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Moral Enhancement | Issue 91 | Philosophy Now

Moral Enhancement | Issue 91 | Philosophy Now | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Julian Savulescu and Ingmar Persson argue that artificial moral enhancement is now essential if humanity is to avoid catastrophe.
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Mind (un?)fitting the future
Humanity needs a new design and architecture of mind to fit the future
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The Danger of Safety Equipment

The Danger of Safety Equipment | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it

".. This is known as the risk compensation effect, and it refers to the fact that people tend to take increased risks when using protective equipment. It’s been found among bicycle riders (people go faster when wearing helmets), taxi drivers and children running an obstacle course (safety gear leads kids to run more “recklessly.”) ...

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To Fight Poverty, Raise IQ Scores

To Fight Poverty, Raise IQ Scores | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Smarter people, on average, are more patient and interested in saving. And indeed national savings rates correlate with IQ scores.
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Study finds honesty varies significantly between countries

Study finds honesty varies significantly between countries | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has found that people's honesty varies significantly between countries.
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Eyewitness Testimony Is Unreliable… Or Is It?

Eyewitness Testimony Is Unreliable… Or Is It? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A new study of the data says it depends on timing.
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Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us by Cass R. Sunstein

Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us by Cass R. Sunstein | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Akerlof and Shiller use the word “phish” to mean a form of angling, by which phishermen (such as banks, drug companies, real estate agents, and cigarette companies) get phools (such as investors, sick people, homeowners, and smokers) to do something that is in the phisherman’s interest, but not in the phools’. There are two kinds of phools: informational and psychological. Informational phools are victimized by factual claims that are intentionally designed to deceive them (“it’s an old house, sure, but it just needs a few easy repairs”). More interesting are psychological phools, led astray either by their emotions (“this investment could make me rich within three months!”) or by cognitive biases (“real estate prices have gone up for the last twenty years, so they’re bound to go up for the next twenty as well”).
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Yes, You’re Irrational, and Yes, That’s OK - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus

Yes, You’re Irrational, and Yes, That’s OK - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
magine that (for some reason involving cultural tradition, family pressure, or a shotgun) you suddenly have to get married. Fortunately, there are two candidates. One is charming and a lion in bed but an idiot about money. The other has a reliable income and fantastic financial sense but is, on the other fronts, kind of meh. Which would you choose?

Sound like six of one, half-dozen of the other? Many would say so. But that can change when a third person is added to the mix. Suppose candidate number three has a meager income and isn’t as financially astute as choice number two. For many people, what was once a hard choice becomes easy: They’ll pick the better moneybags, forgetting about the candidate with sex appeal. On the other hand, if the third wheel is a schlumpier version of attractive number one, then it’s the sexier choice that wins in a landslide. This is known as the “decoy effect”—whoever gets an inferior competitor becomes more highly valued.

The decoy effect is just one example of people being swayed by what mainstream economists have traditionally considered irrelevant noise. After all, their community has, for a century or so, taught that the value you place on a thing arises from its intrinsic properties combined with your needs and desires. It is only recently that economics has reconciled with human psychology. The result is the booming field of behavioral economics, pioneered by Daniel Kahneman, a psychologist at Princeton University, and his longtime research partner, the late Amos Tversky, who was at Stanford University.

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Humans, Not Robots, Are the Real Reason Artificial Intelligence Is Scary

Humans, Not Robots, Are the Real Reason Artificial Intelligence Is Scary | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Intelligent weapons are too easily converted by software engineers into indiscriminate killing machines.

Via Spaceweaver
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Neuroscience: In the blink of an I : Nature : Nature Publishing Group

Neuroscience: In the blink of an I : Nature : Nature Publishing Group | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Douwe Draaisma is impressed by a study on the science behind 'maladies of the self'.
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Can we design machines to automate ethics? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon

Can we design machines to automate ethics? – Tom Chatfield – Aeon | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Automation, in this context, is a force pushing old principles towards breaking point. If I can build a car that will automatically avoid killing a bus full of children, albeit at great risk to its driver’s life, should any driver be given the option of disabling this setting? And why stop there: in a world that we can increasingly automate beyond our reaction times and instinctual reasoning, should we trust ourselves even to conduct an assessment in the first place?

Beyond the philosophical friction, this last question suggests another reason why many people find the trolley disturbing: because its consequentialist resolution presents not only the possibility that an ethically superior action might be calculable via algorithm (not in itself a controversial claim) but also that the right algorithm can itself be an ethically superior entity to us.
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Common medications sway moral judgment

Common medications sway moral judgment | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Serotonin and dopamine drugs may change willingness to inflict harm on self and others
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Ruby Wax on Neuroplasticity: "You're the Architect of Your Own Brain" | Big Think

Ruby Wax on Neuroplasticity: "You're the Architect of Your Own Brain" | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Ruby Wax gave up a career in comedy to study the brain. In this video, she explains the therapeutic qualities of neuroplasticity.
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Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us

Why Free Markets Make Fools of Us | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
George Akerlof and Robert Shiller believe that once we understand human psychology, we will be a lot less enthusiastic about free markets and a lot more worried about the harmful effects of competition. In their view, companies exploit human weaknesses not necessarily because they are malicious or venal, but because the market makes them do it.
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Why Do People Fall for Pseudo-Profound Bullsh*t? | Big Think

Why Do People Fall for Pseudo-Profound Bullsh*t? | Big Think | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Researchers assessed what makes someone likely to believe collections of randomly mixed buzzwords were "profound."
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Why are placebos getting more effective? - BBC News

Why are placebos getting more effective? - BBC News | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Research shows that over the last 25 years the difference in effectiveness between real drugs and these fake ones has narrowed - but more in the US than elsewhere.
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Sex robots are actually going to be good for humanity

Sex robots are actually going to be good for humanity | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
But just as we should avoid importing existing gender and sexual biases into future technology, so we should also be cautious not to import established prudishness. Lack of openness about sex and sexual identities has been a source of great mental and social anguish for many people, even entire societies, for centuries. The politics behind this lack of candor is very damaging.
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Pareidolia: Why People Keep Seeing Crazy Stuff on Mars - YouTube

Why do people supposedly see a woman in pictures sent from Mars by the Curiosity Rover? For the same reason that people see Pepe the Frog in their toast, or ...
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Older People More Easily Distracted than the Young

Older People More Easily Distracted than the Young | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
A new study reports we tend to be more easily distracted as we age.
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Emotions Directly Influence Learning and Memory Processes

Emotions Directly Influence Learning and Memory Processes | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Researchers report emotions directly influence the neurological processes associated with memory and learning.
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So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What?

So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Scientists are working on ways to train our brains away from deeply held prejudices — including hacking your subconscious while you sleep.
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How Algorithms Can Beat Back Prejudice in Companies and Courts

How Algorithms Can Beat Back Prejudice in Companies and Courts | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
The way the justice system sets bail for defendants is far from a hard science, and th
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Can an Algorithm Hire Better Than a Human?

Can an Algorithm Hire Better Than a Human? | Mind (un?)fitting the future | Scoop.it
Start-ups say they can eliminate biases and create more skilled and diverse workplaces, but data science will probably need human supervision.
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