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Mind and Media
Perspectives on mind, media, and intelligence 'in the large'. Favoring the long view, items of lasting value, paradigm change.
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Does going on an information diet improve one's productivity?

Does going on an information diet improve one's productivity? | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

 

This item requires an account on the Quora site to read, and if you don't know Quora this could be a good introduction.  Apologies if you don't have one (and don't want to sign up for yet another social media site).  It's worthwhile, in my opinion, to follow the more well-thought-out questions.  Quora has some good question curators.  I suspect the idea site Quora will, as it matures, curate topical questions and answers increasingly well.

 

The saying "you are what you eat" applies to media as well as food.

 

Will an "information diet" increase your productivity?  Probably, but the bigger questions around that are, will it increase your health and humanity.

 

 

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Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university?

Do online courses spell the end for the traditional university? | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
US academics are using the web to offer world-class tuition – free – to anyone who can log on, anywhere in the world.

 

Your curator writes:

The numbers are staggering: 160,000 people taking a course on artificial intelligence that was previously offered to 400 at the university, with 40,000 completing it.

 

The article starts with the author riding in a robot-controlled car, speeding toward the edge of the roof and then .... Is that intended as a metaphor for our evolving educational system?  And if so, is it pro or con for online and mass education?

 

A long and literate article.  Even the reader comments are worth a go, and I appreciate the Guardian's monitors' curatiing them into something resembling informative public discussion.

 

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The downside of flow - Contemplative Computing

The downside of flow - Contemplative Computing | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

The book "Flow", by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, seems to be approaching classic status among the many disciplines that are seeking a better understanding of the experiential (subjective) side of human activity.  These include the designers of our digital media, who are now in the business of designing our "experiences."

 

To stereotype the "flow" mode of experience - as many appear tempted to do - to "flow is good" is a bit like saying "if it feels good, do it". This only makes sense as a corrective to an overly-controlled and analytical life habit, not as a categorical good.  Flow is as common in addictive and destructive behavioral traps, as it is in healthy and creative states of absorbed focus. 

 

Useful as it may be, this "in the moment" ethos is missing a perspective on ethics, and on long-term mental health.

 

Soojung-Kim Pang, author of the Contemplative Computing blog writes:

 

I think if anything has changed since Flow appeared in the early 1990s, it's that we've had a couple decades' experience with industries that have learned how to get us to have experiences that feel like flow, but aren't. They tap into our desire for challenging, engaging experiences, but don't deliver the moral rewards or self-improvement. The qualities that make flow powerful and redemptive can also make its manufactured versions dangerous and self-destructive.

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What is Social Media? Picture Stories

What is Social Media? Picture Stories | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Social Media explained (with coffee)....
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How to: Inquiry | YouthLearn

How to: Inquiry | YouthLearn | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

Since you are reading this blog, you are probably already "sold" on the concept of inquiry-based learning -- or interested in it, at the very least.  Far from being a completely unstructured form of education, inquiry-based learning requires that a teacher do significant advance planning in order to achieve optimal results in the classroom.  Guiding student exploration and discovery is critical to the success of inquiry learning. 

 

A post on the YouthLearn site concisely identifies some important components to inquiry-based learning, stressing the necessity of planning, as well as delving into the inquiry process in detail. It's a great article for experienced teachers as well as those new to using inquiry in the classroom.  Read it here:


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Sabbath Manifesto

Sabbath Manifesto | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

A movement based on slowing down, unplugging?  How does that make sense?

 

Suppose, for a moment, we have collectively moved from the Age of Information to the Attention Economy. 

 

You want their attention.  They want your attention.  We're all getting pretty good at capturing, compelling, directing attention.  In some circles that has moved to the top of the list for what media should do.

 

Time is limited.  Attention is limited too.  Like money, doesn't it make sense that your investments should be "liquid"?

 

Your free attention is your most valuable resource.

 

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Social Learning

People learn from each other informally all the time – Now, only more so.

 

The advent of Web 2.0 technologies and social media has led to the evolution of a variety of tools to participate in Social Learning. Social learning comes in a variety of flavors and is not limited to the course/lesson structures associated with traditional formalized learning. The infographic displays social learning types

 

 


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Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension | teaching with technology

Bloom's digital taxonomy Wheel and Knowledge Dimension | teaching with technology | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Very impressive digital animation, a must see for educators seeking to provide students with deep understanding of content and concepts.
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Changing the Nature of Knowledge

Changing the Nature of Knowledge | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

"The Nature of Knowing

One of the most important innovations that an educator can  embrace is not a software program or particular technological tool, but rather  a philosophy of teaching. In the 20th Century, the theory behind  learning and the very nature of knowledge has changed several times. Learning  theory has moved from Pavlovian and Skinnerian Behaviorism at the start of the 20th Century , to Cognitivism inspired by Bruner and Piaget in the 1960’s, to the Constructivist ideas of Vygotsky in the 1990’s and, most recently, to Social Constructivism (SC)   with theorist such as Lave and Wenger leading the way. Under the social  constructivist paradigm, social interaction is required for learning to take  place. This most recent change aligns nicely with online education because of  the advanced communication technology of the Internet and the prevalence of  online social networks and the collaborative meaning-making tools of Web 2.0.  These elements are central to both social constructivism and Web 2.0 and the  delivery of online education on the Internet and the use of these technologies  makes social constructivism a natural fit for virtual learning."

