given scientific credibility - of importance to those who feel they have been labelled with ADD 

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Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog

Men and Women Process Emotions in Different Ways: This Affects What They Remember — PsyBlog | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

Study of 3,000+ finds men and women process emotions differently and this affects what they remember. 

Women rate emotional images as more stimulating and are more likely to remember them than men, a new study finds.

While strong emotions tend to boost memory for both men and women, this neuroimaging study may help explain why women often outperform men on memory tests.

The results come from a very large study of 3,398 people who took part in four different trials.

Both men and women were asked to look at a series of pictures, some of which were emotionally arousing and others which were neutral.


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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, January 23, 2015 8:16 AM

The results, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, showed that women found the emotional pictures — and especially the negative pictures — more stimulating than the men...

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Human Emotion 8.1: Emotion and the Brain I (Affective Neuroscience)

Human Emotion; Professor June Gruber, Yale University 00:00 Chapter 1. Introduction to Lecture 01:32 Chapter 2. Tools to Study the Emotional Brain 09:58 Chap...
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Seeing Over the Horizon: Sharp Rise in Ocean Temperatures in 2013 - Energy Collective

Seeing Over the Horizon: Sharp Rise in Ocean Temperatures in 2013 - Energy Collective | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Energy Collective Seeing Over the Horizon: Sharp Rise in Ocean Temperatures in 2013 Energy Collective Figures released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (see the chart above), show a sharp rise in ocean surface temperatures in...
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we are so f****d!

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A new model of empathy: the rat

A new model of empathy: the rat | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
In a simple experiment, researchers sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.

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A Rising Empathy Gap Hurts the Poor—But Also the Economy

A Rising Empathy Gap Hurts the Poor—But Also the Economy | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

Discussion is growing of an empathy gap rooted in our society's dramatic increase in inequality. As David Madland argues in Democracy,...

 

Other research has confirmed this empathy gap. Last year, Paul Piff caused quite a stir when he published his finding that upper class individuals were, more likely to break driving laws, take goods from others, lie in a negotiation, cheat and endorse unethical behaviour (this, of course, stands at odd with Charles Murray's rather naive belief that the rich are rich because of their superior moral scruples). Piff summarizes his conclusions,

 

While having money doesn't necessarily make anybody anything, the rich are way more likely to prioritize their own self-interests above the interests of other people. It makes them more likely to exhibit characteristics that we would stereotypically associate with, say, assholes.

http://media.wix.com/ugd//80ea24_edd136e3b72b07c93775906aee3dfa35.pdf

 

Posted by Sean McElwee 


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Growing apart

Growing apart | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
A BARRAGE of new statistics on American living standards offers some grounds for optimism. A typical American household’s income has stopped falling for the first... (A sad state of American economics supported by too many in Congress.
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Steps to Turn Off the Nagging Self-Doubt in Your Head

Steps to Turn Off the Nagging Self-Doubt in Your Head | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Most of us lose a lot of time to negative thoughts; Surprisingly simple steps can help you reframe your thinking and feel more positive.
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Empathy in the Classroom: Why Should I Care?

Empathy in the Classroom: Why Should I Care? | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

3 Benefits of Empathy in Education

Empathyed.org quotes Tyler Colasante by defining empathy "as 'the intrapersonal realization of another's plight that illuminates the potential consequences of one's own actions on the lives of others' (as cited in Hollingsworth, 2003, p.146)." As educators, incorporating empathy into instruction can have positive results for your immediate classroom, as well as for the community outside of the school building.


Here’s why:

1. Empathy builds positive classroom culture
2. Empathy strengthens community.
3. Empathy prepares your students to be leaders in their community.Resources for Teaching Empathy

So now what? You're convinced that empathy is important to integrate in your curriculum, but where do you start?

 

 by Lauren Owen

 


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Studies Link Social Anxiety To Empathetic Ability, High IQs, & Sentinel Intelligence

Studies Link Social Anxiety To Empathetic Ability, High IQs, & Sentinel Intelligence | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

What if they are more aware of the things that are wrong with society and are more connected to the suffering in the world?  What if an anxious mind is a searching and connected mind? 


A very important study came out a few years ago linking social anxiety to increased empathetic abilities.  People who report suffering from social anxiety have an increased ability to feel and interpret the emotions and mental states of people around them.

 

Results support the hypothesis that high socially anxious individuals may demonstrate a unique social-cognitive abilities profile with elevated cognitive empathy tendencies and high accuracy in affective mental state attributions.


Steven Bancarz,


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Neuroscience: Connectomes make the map

Neuroscience: Connectomes make the map | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

The subjects studied by connectome researchers range from living people to the preserved brains of tiny animals such as worms and flies. The investigative technologies range from MRI scanners to light microscopes and electron microscopes. Irrespective of the specifics, scientists — with the aid of computers — painstakingly chart connections to build an atlas. The map-makers hope that revealing the connectome's structure will help neuroscientists to navigate as they work out how different parts of the brain function together.

