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Singularity University's Salim Ismail on the Age of Technological Disruption

"All of the structures that we use to run the world today— our civics, our politics, our legal systems, healthcare, education— are all structured for a world...
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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Why America's favorite anarchist thinks most American workers are slaves | Making Sen$e | PBS NewsHour

Why America's favorite anarchist thinks most American workers are slaves | Making Sen$e | PBS NewsHour | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Could a guaranteed basic income give rise to another band like the Beatles? Or support a scientific breakthrough like the light bulb? Occupy activist David Graeber thinks a lump sum basic income would liberate workers to do the work they want to do. And that would benefit all of society. Continue reading →
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What It’s Like to Spend 20 Years Listening to Psychopaths for Science | Science | WIRED

What It’s Like to Spend 20 Years Listening to Psychopaths for Science | Science | WIRED | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Kent Kiehl has been interviewing psychopaths for more than 20 years. More recently he's acquired a mobile MRI scanner and permission to scan the brains of New Mexico state prison inmates. He talked with WIRED about what's different in the brains of psychopaths and why he views psychopathy as a preventable mental disorder.
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Kansas City Shootings: Why Hate Crime Won't Go Away | TIME

Kansas City Shootings: Why Hate Crime Won't Go Away | TIME | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
There's enough evidence to charge Frazier Glenn Cross for a hate crime after Sunday's deadly shooting at a Jewish community center and senior living facility. Here's why crimes based on biases can be harder to combat than other violent crimes
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"Contrary to what sociologists believed for years — that hate crimes are fueled by economic pressures as new groups received benefits or better jobs – the driving force may be something more basic to human nature: our tendency to feel threatened in the face of change. "

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The Global Search for Education: Education and Jobs

The Global Search for Education: Education and Jobs | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
"The Future of Employment study makes clear that what matters most today is what you can do with what you know, rather than how much you know."
- Dr. Tony Wagner



What does today's technology mean for tomorrow's jobs and how can we bett...
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Toward a Pill That Helps Us Learn as Fast as Kids

Toward a Pill That Helps Us Learn as Fast as Kids | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Scientists are using mood drugs to return the adult's brain to an earlier stage of development. Here's why that won't be easy.
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Let’s get rid of the term “Hard Wired” | BrainFacts.org Blog

Let’s get rid of the term “Hard Wired” | BrainFacts.org Blog | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist | World Future Society

162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist | World Future Society | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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Behavioural economics and public policy - FT.com

Behavioural economics and public policy - FT.com | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The past decade has been a triumph for behavioural economics, the fashionable cross-breed of psychology and economics. First there was the award in 2002 of the Nobel Memorial Prize in economics to a psychologist, Daniel Kahneman – the man who did as
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Animals could help reveal why humans fall for illusions

Animals could help reveal why humans fall for illusions | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Visual illusions, such as the rabbit-duck (shown above) and café wall (shown below) are fascinating because they remind us of the discrepancy between perception and reality. But our knowledge of such illusions…

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, March 22, 12:40 AM

A decent summary of some of the more recent thoughts on what illusions can tell us.

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20 Crucial Terms Every 21st Century Futurist Should Know

20 Crucial Terms Every 21st Century Futurist Should Know | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
We live in an era of accelerating change, when scientific and technological advancements are arriving rapidly. As a result, we are developing a new language to describe our civilization as it evolves. Here are 20 terms and concepts that you'll need to navigate our future.
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Meet the 'Most Connected Man' in the World

Meet the 'Most Connected Man' in the World | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

And you thought managing a smartphone and an inbox was exhausting.

45-year-old Chris Dancy is known as the most connected man in the world. He has between 300 and 700 systems running at any given time, systems that capture real-time data about his life.

His wrists are covered with a variety of wearable technology, including the fitness wristband tracker Fitbit and the Pebble smartwatch. He weighs himself on the Aria Wi-Fi scale, uses smartphone controlled Hue lighting at home and sleeps on a Beddit mattress cover to track his sleep.