 

Dr Justin Marquis makes a case for Social Constructivism as the learning theory for today's digital age leveraging Web 2.0 social media to support the design of authentic learning experiences and collaborative meaning formation.


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Collective intelligence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Collective intelligence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

This Wikipedia article makes a valiant attempt to draw some distinctions for the term "Collective Intelligence".

 

"Not to be confused with group intelligence, collaborative intelligence, or knowledge sharing."

 

 

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The Design Economy: How to Meet the Challenges of the Next Economic Era | Economy | AlterNet

The Design Economy: How to Meet the Challenges of the Next Economic Era | Economy | AlterNet | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Joe Costello, author of the new book Of, By, For: The New Politics of Money, Debt & Democracy, has a message for America: our political economy must be democratically reformed. As we confront a moment of massive historical change, Costello explores, among other things, how electronic information technologies are transforming industrial economies. He explains how the understanding of this shaping process, or design, can help us meet the challenge of the next economic era. Hint: We're going to have to wake up to our power as citizens to get there.

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Organic Writing and Digital Media: Seeds and Organs

Organic Writing and Digital Media: Seeds and Organs | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

This article uses excellent ecological metaphors for writing:

 

"The act of writing is organic and generative. Ironically, this biological approach to writing is strengthened by digital environments that allow students and teachers to cultivate better compositions."


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What will be the next big trend on the Internet after "search" of Google and "social" of Facebook?

What will be the next big trend on the Internet after "search" of Google and "social" of Facebook? | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

Another stimulating Q&A set from Quora.

 

This item requires an account on the Quora site to read, and if you don't know Quora this could be a good introduction. Apologies if you don't have one (and don't want to sign up for yet another social media site). It's worthwhile, in my opinion, to follow the more well-thought-out questions. Quora has some good question curators. I suspect the idea site Quora will, as it matures, curate topical questions and answers increasingly well.

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A Healthy Information Diet: The Case for Conscious Consumption

A Healthy Information Diet: The Case for Conscious Consumption | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Why "information overload" is the wrong lens through which to consider the issue, or what sugar and fat have to do with Hollywood junk.

 

"You are a mashup of what you let into your life"

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The Emergence of Contemplative Neuroscience

Richard Davidson, Ph.D., persenting his talk, The Emergence of Contemplative Neuroscience, at a Meng Wu Lecture on October 2nd, 2012

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Media Psychology Research Center

Media Psychology Research Center | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Media psychology: The psychology of media, social media, transmedia and immersive technologies...
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The Paradox of Book Reading and Why Culture Is a Matter of Orientation

The Paradox of Book Reading and Why Culture Is a Matter of Orientation | Mind and Media | Scoop.it


Robin Good: The excellent and insightful Maria Popova has really got me fascinated with this piece she wrote back in June of this year. Entitled "How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read", this writing, inspired by a book by the same name, is good food for thought as it stretches ordinary assumptions about what culture and book readings is in the end all about.

 

As curation is an effort in meaning creation and discovery, exploring different ways to look at how we build our picture of reality and what role books play into this process is, from my personal viewpoint, a very valuable effort.

 

In the end, you may likely disagree with the overall logic but personally, I have found this mental stretching exercise quite valuable and I am thankful to both Maria and the author for making it possible for me to poke with it: "The paradox of reading is that the path toward ourselves passes through books, but that this must remain a passage..."

 

The challenging questions being posed is: "Must we read those from cover to cover in order to be complete, cultured individuals?" and some interesting answers come from the book author himself,  University of Paris literature professor Pierre Bayard, who offers "a compelling meditation on this taboo subject that makes a case for reading not as a categorical dichotomy but as a spectrum of engaging with literature in various ways, along different dimensions".

 

Prof Bayard writes: "As cultivated people know (and, to their misfortune, uncultivated people do not), culture is above all a matter of orientation. Being cultivated is a matter not of having read any book in particular, but of being able to find your bearings within books as a system, which requires you to know that they form a system and to be able to locate each element in relation to the others."