 

Neuroscience: Connectomes make the map
Amber Dance
Nature 526, 147–149 (01 October 2015) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/526147a


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Why it hurts to see others suffer: pain and empathy linked in the brain

Why it hurts to see others suffer: pain and empathy linked in the brain | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Exploring empathy further

This is therefore consistent with the theory that empathy for pain occurs as a result of simulating another person’s feelings within one’s own brain. It also provides further evidence that the feelings of pain and pain empathy occur as a result of similar processes within the brain.

Further, patients who have damage and/or disease in the parts of the brain that fall within this network of pain-processing areas, often experience a reduction in ability to feel empathy for pain. This suggests that the ability to feel pain is necessary in order to experience empathy for pain.

 

Rebecca S. Dewey

Research Fellow in Neuroimaging, University of Nottingham


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Behavioural economics: How to 'nudge' customers and influence people

Behavioural economics: How to 'nudge' customers and influence people | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Behavioural economics posits that all behaviour, including in business, is shaped by irrational and unconscious influences

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The Neuroscience of Empathy

The Neuroscience of Empathy | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

Are some people born with a brain that is wired to be more empathetic? Can compassion be learned? What daily habits or life experiences reinforce selfishness, narcissism, and at a far extreme psychopathy?

Last night, I listened to an interview (link is external) with Madonna and Anderson Cooper talking about the importance of teaching our children to be able to empathize and to not be complacent about fighting against oppression and inequality.

 

Two studies in the past month have identified specific brain regions linked to empathy and compassion.

 

by Christopher Bergland 

Madonna Wants Fans to Revolt 
http://guardianlv.com/2013/10/madonna-wants-fans-to-revolt/
The performer spoke of the world’s degeneration and how people have lost consciousness of their fellow man and the lack of empathy today. She feels that the world’s population have become selfish and put their own wants and needs first. But despite this belief of the world not caring, she has faith in the “good of humanity” and she wants people to support one another without some sort of disaster initiating the act of caring. 


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Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick ~ Mind/Shift

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick ~ Mind/Shift | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it

by Katrina Schwartz

 

"Carol Dweck's research, which focuses on what makes people seek challenging tasks, persist through difficulty and do well over time, has shown that many girls believe their abilities are fixed, that individuals are born with gifts and can't change."


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Fish biomass in oceans 10 times more than believed - Zee News

Fish biomass in oceans 10 times more than believed - Zee News | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Nature World News
Fish biomass in oceans 10 times more than believed
Zee News
With a stock estimated at 1,000 million tons so far, mesopelagic fish dominate the total biomass of fish in the ocean.
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But this is good news...

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5 Common Mistakes Your Brain Makes Every Day

5 Common Mistakes Your Brain Makes Every Day | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Our brains are pretty amazing, but they can make a lot of mistakes that we are not even aware of. Sometimes these may have negative long-term consequences, but often they just mean a moment of misu...

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David McGavock's curator insight, February 7, 2014 10:23 AM

Some basic ways we misjudge situations and people. Good to remember as we go through day-day.

Karen Bowden's curator insight, February 10, 2014 10:23 AM

1. We trust our memories, even though they are often wrong.

2. We let our expectations decide what we're experiencing.

3. We feel losses more strongly than gains - which can lead to poor decision making.

4. We are highly prone to stereotyping people, even when we consciously try not to.

5. We are not great at predicting odds and probabilities, but we don't realize it.

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Finding Morality in Animals - evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism,

Finding Morality in Animals - evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism, | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
Two new books explore research on animals to better understand the roots of human morality and challenge human specialness.

 

In The Bonobo and the Atheist, renowned primatologist Frans de Waal argues that moral behavior in humans is not predicated on religion. Drawing from extensive research on animals—primarily bonobos and chimpanzees, our nearest primate relatives—as well as research on fossil records of early hominids, he shows how evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism, predate the advent religion by millennia and co-evolved in non-human primates as well as in humans....

 

Virginia Morell takes a slightly different, but related tack in her new book, Animal Wise: The Thoughts and Emotions of Our Fellow Creatures. Morell, a science writer...

 

By Jill Suttie 


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Caroline Hopper's curator insight, November 13, 2013 5:29 PM

Americans today tend to believe that human beings are somehow superior in their capacity to experience emotions.  I've always believed that animals feel sensations of excitement, sadness, love and disappointment. In this article,  Jill Suttie Argues that animals do feel human emotions.  According to Suttie, "evidence of moral sentiments, like empathy and altruism predate the advent of religion by millenia."  I agree that animals have a sense of morality, because my own experience owning pets confirms it.  When my cats misbehave, they know it and behave differenty to show it. In short, humans are not the only beings that have an emotional life.    

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Empathy 101

Empathy 101 | Mind, Place, Value | Scoop.it
“I like to understand how people see the world,” A CEO tells me. “It’s always different for each person. I’m fascinated by the ways people think about things, what’s important to them, how they put

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