Mind (un?)fitting the future
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PLOS ONE: Lifting the Veil of Morality: Choice Blindness and Attitude Reversals on a Self-Transforming Survey

PLOS ONE: Lifting the Veil of Morality: Choice Blindness and Attitude Reversals on a Self-Transforming Survey | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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Thinking with Guts vs. Brains: What is Confirmation Bias?

Thinking with Guts vs. Brains: What is Confirmation Bias? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Why do you believe the things that you believe? We like to think that our beliefs are our own, formed from our unique, individual experiences, informed by our own logic, devoid of outside bias. But &…
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Confirmation Bias: How Intelligent People Develop Totally Incorrect Beliefs - PsyBlog

Confirmation Bias: How Intelligent People Develop Totally Incorrect Beliefs - PsyBlog | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Study debunks long-held myth probably arising from the confirmation bias.
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5 cognitive biases common to radiology—and how to beat them back

5 cognitive biases common to radiology—and how to beat them back | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Cognitive bias accounts for as much as three-quarters of malpractice suits filed against radiologists, according to findings published in 2013. A new paper lays out some ways rads can leverage quality-improvement (QI) projects to help steer clear of such mental shortcuts before they lead to missed or inaccurate diagnoses.
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Empathy Can Prolong Suffering – Use Compassion Instead

Oasis had it right: stop crying your heart out. Psychologist Paul Bloom argues that empathy may be working against our best interests, and that compassion may be a better strategy.
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Intensions Study: The Future of Work

Intensions Study: The Future of Work | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The study, which surveyed 2299 adults across Canada, found that a quarter (26%) of Canadian adults believe an unbiased computer program would be more trustworthy and ethical than their workplace leaders and managers. Among younger adults (those aged 20-39) that number was significantly higher, with 31% agreeing that an unbiased computer program would be more trustworthy and ethical than their workplace leaders and managers
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The optimism bias

The optimism bias | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Are we born to be optimistic, rather than realistic? Tali Sharot shares new research that suggests our brains are wired to look on the bright side -- and how that can be both dangerous and beneficial.
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Human brain is predisposed to negative stereotypes, new study suggests

Human brain is predisposed to negative stereotypes, new study suggests | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Brain responds more strongly to information about unfavourably portrayed groups, offering clues as to how prejudice emerges and spreads, research shows
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The things you remember best happened when you were between 15 and 25 – here's why

The things you remember best happened when you were between 15 and 25 – here's why | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Our own research has suggested something different, that it arises because this is the period when we lay down memories and store information that will define who we are for the rest of our lives – the crystallisation of the self in memory, if you like. We set out to test whether this was correct.
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How liars create the illusion of truth

How liars create the illusion of truth | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Repetition makes a fact seem more true, regardless of whether it is or not. Understanding this effect can help you avoid falling for propaganda, says psychologist Tom Stafford. “Repeat a lie often enough and it becomes the truth”, is a law of propaganda often attributed to the Nazi Joseph Goebbels. Among psychologists something like this…

Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, November 11, 2016 5:18 PM
An article on the 'illusion of truth' effect - what causes it and how we can guard against it.
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Why Nokia Couldn't Beat the IPhone

Why Nokia Couldn't Beat the IPhone | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
From the book:

We understood the problem, but at some deep level we couldn’t accept what was happening. Many big projects just carried on. We examined the sales projections for the following quarter, when our eyes should have been focused much further ahead.
And:

The worst that can happen to a company is to run out of money and be forced into bankruptcy. Enormous success is perhaps the next worst.
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Liar, Liar: How the Brain Adapts to Telling Tall Tales

Liar, Liar: How the Brain Adapts to Telling Tall Tales | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Neural responses decline after repeated acts of dishonesty, research suggests
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The Difference Between Rationality and Intelligence

The Difference Between Rationality and Intelligence | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
One is raw cognitive horsepower. The other is the propensity for reflective thought.
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Modern philosophy shows that most atrocities are committed by normal people—not evil ones

Modern philosophy shows that most atrocities are committed by normal people—not evil ones | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
That decency always overcomes evil is an axiom of American exceptionalism. We gird ourselves with quotes about the “arc of history,” spoken by exceptional individuals or presidents who were ‘presidential,’ and wait for history to bend. When we—the people Donald Trump has in mind as the “true Americans”—think about past atrocities like American segregation or Nazi Germany
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How Can We Tell if Our Love for Apple is Logical or Biased? - The Mac Observer

How Can We Tell if Our Love for Apple is Logical or Biased? - The Mac Observer | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
How do we know when our love for a company or product is genuine? Or mere cognitive bias?
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How Cognitive Biases Can Mess With Your Management Skills

How Cognitive Biases Can Mess With Your Management Skills | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
If you want to make better decisions read on and find out how human error can be avoided with a little thought.
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echo chambers: old psych, new tech

echo chambers: old psych, new tech | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
If you were surprised by the result of the Brexit vote in the UK or by the Trump victory in the US, you might live in an echo chamber – a self-reinforcing world of people who share the same opinions as you. Echo chambers are a problem, and not just because it means some people…
Via FastTFriend
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Mental Bias Puts Airport Security at Risk, and This Tech Could Help

Mental Bias Puts Airport Security at Risk, and This Tech Could Help | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

First identified in the field of radiology, where the detection of abnormalities in X-rays can be a matter of life or death, SOS (Satisfaction of Search) - originally referred to situations where the doctor feels "satisfied" that he or she has found the problem and moves on to the next image. Of course, pneumonia doesn't  preclude a patient from also having a tumor or some other issue, for example, so calling off the search too early can be a grave error, doctors have found.

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13 Cognitive Biases That Really Screw Things Up For You | The Huffington Post

13 Cognitive Biases That Really Screw Things Up For You | The Huffington Post | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
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The depressing thing that humans and pigs have in common

The depressing thing that humans and pigs have in common | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
It turns out that pigs make arbitrary decisions for some of the same reasons humans do. They get moody and peevish, and they allow those feelings to dictate judgement. By subjecting pigs to a series of experiments involving chocolate candies and uncomfortable beds, a group of UK researchers determined that pigs have some of the same psychological blind spots as humans.
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Debias Yourself

Debias Yourself | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Yissar's insight:
While I understand the reasons behind this tool, is this the right solution for fighting bias?
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This is the natural cognitive bias that Donald Trump leveraged to win

This is the natural cognitive bias that Donald Trump leveraged to win | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Students of psychology, and in particular of cognitive biases, will generally find Trump’s success in this regard unsurprising. Trump benefited—intentionally or not—from a phenomenon that marketers have known about for years. Psychologists call it “affect heuristic,” or the tendency to make judgments based on mood or emotion. The net result of this built-in human mental trait is that rather than letting our beliefs about the world tell us how to feel, we tend to let our emotions tell us what to believe. Afraid of crime? Then you’ll tend to see the world as violent (even if violent crime is at its lowest point in a generation or more). Worried about your job? Then you’ll believe that unemployment is up (even if it’s at at a 10-year low). Trump capitalized on this by telling Americans things they felt were true. And feeling is much more compelling than listening to eggheads spout statistics on television.
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13 Cognitive Biases That Really Screw Things Up For You

13 Cognitive Biases That Really Screw Things Up For You | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A Queensland University study found that blonde women earned, on average, 7% higher salaries than redheads and brunettes.
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Fact-checking Clinton and Trump is not enough

Fact-checking Clinton and Trump is not enough | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
How candidates say things matters just as much as whether they stuck to the facts.
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