Mind Candy { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square
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EYE CANDY: Short Silent Film

 

 

A trip on the road at supersonic speed spanning across five continents and four seasons. Official video for "Chemin Vert" of electronic musician A Ghost Train. The video was made using panoramic frames from Google Street View from different parts of the world mapped as stereographic projections. If you have a fast computer with a powerful graphic card, make sure to try also the immersive, interactive version on: http://www.jamez.it/project/chemin-vert/ Video:…

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{Year: 1914} Message found in bottle Set Adrift 98 Years Ago

{Year: 1914}  Message found in bottle Set Adrift 98 Years Ago | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
A Scottish fisherman sets a world record after finding a bottle carrying a message in the ocean for almost 98 years.

 

A North Sea fisherman has set a world record by scooping up a bottle that has carried a message in the ocean for almost 98 years.

 

 

CAPTIONBy Scottish Government, AP

The bottle, found east of the Shetland Island off Scotland's northern coast, was among 1,890 released all at one time in a government experiment to map the undercurrents of the seas around Scotland, the BBC reports. Only 315 have been found.

 

Fisherman Andrew Leaper, skipper of the Copious, found the bottle — which was set adrift in 1914 — in his nets in April.

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Evolutionary Marker? --Robot to Take the University of Tokyo Math Entrance Exam

Evolutionary Marker? --Robot to Take the University of Tokyo Math Entrance Exam | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Artifical intelliegence will surpass human intelligence after 2020, predicts Vernor Vinge, 62, a pioneer in AI, who in a recent interview warned about the risks and opportunities that an electronic super-intelligence would offer to mankind.
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16 September, 2012: Sunday, the first day of official "Unmarried and Single Americans Week"

Forty-four percent of the U.S. adult population was single in 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau said Sunday, the first day of Unmarried and Single Americans Week.

 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 16 (UPI) -- Forty-four percent of the U.S. adult population was single in 2011, the U.S. Census Bureau said Sunday, the first day of Unmarried and Single Americans Week.

 

The idea behind setting aside the third week in September to honor singles and unmarried people began in Ohio in the 1980s, the Census Bureau said in a release on statistics based on 2011.

 

Of the unmarried U.S. adult residents, 53 percent were women and 47 percent were men, data indicated.

 

The percentage of unmarried U.S. adults who had never been married is 62 percent, while 24 percent were divorced and 14 percent were widowed, the Census Bureau said.

 

The bureau said there were 89 unmarried men for every 100 unmarried women in the United States and that 55 million households were maintained by unmarried men, about 46 percent of households nationwide.

 

In households with children, 13.6 million unmarried parents were in such living arrangements. Of this total, 10.0 million were unmarried mothers, 1.7 million were unmarried fathers and 1.9 million were unmarried couples with at least one shared child.

 

The number of people who lived alone in 2011 was 33 million, 28 percent of all households, the Census Bureau said.

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2012/09/16/Week-honors-unmarried-people/UPI-99381347806613/#ixzz26evFDAs3

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The War of the Worlds - The Original Orson Welles Broadcast Script

The War of the Worlds

 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM

ORSON WELLES AND MERCURY THEATRE ON THE AIR

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1938

8:00 TO 9:00 P.M.

 

ANNOUNCER: The Columbia Broadcasting System and its affiliated stations present Orson Welles and the Mercury Theatre on the Air in The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells.

 

(MUSIC: MERCURY THEATRE MUSICAL THEME)

 

ANNOUNCER: Ladies and gentlemen: the director of the Mercury Theatre and star of these broadcasts, Orson Welles . . .

 

ORSON WELLES: We know now that in the early years of the twentieth century this world was being watched closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own. We know now that as human beings busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinized and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacence people went to and fro over the earth about their little affairs, serene in the assurance of their dominion over this small spinning fragment of solar driftwood which by chance or design man has inherited out of the dark mystery of Time and Space. Yet across an immense ethereal gulf, minds that to our minds as ours are to the beasts in the jungle, intellects vast, cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. In the thirty-ninth year of the twentieth century came the great disillusionment.

It was near the end of October. Business was better. The war scare was over. More men were back at work. Sales were picking up. On this particular evening, October 30, the Crosley service estimated that thirty-two million people were listening in on radios.

 

ANNOUNCER: . . .for the next twenty-four hours not much change in temperature. A slight atmospheric disturbance of undetermined origin is reported over Nova Scotia, causing a low pressure area to move down rather rapidly over the northeastern states, bringing a forecast of rain, accompanied by winds of light gale force. Maximum temperature 66; minimum 48. This weather report comes to you from the Government Weather Bureau. . . . We now take you to the Meridian Room in the Hotel Park Plaza in downtown New York, where you will be entertained by the music of Ramón Raquello and his orchestra.