Via Spaceweaver
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The ethics of genetically enhanced monkey-slaves | TED Blog

The ethics of genetically enhanced monkey-slaves | TED Blog | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Professor of practical ethics, Julian Savulescu shares his thinking on the ethics of the biological enhancement of the human race.
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Article introduction: "Think parents should be able to select their children’s talents and personalities? Or want to run and hide in the woods at the thought of it? Whatever your opinion, it is precisely the kind of question that Julian Savulescu wants you to take seriously. Professor of practical ethics at the University of Oxford, Savulescu thinks deeply about the ethics of the biological enhancement of the human race. In his view, not only should you stop fearing such changes, you should consider them for yourself. In fact, he argues, you may even have an ethical responsibility to genetically modify your children."

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Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human - Forbes

Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human - Forbes | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Why The Future Of Technology Is All Too Human
Forbes
When Ray Kurzweil published The Age Of Spiritual Machines in 1999, he predicted a new era of thinking machines that will meet and then exceed human intelligence.
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Americans Aren’t Ready for the Future Google and Amazon Want to Build | Business | WIRED

Americans Aren’t Ready for the Future Google and Amazon Want to Build | Business | WIRED | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A new study out of Pew Research Center shows how Americans view the future of tech and what they're not quite ready for.

 

Americans are hopeful about the future of technology. But don’t release the drones just yet. And forget meat grown in a petri dish.

Pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready can have real bottom-line consequences.

That’s the takeaway from a new study released by the Pew Research Center looking at how U.S. residents felt about possible high-tech advances looming in the not-too-distant future. Overall, a decisive majority of those surveyed believed new tech would make the future better. At the same time, the public doesn’t seem quite ready for many of the advances companies like Google and Amazon are pushing hard to make real.

If the stigma surrounding Google Glass (or, perhaps more specifically, “Glassholes”) has taught us anything, it’s that no matter how revolutionary technology may be, ultimately its success or failure ride on public perception. Many promising technological developments have died because they were ahead of their times. During a cultural moment when the alleged arrogance of some tech companies is creating a serious image problem, the risk of pushing new tech on a public that isn’t ready could have real bottom-line consequences.


Via Wildcat2030
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Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines

Coming to Terms With Humanity's Inevitable Union With Machines | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Our robot overlords are already here. We’re just anthropomorphizing our technology in more subtle ways than we’d imagined in the past.

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Spaceweaver's curator insight, April 15, 5:42 AM

Interesting entry with a human psychological angle.

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, April 15, 4:38 PM

“What it means to be human and the evolution of humanity is changing so rapidly that we’re kind of at a different stage of being human. There’s not a lot of distinction between the natural and artificial any more,” says Colin Marchon, an NYU student and documentary filmmaker."

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Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast

Consciousness Might Emerge from a Data Broadcast | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
What is consciousness? A neuroscientist's new book argues that it arises when information is broadcast throughout the brain

Quantum physicist Wolfgang Pauli expressed disdain for sloppy, nonsensical theories by denigrating them as “not even wrong,” meaning they were just empty conjectures that could be quickly dismissed. Unfortunately, many remarkably popular theories of consciousness are of this ilk—the idea, for instance, that our experiences can somehow be explained by the quantum theory that Pauli himself helped to formulate in the early 20th century. An even more far-fetched idea holds that consciousness emerged only a few thousand years ago, when humans realized that the voices in their head came not from the gods but from their own internal spoken narratives.

Not every theory of consciousness, however, can be dismissed as just so much intellectual flapdoodle. During the past several decades, two distinct frameworks for explaining what consciousness is and how the brain produces it have emerged, each compelling in its own way. Each framework seeks to explain a vast storehouse of observations from both neurological patients and sophisticated laboratory experiments.

 

keep on reading..


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Jose M Quiroz's curator insight, April 13, 11:14 PM

just as this article emphasizes,  the consciousness is incredibly difficult to analyze. To be said is that we as humans are most likely to want an answer for what can't be answered yet; even if that requires implanting sensory devices in peoples skulls, and brains to discover what is yet to be answered. In this case it is a confusing material just as psychology is in great part gray area, indeed the conscious could be explained as the process of storing data to later be processed and used in the required way it is needed.

