Mind (un?)fitting the future
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Will we survive our technology?

Will we survive our technology? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Our technologies are becoming more powerful with each passing year — and with an eerie regularity. This has led some to believe that we're hurtling towards a sort of nexus point, the so-called Singularity.
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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Why is Artificial Intelligence Female?

Why is Artificial Intelligence Female? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Gendering AI boils down to business. Customers interpret these AI personalities through the lens of their own biases. Whether its stereotypes about women in service roles, the desire for a female companion, or simply that feeling of trust that a woman’s voice instills, female AI personalities are easier for most consumers to adopt. And adoption is the ultimate goal for tech companies that want to make AI mainstream.
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So you think you chose to read this article? - BBC News

So you think you chose to read this article? - BBC News | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
You may think you choose to read one story over another, or to watch a particular video rather than all the others clamouring for your attention.

But in truth, you are probably manipulated into doing so by publishers using clever machine learning algorithms.

The online battle for eyeballs has gone hi-tech.

Every day the web carries about 500,000 tweets, 300 hours of YouTube video uploads, and more than 80 million new Instagram photos every day. Just keeping up with our friends' Facebook and Twitter updates can seem like a full-time job.

So publishers desperately trying to get us to read and watch their stuff in the face of competition from viral videos and pictures of cats that look like Hitler are enlisting the help of data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI).

But do these technologies actually work?
A question of timing

Recent start-up Echobox has developed a system it says takes the human guesswork out of the mix. By analysing large amounts of data, it learns how specific audiences respond to different articles at different times of the day.

It then selects the best stories to post and the best times to post them.

Via Wildcat2030
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The Nordic Paradox

The main hypothesis advanced by Gracia and Merlo – and it’s only a hypothesis – is that high gender equality might create a backlash effect among men, triggering high levels of violence against women.
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"The main hypothesis advanced by Gracia and Merlo – and it’s only a hypothesis – is that high gender equality might create a backlash effect among men, triggering high levels of violence against women."
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Soon we’ll use science to make people more moral

Soon we’ll use science to make people more moral | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
"Moral enhancement" is only getting more sophisticated.
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The Danger of Safety Equipment

The Danger of Safety Equipment | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

".. This is known as the risk compensation effect, and it refers to the fact that people tend to take increased risks when using protective equipment. It’s been found among bicycle riders (people go faster when wearing helmets), taxi drivers and children running an obstacle course (safety gear leads kids to run more “recklessly.”) ...

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To Fight Poverty, Raise IQ Scores

To Fight Poverty, Raise IQ Scores | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Smarter people, on average, are more patient and interested in saving. And indeed national savings rates correlate with IQ scores.
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Study finds honesty varies significantly between countries

Study finds honesty varies significantly between countries | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has found that people's honesty varies significantly between countries.
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Eyewitness Testimony Is Unreliable… Or Is It?

Eyewitness Testimony Is Unreliable… Or Is It? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A new study of the data says it depends on timing.
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Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us by Cass R. Sunstein

Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us by Cass R. Sunstein | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Akerlof and Shiller use the word “phish” to mean a form of angling, by which phishermen (such as banks, drug companies, real estate agents, and cigarette companies) get phools (such as investors, sick people, homeowners, and smokers) to do something that is in the phisherman’s interest, but not in the phools’. There are two kinds of phools: informational and psychological. Informational phools are victimized by factual claims that are intentionally designed to deceive them (“it’s an old house, sure, but it just needs a few easy repairs”). More interesting are psychological phools, led astray either by their emotions (“this investment could make me rich within three months!”) or by cognitive biases (“real estate prices have gone up for the last twenty years, so they’re bound to go up for the next twenty as well”).
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Yes, You’re Irrational, and Yes, That’s OK - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus

Yes, You’re Irrational, and Yes, That’s OK - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
magine that (for some reason involving cultural tradition, family pressure, or a shotgun) you suddenly have to get married. Fortunately, there are two candidates. One is charming and a lion in bed but an idiot about money. The other has a reliable income and fantastic financial sense but is, on the other fronts, kind of meh. Which would you choose?

Sound like six of one, half-dozen of the other? Many would say so. But that can change when a third person is added to the mix. Suppose candidate number three has a meager income and isn’t as financially astute as choice number two. For many people, what was once a hard choice becomes easy: They’ll pick the better moneybags, forgetting about the candidate with sex appeal. On the other hand, if the third wheel is a schlumpier version of attractive number one, then it’s the sexier choice that wins in a landslide. This is known as the “decoy effect”—whoever gets an inferior competitor becomes more highly valued.

The decoy effect is just one example of people being swayed by what mainstream economists have traditionally considered irrelevant noise. After all, their community has, for a century or so, taught that the value you place on a thing arises from its intrinsic properties combined with your needs and desires. It is only recently that economics has reconciled with human psychology. The result is the booming field of behavioral economics, pioneered by Daniel Kahneman, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his longtime research partner, the late Amos Tversky, who was at Stanford University.

