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Singularity University's Salim Ismail on the Age of Technological Disruption

"All of the structures that we use to run the world today— our civics, our politics, our legal systems, healthcare, education— are all structured for a world...
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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Ruby Wax on Neuroplasticity: "You're the Architect of Your Own Brain" | Big Think

Ruby Wax on Neuroplasticity: "You're the Architect of Your Own Brain" | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Ruby Wax gave up a career in comedy to study the brain. In this video, she explains the therapeutic qualities of neuroplasticity.
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Can an online quiz spot a psychopath?

Can an online quiz spot a psychopath? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Online quizzes claim to unmask the psychopaths among us. But just how accurate are these tests?
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Forget the internet of things – we need an internet of people

Forget the internet of things – we need an internet of people | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
From cars to umbrellas, everyday objects are becoming increasingly connected. But the question we need to ask is – should they be?
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Professor Nita Farahany on the ethical implications of neuroscience for the law

Professor Nita Farahany on the ethical implications of neuroscience for the law | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Renown academic and presidential advisor Nita Farahany recently spoke with BioEdge about neuroscience and the law.
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A.D.H.D. Drugs Are Equalizers in a Stressful World, If Used Properly

A.D.H.D. Drugs Are Equalizers in a Stressful World, If Used Properly | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Prohibition never works. The best approach is to learn more about the drugs, regulate them and teach people about them.
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Would You Vote for a Gay or Atheist President in 2016? | Big Think

Would You Vote for a Gay or Atheist President in 2016?  | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Americans are more likely to vote for a gay candidate than an atheist
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Morality and the Idea of Progress in Silicon Valley

Morality and the Idea of Progress in Silicon Valley | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Silicon Valley's amorality problem arises from the blind faith many place in progress. The narrative of progress provides moral cover to the tech industry and lulls people into thinking they no lon...
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Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED

Why People Care More About Pets Than Other Humans | WIRED | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
90 percent of pet owners think of their dogs and cats as members of the family. These relationships have benefits. For example, in a survey by the American Animal Hospital Association, 40 percent of married female dog owners reported they received more emotional support from their pet than from their husband or their kids.
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The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things

The Science Of Why You Should Spend Your Money On Experiences, Not Things | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
You don't have infinite money. Spend it on stuff that research says makes you happy.
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The Backfire Effect: When Correcting False Beliefs Has the Opposite of the Intended Effect | Big Think

The Backfire Effect: When Correcting False Beliefs Has the Opposite of the Intended Effect | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
How providing people with evidence about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines can backfire.
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Can We Trust Robot Cars to Make Hard Choices?

Can We Trust Robot Cars to Make Hard Choices? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The ethics of robot cars has been a hot topic recently. In particular, if a robot car encounters a situation where it is forced to hit one person or another—which should it choose and how does it m...
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Can an Algorithm Hire Better Than a Human?

Can an Algorithm Hire Better Than a Human? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Start-ups say they can eliminate biases and create more skilled and diverse workplaces, but data science will probably need human supervision.
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The Good, The Bad and The Robot: Experts Are Trying to Make Machines Be "Moral"

The Good, The Bad and The Robot: Experts Are Trying to Make Machines Be "Moral" | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Good vs. bad. Right vs. wrong. Human beings begin to learn the difference before we learn to speak—and thankfully so. We owe much of our success as a species to our capacity for moral reasoning. It’s the glue that holds human social groups together, the key to our fraught but effective ability to cooperate. We are (most believe) the lone moral agents on planet Earth—but this may not last. The day may come soon when we are forced to share this status with a new kind of being, one whose intelligen
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The Last Word On Nothing | The trolley and the psychopath

The Last Word On Nothing | The trolley and the psychopath | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Not only does a “utilitarian” response (“just kill the fat guy”) not actual reflect a utilitarian outlook, it may actually be driven by broad antisocial tendencies, such as lowered empathy and a reduced aversion to causing someone harm.
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"Not only does a “utilitarian” response (“just kill the fat guy”) not actual reflect a utilitarian outlook, it may actually be driven by broad antisocial tendencies, such as lowered empathy and a reduced aversion to causing someone harm." ...

