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The Ethics of Saving Lives With Autonomous Cars Are Far Murkier Than You Think | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

The Ethics of Saving Lives With Autonomous Cars Are Far Murkier Than You Think | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
There’s little doubt that robot cars could make a huge dent in the car-accident fatality rate, which is obviously a good thing -- isn’t it? Actually, the answer isn’t so simple.
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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Morality and the Idea of Progress in Silicon Valley

Morality and the Idea of Progress in Silicon Valley | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley's amorality problem arises from the blind faith many place in progress. The narrative of progress provides moral cover to the tech industry and lulls people into thinking they no lon...
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Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED

Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
90 percent of pet owners think of their dogs and cats as members of the family. These relationships have benefits. For example, in a survey by the American Animal Hospital Association, 40 percent of married female dog owners reported they received more emotional support from their pet than from their husband or their kids.
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The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
You don't have infinite money. Spend it on stuff that research says makes you happy.
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The Backfire Effect: When Correcting False Beliefs Has the Opposite of the Intended Effect | Big Think

The Backfire Effect: When Correcting False Beliefs Has the Opposite of the Intended Effect | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
How providing people with evidence about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines can backfire.
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Can We Trust Robot Cars to Make Hard Choices?

Can We Trust Robot Cars to Make Hard Choices? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The ethics of robot cars has been a hot topic recently. In particular, if a robot car encounters a situation where it is forced to hit one person or another—which should it choose and how does it m...
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Men Are More Narcissistic And Entitled Than Women, According To Science

Men Are More Narcissistic And Entitled Than Women, According To Science | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
New research has confirmed an age-old gender stereotype.
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Planting false memories fairly easy, psychologists find | Toronto Star

Planting false memories fairly easy, psychologists find | Toronto Star | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
New study bolsters notion that memory is fragile and aggressive police interrogations don’t always serve justice.

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, February 22, 4:26 PM

This is scary. Psychologists were able to implant false memories (some of them criminal in nature) into 70% of the participants in the study!

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Enhancing Virtues: Fairness (pt 1)

Enhancing Virtues: Fairness (pt 1) | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Our moral codes are rooted in preconscious feelings of disgust at people who hurt others, cheat, are disloyal, disobey authority, and violate social taboos. Some of these moral feelings support modern Enlightenment ideas of morality while others are in contradiction with modern values of individual rights and critical thought. By illuminating the ways that our value systems are shaped by prerational impulses we can make more conscious choices about how to build a fair society and practice the civic virtues of fairness and engaged citizenship.  But we also can begin to experiment with ways to enhance our moral reasoning with drugs and devices to become even better citizens than previously possible.
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Is the Professor Bossy or Brilliant? Much Depends on Gender

Is the Professor Bossy or Brilliant? Much Depends on Gender | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
An interactive chart of words taken from millions of student reviews of their instructors offers a vivid illustration of unconscious gender bias.
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Why the modern world is bad for your brain

Why the modern world is bad for your brain | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Multitasking is an essential skill in the era of email, text messages, Facebook and Twitter. But, argues neuroscientist Daniel J Levitin, it’s actually making us less efficient

Via Spaceweaver
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John Page's curator insight, January 25, 7:44 PM

This article speaks exactly about the title. It talks about how all of the things going on in the modern world is too much for our minds to handle because they are so busy. All of this multitasking produces stress which is not good for your body or your health. We have become robots that must check our phones or we will not be able to function, it talks about how if there is an email in the unread bin then our IQ goes down by up to 10 points. Media is very important in this because it will spread this and let people become aware of what we are doing to our brain.

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Virtual afterlives will transform humanity – Michael Graziano – Aeon

Virtual afterlives will transform humanity – Michael Graziano – Aeon | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The question is not whether we can upload our brains onto a computer, but what will become of us when we do
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Thinking of Your Own Mortality Prompts Altruistic Behavior | Big Think

Thinking of Your Own Mortality Prompts Altruistic Behavior | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
When presented with our own mortality, we become more giving, and happier as a result.
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Watch: Insider Trading, Cheating and Fixing in Exclusive Trailer For '(Dis)Honesty - The Truth About Lies'

Watch: Insider Trading, Cheating and Fixing in Exclusive Trailer For '(Dis)Honesty - The Truth About Lies' | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
No pants were set on fire during the making of this film.
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Can a philosophical problem tell if you’re a psychopath? | Genetic Literacy Project

Can a philosophical problem tell if you’re a psychopath? | Sally Adee | March 30, 2015 | Last Word On Nothing
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Altering brain chemistry makes us more sensitive to inequality