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Humans, Not Robots, Are the Real Reason Artificial Intelligence Is Scary

Humans, Not Robots, Are the Real Reason Artificial Intelligence Is Scary | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Intelligent weapons are too easily converted by software engineers into indiscriminate killing machines.

Via Spaceweaver
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Should Your Driverless Car Hit a Pedestrian to Save Your Life?

Should Your Driverless Car Hit a Pedestrian to Save Your Life? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Should Your Driverless Car Hit a Pedestrian to Save Your Life?
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Even Small Children Are Less Helpful after Touching Money

Even Small Children Are Less Helpful after Touching Money | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Merely touching money has the power to alter our behavior. Money makes us more selfish, less helpful, and less generous towards others. One experiment, for example, had a pedestrian drop a bus pass in front of people who had just gotten money out of a cash machine or merely walked past the machine. People who had gotten money out of the cash machine were less likely to alert the woman that she had dropped her pass. While money can hamper helpfulness, it also confers psychological advances in the form of making people more persistent and more successful at solving challenging problems.

Our own research reveals that handling money can trigger all these behaviors, in different cultures, at a surprisingly early age—3 years-old. Even the very young are less likely to lend a helping hand, after touching money, or to work harder at solving challenging problems like correctly solving a labyrinth. And, all this happens despite a relative lack of experience with money or knowledge of its value. Money has the power to shift behavior in desirable and undesirable ways even before children can understand that a dime is worth more than a nickel. We were surprised to discover that an everyday occurrence around the world—simply touching cash—can trigger changes in behavior so early on in life. These findings could have implications for achievement, generosity and interpersonal harmony.

We documented the effects of money on young children’s behavior in a series of experiments. In one experiment, we instructed some children to sort money by denomination, while others sorted buttons by color. They then went to a different room where their performance on a difficult task was put to the test. They were given a maze to solve and were told they could quit at any time. Money sorters worked longer and were more successful at solving the maze than button sorters. In another experiment, 3 year-olds sorted coins and banknotes, or buttons and paper slips, before moving to a different room. There they met an experimenter who asked for their help readying materials for the next child she would test. She gave them a basket and asked the children to bring her as many red crayons as they could from a box in the far corner of the room. Money sorters were less helpful, overall, than button and paper sorters.


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Scientists say there’s such a thing as “ethical amnesia” and it’s probably happened to you

Scientists say there’s such a thing as “ethical amnesia” and it’s probably happened to you | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Most of us like to think that we have moral standards, and there may be a psychological reason why.

A study published (paywall) today (May 16) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates that when we act unethically, we’re more likely to remember these actions less clearly. Researchers from Northwestern University and Harvard University coined the term “unethical amnesia” to describe this phenomenon, which they believe stems from the fact that memories of ourselves acting in ways we shouldn’t are uncomfortable.

“Unethical amnesia is driven by the desire to lower one’s distress that comes from acting unethically and to maintain a positive self-image as a moral individual,” the authors write in the paper.

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The Awesome Threat You Won't Hear About in America's Presidential Campaign

"We are, in fact swept up in a vast technological tsunami. It’s a tsunami bearing challenges as great as anything our species has ever known."


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Spaceweaver's curator insight, May 5, 3:48 PM
It's about the ongoing technological revolution that changes the face of the economy forever.
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Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us

Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
George Akerlof and Robert Shiller believe that once we understand human psychology, we will be a lot less enthusiastic about free markets and a lot more worried about the harmful effects of competition. In their view, companies exploit human weaknesses not necessarily because they are malicious or venal, but because the market makes them do it.
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Why Do People Fall for Pseudo-Profound Bullsh*t? | Big Think

Why Do People Fall for Pseudo-Profound Bullsh*t? | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Researchers assessed what makes someone likely to believe collections of randomly mixed buzzwords were "profound."
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Why are placebos getting more effective? - BBC News

Why are placebos getting more effective? - BBC News | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Research shows that over the last 25 years the difference in effectiveness between real drugs and these fake ones has narrowed - but more in the US than elsewhere.
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Sex robots are actually going to be good for humanity

Sex robots are actually going to be good for humanity | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
But just as we should avoid importing existing gender and sexual biases into future technology, so we should also be cautious not to import established prudishness. Lack of openness about sex and sexual identities has been a source of great mental and social anguish for many people, even entire societies, for centuries. The politics behind this lack of candor is very damaging.
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Pareidolia: Why People Keep Seeing Crazy Stuff on Mars - YouTube

Why do people supposedly see a woman in pictures sent from Mars by the Curiosity Rover? For the same reason that people see Pepe the Frog in their toast, or ...
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Older People More Easily Distracted than the Young

Older People More Easily Distracted than the Young | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A new study reports we tend to be more easily distracted as we age.
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