 

(MUSIC: SPANISH THEME SONG [A TANGO] . . . FADES)

 

ANNOUNCER THREE: Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. From the Meridian Room in the Park Plaza in New York City, we bring you the music of Ramón Raquello and his orchestra. With a touch of the Spanish. Ramón Raquello leads off with "La Cumparsita."

 

(PIECE STARTS PLAYING)

 

ANNOUNCER TWO: Ladies and gentlemen, we interrupt our program of dance music to bring you a special bulletin from the Intercontinental Radio News. At twenty minutes before eight, central time, Professor Farrell of the Mount Jennings Observatory, Chicago, Illinois, reports observing several explosions of incandescent gas, occurring at regular intervals on the planet Mars. The spectroscope indicates the gas to be hydrogen and moving towards the earth with enormous velocity. Professor Pierson of the Observatory at Princeton confirms Farrell's observation, and describes the phenomenon as (quote) like a jet of blue flame shot from a gun (unquote). We now return you to the music of Ramón Raquello, playing for you in the Meridian Room of the Park Plaza Hotel, situated in downtown New York.

 

(MUSIC PLAYS FOR A FEW MOMENTS UNTIL PIECE ENDS . . . SOUND OF APPLAUSE)

 

ANNOUNCER THREE: Now a tune that never loses favor, the ever-popular "Star Dust." Ramón Raquello and his orchestra . . .

 

(MUSIC)

 

ANNOUNCER TWO: Ladies and gentlemen, following on the news given in our bulletin a moment ago, the Government Meteorological Bureau has requested the large observatories of the country to keep an astronomical watch on any further disturbances occurring on the planet Mars. Due to the unusual nature of this occurrence, we have arranged an interview with noted astronomer. Professor Pierson, who will give us his views on the event. in a few moments we will take you to the Princeton Observatory at Princeton, New Jersey. We return you until then to the music of Ramón Raquello and his orchestra.

 

(MUSIC . . .)

 

ANNOUNCER TWO: We are now ready to take you to the Princeton Observatory at Princeton where Carl Phillips, or commentator, will interview Professor Richard Pierson, famous astronomer. We take you now to Princeton, New Jersey.

 

(ECHO CHAMBER)

 

PHILLIPS: Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. This is Carl Phillips, speaking to you from the observatory at Princeton. I am standing in a large semi-circular room, pitch black except for an oblong split in the ceiling. Through this opening I can see a sprinkling of stars that cast a kind of frosty glow over the intricate mechanism of the huge telescope. The ticking sound you hear is the vibration of the clockwork. Professor Pierson stands directly above me on a small platform, peering through a giant lens. I ask you to be patient, ladies and gentlemen, during any delay that may arise during our interview. Besides his ceaseless watch of the heavens, Professor Pierson may be interrupted by telephone or other communications. During this period he is in constant touch with the astronomical centers of the world . . . Professor, may I begin our questions?

 

PIERSON: At any time, Mr. Phillips.

 

PHILLIPS: Professor, would you please tell our radio audience exactly what you see as you observe the planet Mars through your telescope?

 

PIERSON: Nothing unusual at the moment, Mr. Phillips. A red disk swimming in a blue sea. Transverse stripes across the disk. Quite distinct now because Mars happens to be the point nearest the earth . . . in opposition, as we call it.

 

PHILLIPS: In your opinion, what do these transverse stripes signify, Professor Pierson?

 

PIERSON: Not canals, I can assure you, Mr. Phillips, although that's the popular conjecture of those who imagine Mars to be inhabited. From a scientific viewpoint the stripes are merely the result of atmospheric conditions peculiar to the planet.

 

PHILLIPS: Then you're quite convinced as a scientist that living intelligence as we know it does not exist on Mars?

 

PIERSON: I'd say the chances against it are a thousand to one. …………………..

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A Town Called Mercy

"Use it~ don't abuse it…"

 

One of the BEST episodes EVER….

 

http://www.sockshare.com/file/BD4D1499E6597798#

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Early man’s diet included cooked plants, not just meat - The Times of India

Early man’s diet included cooked plants, not just meat - The Times of India | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it

Early man is known to be a meat-eater, but a new study suggests that his menu included a range of cooked plant food, which also had medicinal and nutritional values.

 

An international team of researchers led by the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and the University of York found evidence that Neanderthals not only ate a range of roasted food, but also understood its nutritional and medicinal qualities, the 'Daily Mail' reported.