Altering brain chemistry makes us more sensitive to inequality | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
What if there were a pill that made you more compassionate? A new study finds that giving a drug that changes the neurochemical balance in the brain causes a greater willingness to engage in prosocial behaviors, such as ensuring that resources are divided more equally.
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Smart pills vs. motivation pills – is one morally worse than the other? | Practical Ethics

Smart pills vs. motivation pills – is one morally worse than the other? | Practical Ethics | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Imagine a huge pile of unwashed dishes reminds you that you should clean your kitchen. Would you rather take a pill that increases your ability to clean very elaborately or one that helps you get off the couch and actually bring yourself to start cleaning? No hard decision for me... Certain substances like methylphenidate can not only enhance cognition, but also motivation or, to be more precise, self-regulation. This is not too surprising as treating conditions associated with decreased self-regulation like ADHD often is a main purpose of such medication. However, while cognitive enhancement has been debated a lot, it seems that only now ethical debate turns to motivation enhancement as a potentially contentious topic. In their recent post on this blog, Hannah Maslen, Julian Savulescu, and Carin Hunt convincingly argue that “the advantage procured by reducing the subjective effort or psychological burden involved in persisting with cognitive or physical training may be substantially more beneficial than increasing one’s (latent) capacity to perform well, but leaving the aversiveness of training intact.” They conclude that “the most controversial human enhancement is not radical cognitive or physical enhancement. What is most controversial is the enhancement of the will and self-discipline. To have a will of iron is, in today’s world, an enormous advantage given the power technology affords.” I agree. Interestingly, many people seem to see matters differently. Tom Douglas, Felix Heise, Miles Hewstone, and I recently conducted an experiment, in which we investigated laypeople’s views on motivation enhancement as compared to cognitive enhancement. We found that motivation enhancement is seen as significantly less morally wrong than cognitive enhancement. Specifically, participants judged the behaviour of a student who uses enhancers while studying for exams as less wrong when this enhancer was described as “motivation pills; to be keener to study and overcome motivational problems” than when the purpose of this enhancer was described as “smart pills; to think faster and more clearly”. Moreover, we found a slight difference with regards to deservingness in favour of motivation enhancement. Participants tended to judge the student who uses “motivation pills” as more deserving of praise and success than the student uses “smart pills”. In other words, in the eyes of laypeople cognitive enhancement undermines deservingness somewhat more than motivation enhancement does. What we cannot tell yet is why lay people judge this way. Our data give a first indication that perceptions of unfairness might play a crucial role. Overall, participants tended to see advantages gained through enhancement as more unfair when it took the form of “smart pills” as compared to “motivation pills”. And the more individual participants deemed advantages acquired through enhancement as unfair, the more morally wrong they found this enhancement and the less deserving they deemed the user to be. However, our data don’t tell a clear causal story here – more research is needed to investigate the underlying psychological processes. Overall, however, it seems that lay people see motivation enhancement as less problematic than cognitive enhancement – a judgement I wouldn’t prematurely subscribe to.
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The rise and fall of cognitive skills

The rise and fall of cognitive skills | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists find that different parts of the brain work best at different ages.

Via Xaos
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Why Mornings Don’t Make You Moral - The New Yorker

Why Mornings Don’t Make You Moral - The New Yorker | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
We are different people at different hours of the day, but an early bird isn’t superior to a night owl.
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The Attention-Deficit-Disorder Economy - The New Yorker

The Attention-Deficit-Disorder Economy - The New Yorker | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
I was keen to read Haldane’s argument, and it turned out to go a good deal deeper than providing mere examples of workers wasting time on social-media sites. The main issue is a neurological one, Haldane suggests. Technological advances, and the ubiquity of always-on media, may be undermining one of the key psychological prerequisites for economic growth: patience, and the willingness to put off current gratification for future gains.
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People Value Resources More Consistently When They Are Scarce - Association for Psychological Science

People Value Resources More Consistently When They Are Scarce - Association for Psychological Science | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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Crossing the germ line – facing genetics' great taboo - opinion - 06 February 2015 - New Scientist

Crossing the germ line – facing genetics' great taboo - opinion - 06 February 2015 - New Scientist | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Let's stop drawing lines in the sand when it comes to genetically modifying people and talk about engineering everybody, says Michael Le Page
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The Myth of the Harmless Wrong

The Myth of the Harmless Wrong | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
It’s logically possible but psychologically rare.
Yissar's insight:

"But the truth is more complicated. Victims — like beauty — are often in the eye of the beholder."

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The Ethics Of The 'Singularity'

The Ethics Of The 'Singularity' | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
When machines, smarter than us, make machines smarter than them, futurists argue, the 'singularity' will have arrived. Commentator Alva Noë, a skeptic, wonders about imparting values — and control.
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IT's curator insight, January 27, 10:55 AM

Even weaker in nature are left to their fate and die or are killed