Science News About Social Interaction
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Video: Is Social Media Destroying Your Human Relationships? – Watch This Eye Opening Animation ‘The Innovation of Loneliness’!

Video: Is Social Media Destroying Your Human Relationships? – Watch This Eye Opening Animation ‘The Innovation of Loneliness’! | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
In a world of ultra connectedness, loneliness is one of the most common human ailments. Graphic designer Shimi Cohen illustrates the connection between social networks and being lonely.
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How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle?

How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle? | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it

Being a social butterfly just might change your brain: In people with a large network of friends and excellent social skills, certain brain regions are bigger and better connected than in people with fewer friends, a new study finds.

 

The research, presented here Tuesday (Nov. 12) at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, suggests a connection between social interactions and brain structure.

 

"We're interested in how your brain is able to allow you to navigate in complex social environments," study researcher MaryAnn Noonan, a neuroscientist at Oxford University, in England, said at a news conference. Basically, "how many friends can your brain handle?" Noonan said.

 

Scientists still don't understand how the brain manages human behavior in increasingly complex social situations, or what parts of the brain are linked to deviant social behavior associated with conditions like autism and schizophrenia.

 


Via Ashish Umre
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Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations

Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theory approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with different social network topologies revealed that collective decision making on small-world networks with high local clustering tended to achieve highest decision quality more often than on random or scale-free networks. Implications of this evolutionary theory and simulation approach for future managerial research on collective, group, and multi-level decision making are discussed.


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Tapping into the minds of your audience: The psychology of social media | Econsultancy

Tapping into the minds of your audience: The psychology of social media | Econsultancy | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Many digital marketers make a common error from the outset when planning their content marketing campaigns.
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Human-to-human brain interface - UW researcher controls colleague's movement

Human-to-human brain interface - UW researcher controls colleague's movement | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
http://www.washington.edu/news/2013/08/27/researcher-controls-colleagues-motions-in-1st-human-brain-to-brain-interface/ University of Washington researchers have performed what they believe is the ...
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No hiding place

No hiding place | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
I detect a laid-back personality IN AMERICA alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic...
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Scientific study reveals that individuals cooperate according to their emotional state and their prior experiences

Scientific study reveals that individuals cooperate according to their emotional state and their prior experiences | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
When deciding whether to cooperate with others, people do not act thinking of their own reward, as had been previously believed, but rather individuals are more influenced by their own mood at the time and by the number of individuals with whom...
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Evolution: Social exclusion leads to cooperation

Evolution: Social exclusion leads to cooperation | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Social exclusion as a punishment strategy helps explain the evolution of cooperation, according to new research.
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Brain Games that Capture Brain Circuits and What Neuroscience Tells Us about the Self

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) What is the self? Dr. Winston Chiong, Brianne Bettcher and Kate Possin explore what neuroscience tells us about this age old que...
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Why family conflict affects some children more than others

Why family conflict affects some children more than others | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
New research reveals why some children are badly affected by negative family conflicts while other children survive without significant problems.
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Exercising While Pregnant Gives Newborns a Real Head Start

Exercising While Pregnant Gives Newborns a Real Head Start | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it

Many doctors suggest that women take it easy during their pregnancies. However, being active might actually be the best thing for newborn noggins. New research shows that as little as 20 minutes of exercise, three times a week, is enough to give their babies a head start in brain development.

 

Scientists at the University of Montreal wondered if the benefits of exercise for cognition might transfer from mother to baby.

 

To study this, they asked a group of pregnant women to work out for a minimum of 20 minutes, three times per week, at a moderate intensity of 55 percent of their maximal aerobic capacity. The researchers met with the subjects monthly to ensure they adapted their intensity levels to their advancing pregnancy. The participants of a control group were asked not to exercise, and were excluded if they worked out more than the minimal amount performed by the exercise group. The control group was also monitored monthly.  