 

Until recently Neanderthals , who disappeared between 30,000 and 24,000 years ago, were thought to be predominantly meat-eaters .

 

The researchers studied material trapped in calcified dental plaque from five Neanderthals from the north Spanish site of El Sidron. "The varied use of plants we identified suggests that the Neanderthal occupants of El Sidron had a sophisticated knowledge of their natural surroundings which included the ability to select and use certain plants for their nutritional value and for self-medication," 

 

{they lived with wolves, too…hmmmm…}

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Injured bald eagle gets new 3-D printed beak

Injured bald eagle gets new 3-D printed beak | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
A team of scientists, engineers, and a dentist designed a nylon polymer beak that would perfectly replace the eagle's lost upper mandible.
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{File Under Existential Angst: the Truth is Out There, and it Sucks!} Bad Samaritan Robs Man Who Fell on Subway Tracks, Leaves Him to Get Run Over by Train

{File Under Existential Angst: the Truth is Out There, and it Sucks!} Bad Samaritan Robs Man Who Fell on Subway Tracks, Leaves Him to Get Run Over by Train | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
A surveillance camera inside the Sandsborg metro station near Stockholm, Sweden, captured footage of what initially appeared to be a man attempting to rescue a fellow subway patron who drunkenly fell off the platform onto the tracks.

 

But it quickly becomes evident that the helpful bystander is in fact a callous thief taking advantage of the situation to swipe the unconscious man's wallet.

 

Moments after the Bad Samaritan exits the scene, the train arrives and runs over the victim, who is still passed out on the tracks. 

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{File Under: Dumbfounded} Malaysian Education Ministry Releases Stereotypical Guidelines for Parents Looking to Detect 'Homosexual Symptoms' in Their Children

{File Under: Dumbfounded} Malaysian Education Ministry Releases  Stereotypical Guidelines for Parents Looking to Detect 'Homosexual Symptoms' in Their Children | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it

 

The Ministry of Education in Malaysia has upset many by officially endorsing a set of "guidelines" meant to assist parents looking to curb homosexual tendencies in their children.

 

Per the eight-point list, "symptoms of gays" include liking to wear V-necks and other tight-fitting, light-colored clothes that show off muscular bodies. Also a surefire sign of being gay according to the Education Ministry: "Attraction to men."

 

Homosexuals also likely to carry around "big handbags, similar to those used by women, when hanging out."…….

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Ancient Egyptian faience may be key to printing 3D ceramics

Ancient Egyptian faience may be key to printing 3D ceramics | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
University of West England researchers are using Egyptian faience to develop a printable ceramic that is self-glazing.
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Looking at you: Face genes identified; Five genes have been found to determine human facial shapes

Looking at you: Face genes identified; Five genes have been found to determine human facial shapes | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Five genes have been found to determine human facial shapes, researchers report.
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Second-hand smoking affects neurodevelopment in babies

Second-hand smoking affects neurodevelopment in babies | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
A new study shows that newborns that have been exposed to nicotine from both active and passive smoking mothers show poor physiological, sensory, motor and attention responses.

 

{ah, it is a tangled web we weave}

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Mytheme

In the study of mythology, a mytheme is the essential kernel of a myth—an irreducible, unchanging element,[1] a minimal unit that is always found shared with other, related mythemes and reassembled in various ways—"bundled" was Claude Lévi-Strauss's image—[2] or linked in more complicated relationships, like a molecule in a compound. For example, the myths of Adonis and Osiris share several elements, leading some scholars to conclude that they share a source, i.e., images passed down in cultures or from one to another, being ascribed new interpretations of the action depicted as well as new names in various readings of icons. Claude Lévi-Strauss, who gave the term wide circulation,[3] wrote, "If one wants to establish a parallel between structural linguistics and the structural analysis of myths, the correspondence is established, not between mytheme and word but between mytheme and phoneme."[4]

The structuralist analyzer of folk tales, Vladimir Propp, considered that the unit of analysis was the individual tale. The unitary mytheme, by contrast, is the equivalent in myth of the phonemes, morphemes and sememes into which structural linguistics divides language, the smallest possible units of meaning within a language system.

In the 1950s, Claude Lévi-Strauss first adapted this technique of language analysis to analytic myth criticism. In his work on the myth systems of primitive tribes, working from the analogy of language structure, he adopted the term mythème, with the assertion that the system of meaning within mythic utterances parallels closely that of a language system. This idea is somewhat disputed by Roman Jakobson, who takes the mytheme to be a concept or phoneme which is without significance in itself but whose significance might be shown by sociological analysis.