 

Maria Popova further synthesizes his thought by writing: "Literature becomes not a container of absolute knowledge but a compass for orienteering ourselves to and in the world and its different contexts, books become not isolated objects but a system of relational understanding...".

 

Insightful. Thoughful. 8/10

 

Full article: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/06/15/how-to-talk-about-books-you-havent-read/

 

 


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Mapping The Future Of Education Technology

Mapping The Future Of Education Technology | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

What will education look like a decade or so from now?  The demands of a changing society are predicted to alter the job landscape drastically for today's grade school students: a projected 65% of them will work in jobs that don't yet exist.  It only makes sense, then that education will have to evolve to prepare students for that future.  Check out this infographic that illustrates the move from a classroom-centered learning environment to a new set of virtual environments. 

 


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What Happened to Downtime? The Extinction of Deep Thinking & Sacred Space

What Happened to Downtime? The Extinction of Deep Thinking & Sacred Space | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
We're addicted to distraction, and it's holding us back. To find genius in the 21st century, we must build a discipline of unplugging and deep thinking.
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Story Structure Diagrams « Ingrid's Notes

Story Structure Diagrams « Ingrid's Notes | Mind and Media | Scoop.it
Yes, it's true, I've had story structure on the brain. I've also recently joined pinterest (of which I immediately became addicted). But there's a happy side effect of these two obsessions… this post!

 

Holy Cow! Here's a blog post with 10 different diagrams on story structure! I doubt you will ever need another story structure diagram after looking at these.

 

Some are similar. Some have their own unique twist. And then there's the 17 stages of Joseph Campbell's Monomyth to explore. Yikes -- that's a big one!

 

Of course, the simplest story structure is: problem -- resolution. Add to that a set-up/context in the beginning and a meaningful close at the end, and you are done.

 

Hah -- would that storytelling could be so simple! As every professional storyteller will tell you, a powerful story is all in the delivery. Still, if you don't follow the structures in these diagrams, you will simply end up with a plot-based description: "I went to the store. I bought some bread. I came home." No story there! I doubt you would pay money for that one.

 

Soooo -- check out these diagrams, use them to craft your stories, and you are half-way there. Then go work on your delivery :)

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building: Progressive Inquiry Model

Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building: Progressive Inquiry Model | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

Centre for Research on Networked Learning and Knowledge Building: Scientific background - University of Helsinki, Finland.

Networked Learning explored. New metaphors of learning: going beyond constructivism - learning as knowledge acquisition, participation, knowledge creation, progressive inquiry; knowledge building, collaborative nature of learning and cognitive growth.

A really worthwhile read!

Progressive Inquiry Model - read more here: http://www.helsinki.fi/science/networkedlearning/eng/projects.html

 


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GeekPress: Neurochemistry and Storytelling

Neurochemistry and Storytelling. "The Neurochemistry of Empathy, Storytelling, and the Dramatic Arc, Animated": Posted by Paul Hsieh at 12:01 AM · Older Post Home. Technology news, shaken not stirred...
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The New Eco-digital Commons | David Bollier

The New Eco-digital Commons | David Bollier | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

When thinking about the commons, most people make a sharp division in their minds between natural resource commons (for water, air, land, forests, wildlife, etc.) and digital commons (free software, Wikipedia, Creative Commons-licensed content, social networking, etc.) It is assumed that these two universes are entirely separate and distinct, and have little to do with each other. But in fact, these two realms are starting to blur – and we should be more mindful of this convergence and the synergies that it is producing.

The reflexive division between digital and natural resource commons is understandable. One type of commons deals with rivalrous, finite resources that can be physically depleted, while the other manages non-rivalrous resources – information, creative works, research – that can’t really be “used up” because it is virtually costless to reproduce them digitally. Most natural resources can be over-exploited if there are too many users, so the challenge is how to manage access and usage. By contrast, the biggest challenge facing digital commoners is how to curate information and community participation in intelligent, respectful ways.

But the “obvious” logic of this mental map is deceptive – because a new constellation of what I call “eco-digital commons” is using networking technologies to better manage natural resources. The digital and natural worlds are starting to “co-mingle” in very interesting and constructive ways, suggesting that the more salient differences between the two resources are perhaps less consequential than we had thought. Indeed, there are many powerful new capabilities that arise.


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Where Does The Internet Really Live?

Where Does The Internet Really Live? | Mind and Media | Scoop.it

One way to change our perception about the "weightlessness" of digital media's impact on the the environment is to learn more about its guts and bones, to see it is a part of a physical  architecture. Andrew Blum new book, "Tubes," Takes on a journey of the Internet backbone.


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Learning in a Social Organization: a clickable guide

A clickable, printable (PDF) hub to this online resource...

Via Costas Vasiliou, Larry Davies, Mário Reis
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