 

Ten days after each infant was born, the child’s brain activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG). Each infant’s auditory memory and ability to discriminate sounds was also measured by studying his or her brain’s electrical activity in reaction to pitches while asleep in the mother’s lap. Different brain reactions to new sounds confirmed a child’s ability to discriminate among the sounds. “We then measured auditory memory by means of the brains unconscious response to repeated and novel sounds,” Élise Labonté-LeMoyne, an exercise science graduate student, said in a prepared statement.


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Complex Human Dynamics - From Mind to Societies, by Nowak, Winkowska-Nowak, and Bree

Complex Human Dynamics - From Mind to Societies, by Nowak, Winkowska-Nowak, and Bree | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it

This book, edited and authored by a closely collaborating network of social scientists and psychologists, recasts typical research topics in these fields into the language of nonlinear, dynamic and complex systems. The aim is to provide scientists with different backgrounds - physics, applied mathematics and computer sciences - with the opportunity to apply the tools of their trade to an altogether new range of possible applications. At the same time, this book will serve as a first reference for a new generation of social scientists and psychologists wishing to familiarize themselves with the new methodology and the "thinking in complexity".


Via NESS, Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
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A Neuroscientist's Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious

A Neuroscientist's Radical Theory of How Networks Become Conscious | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it

It’s a question that’s perplexed philosophers for centuries and scientists for decades: Where does consciousness come from? We know it exists, at least in ourselves. But how it arises from chemistry and electricity in our brains is an unsolved mystery.

 

Neuroscientist Christof Koch, chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, thinks he might know the answer. According to Koch, consciousness arises within any sufficiently complex, information-processing system. All animals, from humans on down to earthworms, are conscious; even the internet could be. That’s just the way the universe works.

 

“The electric charge of an electron doesn’t arise out of more elemental properties. It simply has a charge,” says Koch. “Likewise, I argue that we live in a universe of space, time, mass, energy, and consciousness arising out of complex systems.”

 

What Koch proposes is a scientifically refined version of an ancient philosophical doctrine called panpsychism — and, coming from someone else, it might sound more like spirituality than science. But Koch has devoted the last three decades to studying the neurological basis of consciousness. His work at the Allen Institute now puts him at the forefront of the BRAIN Initiative, the massive new effort to understand how brains work, which will begin next year.

Koch’s insights have been detailed in dozens of scientific articles and a series of books, including last year’s Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist. WIRED talked to Koch about his understanding of this age-old question.


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Scientists Have Figured Out A New Way To Predict Our Decisions

Scientists Have Figured Out A New Way To Predict Our Decisions | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Researchers from CalTech and Stanford have taken a step towards using brain scans to predict the choices people will make.
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Smartphones and facial recognition: focus groups 2.0

Smartphones and facial recognition: focus groups 2.0 | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Frederic Filloux: Coupled to facial imaging, the smartphone could become the ultimate media analytics tool, for evaluating editorial content or measuring the effectiveness of ads. Obviously, there are darker sides.
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Does cooperation require both reciprocity and alike neighbors?

Does cooperation require both reciprocity and alike neighbors? | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed a new theoretical model on the evolution of cooperation. Evolution by definition is cold and merciless: it selects for success and weeds out failure.
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The more people rely on their intuitions, the more cooperative they become

The more people rely on their intuitions, the more cooperative they become | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
Researchers trying to answer an age-old question about human goodness have found evidence for a "cooperation reflex." They show that when self-interest goes up against the common good, our intuitions favor cooperation, while stopping to think leads...
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Laughter perception networks in brain different for mocking, joyful or ticklish laughter

Laughter perception networks in brain different for mocking, joyful or ticklish laughter | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
A laugh may signal mockery, humor, joy or simply be a response to tickling, but each kind of laughter conveys a wealth of auditory and social information.
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“Best Paper” award at IEEE Face & Gesture Recognition Conference | Affectiva

“Best Paper” award at IEEE Face & Gesture Recognition Conference | Affectiva | Science News About Social Interaction | Scoop.it
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