The term "mytheme" is analogous to, if not virtually the same in "signification" (a favorite term of Roland Barthes, another famous structuralist) as "meme", a word coined by Richard Dawkins in his book, The Selfish Gene (1976). Philosophers such as Daniel Dennett also use the term.

Lev Manovich also uses the terms seme and mytheme in his book, The Language of New Media to describe aspects of culture that computer images enter into dialog with.

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Writing On The Wall, Or Piano plague in D minor: How the Piano has been used as an Instrument in the Oppression of Women

Writing On The Wall, Or Piano plague in D minor: How the Piano has been used as an Instrument in the Oppression of Women | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Why would 19th-century doctors want to ban piano lessons for girls? Did they truly believe that learning to play music could cause sexual and neurotic disorders? Or were there sociological reasons for picking on the piano as a potential danger?

 

Michael Regnier conducts a noteworthy investigation into the relationship between music, medicine and society.

 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-piano-plague-d-minor.html#jCp

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Video: 5:22: Bald Eagle "beauty" gets a new beak and a new life: Harmed and Healed by the Hands of Humans

This short Video may reinvigorate your faith in humanity… Tearjerker Alert

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"shana tovah {u'metukah}" "a good and sweet new year."

"shana tovah {u'metukah}"  "a good and sweet new year." | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it

 

 

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, is celebrated in 2012 from sundown on Sept. 16 to nightfall on Sept. 18. The Hebrew date for Rosh Hashanah is 1 Tishrei 5773.

 

Though Rosh Hashanah literally means "head of the year," the holiday actually takes place on the first two days of the Hebrew month of Tishrei, which is the seventh month on the Hebrew calendar. This is because Rosh Hashanah, one of four new years in the Jewish year, is considered the new year of people, animals and legal contracts. In the Jewish oral tradition, Rosh Hashanah marks the completion of the creation of the world.

 

Rosh Hashanah is the beginning of the Jewish High Holy Days, or Yamim Noraim (the "Days of Awe"), and is followed 10 days later by Yom Kippur, the "day of atonement." The Mishnah refers to Rosh Hashanah as the "day of judgment," and it is believed that God opens the Book of Life on this day and begins to decide who shall live and who shall die. The days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are viewed as an opportunity for Jews to repent (teshuvah, in Hebrew) and ensure a good fate.

 

The new year is the only Jewish holiday that is observed for two days by all Jews (other holidays are observed for just one day within the Land of Israel) as it is also the only major holiday that falls on a new moon.

 

A common greeting on Rosh Hashanah is shana tovah u'metukah, Hebrew for "a good and sweet new year." Many traditional Rosh Hashanah foods -- apples and honey, raisin challah, honey cake and pomegranate -- are eaten, in part, for this reason.

 

 

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Creativity and IQ, Part I: What Is Divergent Thinking? How Is It Helped by Sleep, Humor and Alcohol?

In this two part blog post, we’ll look at the creative process and how your IQ level is critical in this process.

 

~Left brain vs right brain and creativity

 

Have you ever heard people say that they tend to be more of a right-brain or left-brain thinker? Left brain people are said to be more rational, analytic, and controlling, while right brain people are said to be more intuitive, creative, emotionally expressive and spontaneous.

 

While there is little evidence that a more dominant ‘half brain’ (left or right) determines a person’s personality as shown here, there is good evidence that regions of the right hemisphere have a key role in what is called divergent thinking and the creative problem solving that depends on it.

 

 

~What is divergent thinking?

 

Divergent thinking is the process of generating multiple related ideas for a given topic or solutions to a problem. Divergent thinking occurs in a spontaneous, free-flowing, ‘non-linear’ manner. Convergent thinking, on the other hand, is the ability to apply rules to arrive at a single ‘correct’ solution to a problem such as the answer to an IQ test problem. This process is systematic and linear.

 

The idea of divergent thinking has become important in the scientific study of creativity because many widely used tests for creativity are measures of individual differences in divergent thinking ability.

 

An example of a divergent thinking question is:

 

“How many unusual and uncommon uses can you come up with for a brick and a knife”

 

Or

 

“How many uses can you make of a toothpick?”

 

The number of different responses, or the number of responses given by no one else, has traditionally provided a measure of how creative a person is.

 

************

For a quick-and-ready demonstration of the idea of creative insight, consider this problem:

 

A MAN HAS MARRIED 20 WOMEN IN A SMALL TOWN. ALL OF THE WOMEN ARE STILL ALIVE, AND NONE OF THEM IS DIVORCED. THE MAN HAS BROKEN NO LAWS. WHO IS THE MAN?