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Using Adderall to Get Ahead, Not to Fight A.D.H.D.

Using Adderall to Get Ahead, Not to Fight A.D.H.D. | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
What will happen as more workers try to get an edge with stimulants intended to counteract attention deficit hyperactivity disorder?
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Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other

Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The psychological quirks that make it tricky to get an accurate read on someone's emotions
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Thinking of Your Own Mortality Prompts Altruistic Behavior | Big Think

Thinking of Your Own Mortality Prompts Altruistic Behavior | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
When presented with our own mortality, we become more giving, and happier as a result.
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Watch: Insider Trading, Cheating and Fixing in Exclusive Trailer For '(Dis)Honesty - The Truth About Lies'

Watch: Insider Trading, Cheating and Fixing in Exclusive Trailer For '(Dis)Honesty - The Truth About Lies' | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
No pants were set on fire during the making of this film.
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Can a philosophical problem tell if you’re a psychopath? | Genetic Literacy Project

Can a philosophical problem tell if you’re a psychopath? | Sally Adee | March 30, 2015 | Last Word On Nothing
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Altering brain chemistry makes us more sensitive to inequality

Altering brain chemistry makes us more sensitive to inequality | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
What if there were a pill that made you more compassionate? A new study finds that giving a drug that changes the neurochemical balance in the brain causes a greater willingness to engage in prosocial behaviors, such as ensuring that resources are divided more equally.
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Smart pills vs. motivation pills – is one morally worse than the other? | Practical Ethics

Smart pills vs. motivation pills – is one morally worse than the other? | Practical Ethics | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Imagine a huge pile of unwashed dishes reminds you that you should clean your kitchen. Would you rather take a pill that increases your ability to clean very elaborately or one that helps you get off the couch and actually bring yourself to start cleaning? No hard decision for me... Certain substances like methylphenidate can not only enhance cognition, but also motivation or, to be more precise, self-regulation. This is not too surprising as treating conditions associated with decreased self-regulation like ADHD often is a main purpose of such medication. However, while cognitive enhancement has been debated a lot, it seems that only now ethical debate turns to motivation enhancement as a potentially contentious topic. In their recent post on this blog, Hannah Maslen, Julian Savulescu, and Carin Hunt convincingly argue that “the advantage procured by reducing the subjective effort or psychological burden involved in persisting with cognitive or physical training may be substantially more beneficial than increasing one’s (latent) capacity to perform well, but leaving the aversiveness of training intact.” They conclude that “the most controversial human enhancement is not radical cognitive or physical enhancement. What is most controversial is the enhancement of the will and self-discipline. To have a will of iron is, in today’s world, an enormous advantage given the power technology affords.” I agree. Interestingly, many people seem to see matters differently. Tom Douglas, Felix Heise, Miles Hewstone, and I recently conducted an experiment, in which we investigated laypeople’s views on motivation enhancement as compared to cognitive enhancement. We found that motivation enhancement is seen as significantly less morally wrong than cognitive enhancement. Specifically, participants judged the behaviour of a student who uses enhancers while studying for exams as less wrong when this enhancer was described as “motivation pills; to be keener to study and overcome motivational problems” than when the purpose of this enhancer was described as “smart pills; to think faster and more clearly”. Moreover, we found a slight difference with regards to deservingness in favour of motivation enhancement. Participants tended to judge the student who uses “motivation pills” as more deserving of praise and success than the student uses “smart pills”. In other words, in the eyes of laypeople cognitive enhancement undermines deservingness somewhat more than motivation enhancement does. What we cannot tell yet is why lay people judge this way. Our data give a first indication that perceptions of unfairness might play a crucial role. Overall, participants tended to see advantages gained through enhancement as more unfair when it took the form of “smart pills” as compared to “motivation pills”. And the more individual participants deemed advantages acquired through enhancement as unfair, the more morally wrong they found this enhancement and the less deserving they deemed the user to be. However, our data don’t tell a clear causal story here – more research is needed to investigate the underlying psychological processes. Overall, however, it seems that lay people see motivation enhancement as less problematic than cognitive enhancement – a judgement I wouldn’t prematurely subscribe to.
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