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Can we design machines to automate ethics? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon

Can we design machines to automate ethics? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
When is it right to hand our decisions over to machines? And when is automated ethics a step too far?
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BioEdge: Savulescu - We have a moral obligation to increase the intelligence of our children

BioEdge: Savulescu - We have a moral obligation to increase the intelligence of our children | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Oxford bioethicist Julian Savulescu calls for genetic screening of the unborn for IQ genes.
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What’s the Value of a Dollar? It Depends on How You Perceive Numbers - Association for Psychological Science

What’s the Value of a Dollar? It Depends on How You Perceive Numbers - Association for Psychological Science | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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The thought father: Nobel Prize-winning economist Daniel Kahneman on luck - Evening Standard

The thought father: Nobel Prize-winning economist Daniel Kahneman on luck - Evening Standard | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Evening Standard
The thought father: Nobel Prize-winning economist Daniel Kahneman on luck
Evening Standard
His theories of dual-speed processing and heuristics are to cognitive psychology what Darwin's theory of evolution was to biology.

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IARPA - The INSTINCT Challenge

IARPA - The INSTINCT Challenge | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon

Should biotech make life hellish for criminals? – Ross Andersen – Aeon | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Radical life extension would give humans the power to create an artificial hell for criminals. Should we?

Via Wildcat2030
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Wildcat2030's curator insight, March 13, 5:23 AM

brilliant read..

Artur Alves's curator insight, March 18, 4:59 AM

Interview with Rachel Roache.

 

"I wanted to close by moving beyond imprisonment, to ask you about the future of punishment more broadly. Are there any alternative punishments that technology might enable, and that you can see on the horizon now? What surprising things might we see down the line?


Roache: We have been thinking a lot about surveillance and punishment lately. Already, we see governments using ankle bracelets to track people in various ways, and many of them are fairly elaborate. For instance, some of these devices allow you to commute to work, but they also give you a curfew and keep a close eye on your location. You can imagine this being refined further, so that your ankle bracelet bans you from entering establishments that sell alcohol. This could be used to punish people who happen to like going to pubs, or it could be used to reform severe alcoholics. Either way, technologies of this sort seem to be edging up to a level of behaviour control that makes some people uneasy, due to questions about personal autonomy.

It’s one thing to lose your personal liberty as a result of being confined in a prison, but you are still allowed to believe whatever you want while you are in there. In the UK, for instance, you cannot withhold religious manuscripts from a prisoner unless you have a very good reason. These concerns about autonomy become particularly potent when you start talking about brain implants that could potentially control behaviour directly. The classic example is Robert G Heath [a psychiatrist at Tulane University in New Orleans], who did this famously creepy experiment [in the 1950s] using electrodes in the brain in an attempt to modify behaviour in people who were prone to violent psychosis. The electrodes were ostensibly being used to treat the patients, but he was also, rather gleefully, trying to move them in a socially approved direction. You can really see that in his infamous [1972] paper on ‘curing’ homosexuals. I think most Western societies would say ‘no thanks’ to that kind of punishment.

To me, these questions about technology are interesting because they force us to rethink the truisms we currently hold about punishment. When we ask ourselves whether it’s inhumane to inflict a certain technology on someone, we have to make sure it’s not just the unfamiliarity that spooks us. And more importantly, we have to ask ourselves whether punishments like imprisonment are only considered humane because they are familiar, because we’ve all grown up in a world where imprisonment is what happens to people who commit crimes. Is it really OK to lock someone up for the best part of the only life they will ever have, or might it be more humane to tinker with their brains and set them free? When we ask that question, the goal isn’t simply to imagine a bunch of futuristic punishments – the goal is to look at today’s punishments through the lens of the future."

Sinaia Sinai's curator insight, March 25, 1:13 AM

Yes, brilliant read.

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How to win wars by influencing people's behaviour

How to win wars by influencing people's behaviour | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
When terrorism is staged for YouTube and all sides are media-savvy, the military is turning to the behavioural sciences for help, writes Vaughan Bell
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What Will Happen to Our Minds in the Future?

What Will Happen to Our Minds in the Future? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Mind reading machines! Telekinesis! In Michio Kaku’s new book our minds will be doing all kinds of cool things with gadgets very, very soon, but somehow this scientist misses the big questions about what we really know about consciousness and the mind.
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Can We Avoid a Surveillance State Dystopia? - Charlie's Diary - By Ramez Naam

Can We Avoid a Surveillance State Dystopia? - Charlie's Diary - By Ramez Naam | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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