 

If you solved the question, the solution probably came to you in a flash. The man is a priest or vicar.

 

 

 

Mark Beeman and John Kounios has identified where that flash came from. In the seconds before the insight appears, a brain area in the right temporal lobe (shown here) shows a spike in activity. This region of the ‘right brain’ in particular excels in drawing together distantly related information – exactly what is needed when working on a hard creative problem.

 

Scientists have identified some situations that help with creative problem solving – and right brain activation.

 

 

 

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Do You Remember? Were you even Born Yet? The Song That Started It All !! the sugar hill gang rapper's delight

legend !...
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{File Under: "It's Only Funny 'til Somebody Loses their Sense of Humor"} Proudly Unethical Website Hires Unemployed College Professors to Write Essays for Students

{File Under: "It's Only Funny 'til Somebody Loses their Sense of Humor"} Proudly Unethical Website Hires Unemployed College Professors to Write Essays for Students | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it

A Montreal-based website is offering college students the chance to have their essay penned by a real-life unemployed college professor in exchange for cash.

 

Not surprisingly, unemployedprofessors.com is ruffling more than few academic feathers, with many seeing its service as highly unethical.

 

But the site makes no effort to hide its less-than-educational approach to education.

 

"ISN'T IT REALLY UNETHICAL FOR YOU TO BE WRITING THESE ESSAYS FOR CASH?" ASKS ONE OF THE QUESTIONS ON THE SITE'S FAQ. "INCREDIBLY SO," THE SITE RESPONDS,

"AND BECAUSE THE ACADEMIC SYSTEM IS ALREADY SO CORRUPT, WE'RE TOTALLY COOL WITH THAT. WE EVEN ALL HAVE MATCHING TWEED T-SHIRTS.

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{File Under: More Grist For The Absurdist Mill} Ad Touting Dr Pepper as the 'Evolution of Flavor' Sparks Boycott from Creationists

{File Under: More Grist For The Absurdist Mill} Ad Touting Dr Pepper as the 'Evolution of Flavor' Sparks Boycott  from Creationists | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it

 

 "I ain't no freaking chimp," one angry soft drink imbiber wrote. "No more Dr Pepper for my household. God Bless y'all."

 

"The day your faith is shaken by a Dr. Pepper ad," read the confuters' mantra, "is the day you should probably start reconsidering your faith."

 

"Real Christians drink Go Tell It On the Mountain Dew."

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Have mathematicians finally discovered the hidden relationship between prime numbers?

Have mathematicians finally discovered the hidden relationship between prime numbers? | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Okay, math lovers, this is the one you've been waiting for: Shinichi Mochizuki of Kyoto University in Japan is claiming to have found proof (divided into four separate studies with 500+ pages) of the so-called abc conjecture, a longstanding problem...
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Dalai Lama tells his Facebook friends that religion "is no longer adequate"

Dalai Lama tells his Facebook friends that religion "is no longer adequate" | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
This past Monday, people who have the Dalai Lama as a Facebook friend found this little gem in their newsfeed.

 

"All the world's major religions, with their emphasis on love, compassion, patience, tolerance, and forgiveness can and do promote inner values. But the reality of the world today is that grounding ethics in religion is no longer adequate. This is why I am increasingly convinced that the time has come to find a way of thinking about spirituality and ethics beyond religion altogether."

 

{Sir, i agree. And ps: cooking for you was one of the highlights of my life. }

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The Ethical Dog: Scientific American

The Ethical Dog: Scientific American | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Looking for the roots of human morality in the animal kingdom?

 

Mind your manners. Animals consider their play partners’ abilities and engage in self-handicapping and role reversing to create and maintain equal footing. For instance, a coyote might not bite her play partner as hard as she can, handicapping herself to keep things fair. And a dominant pack member might perform a role reversal, rolling over on her back (a sign of submission that she would never offer during real aggression) to let her lower-status play partner take a turn at “winning”. Human children also behave this way when they play, for instance, taking turns overpowering each other in a mock wrestling match.

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Discovery of essential genes for drug-resistant bacteria reveals new, high-value drug targets

Discovery of essential genes for drug-resistant bacteria reveals new, high-value drug targets | Mind Candy  { interdimensionally } Cubed... It's SO yesterday to be a Square | Scoop.it
Biomedical scientists collaborating on translational research are reporting the discovery of a novel, and heretofore unrecognized, set of genes essential for the growth of potentially lethal, drug-resistant bacteria.
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