Mind and Body Chiropractic
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Withstanding a trigger, the fight, flight or freeze mechanism, the ...

Withstanding a trigger, the fight, flight or freeze mechanism, the ... | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Jacek Yerba . . We heal by observing the body sensations without the storyline or emotional content of PTSD, period. . Complex, abstract therapies wither under the fight, flight or freeze mechanism firing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Stress Relief: How to Handle Stress and Reduce Anxiety - Shape

Stress Relief: How to Handle Stress and Reduce Anxiety - Shape | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Between work, your to-do list, and your social life, we know that relaxing is easier said than done. Here's how to prevent stress, reduce anxiety, and be happier--all in a few minutes!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Why work really is a pain in the neck (and back) for one in four of us | Authint Mail

Why work really is a pain in the neck (and back) for one in four of us | Authint Mail | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Think your job is a pain in the neck?You  may be right. Nearly one in four of us believe remaining in the same position for long periods of our working day is responsible for our backaches, sore necks and joint pain.More than one in six told a survey...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Study Reveals the Wandering Mind Behind Insomnia - Psych Central

Study Reveals the Wandering Mind Behind Insomnia - Psych Central | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
A new brain imaging study may help explain why people with insomnia often struggle to concentrate during the day. We found that insomnia subjects did not.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health

141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
(Just Kidding, it’s 143) By Nancy Appleton PhD & G.N. Jacobs Excerpted from Suicide by Sugar Used with permission Sugar can suppress your immune system. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships i... (Crikey !
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

The Balance Solution Program

Learn how to restore the healthy balance of your youth and improve your overall health. (The Balance Solution Program: Learn how to restore the healthy balance of your youth and improve your overall health.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MAF from #HR #RRHH Making love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

Relax! You’ll Be More Productive

Relax! You’ll Be More Productive | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
THINK for a moment about your typical workday. Do you wake up tired? Check your e-mail before you get out of bed? Skip breakfast or grab something on the run that’s not particularly nutritious? Rarely get away from your desk for lunch? Run from meeting to meeting with no time in between? Find it nearly impossible to keep up with the volume of e-mail you receive? Leave work later than you’d like, and still feel compelled to check e-mail in the evenings?

More and more of us find ourselves unable to juggle overwhelming demands and maintain a seemingly unsustainable pace. Paradoxically, the best way to get more done may be to spend more time doing less. A new and growing body of multidisciplinary research shows that strategic renewal — including daytime workouts, short afternoon naps, longer sleep hours, more time away from the office and longer, more frequent vacations — boosts productivity, job performance and, of course, health.

“More, bigger, faster.” This, the ethos of the market economies since the Industrial Revolution, is grounded in a mythical and misguided assumption — that our resources are infinite.

Time is the resource on which we’ve relied to get more accomplished. When there’s more to do, we invest more hours. But time is finite, and many of us feel we’re running out, that we’re investing as many hours as we can while trying to retain some semblance of a life outside work.

Although many of us can’t increase the working hours in the day, we can measurably increase our energy. Science supplies a useful way to understand the forces at play here. Physicists understand energy as the capacity to do work. Like time, energy is finite; but unlike time, it is renewable. Taking more time off is counterintuitive for most of us. The idea is also at odds with the prevailing work ethic in most companies, where downtime is typically viewed as time wasted. More than one-third of employees, for example, eat lunch at their desks on a regular basis. More than 50 percent assume they’ll work during their vacations.

In most workplaces, rewards still accrue to those who push the hardest and most continuously over time. But that doesn’t mean they’re the most productive.

Spending more hours at work often leads to less time for sleep and insufficient sleep takes a substantial toll on performance. In a study of nearly 400 employees, published last year, researchers found that sleeping too little — defined as less than six hours each night — was one of the best predictors of on-the-job burn-out. A recent Harvard study estimated that sleep deprivation costs American companies $63.2 billion a year in lost productivity.

The Stanford researcher Cheri D. Mah found that when she got male basketball players to sleep 10 hours a night, their performances in practice dramatically improved: free-throw and three-point shooting each increased by an average of 9 percent.

Daytime naps have a similar effect on performance. When night shift air traffic controllers were given 40 minutes to nap — and slept an average of 19 minutes — they performed much better on tests that measured vigilance and reaction time.

Longer naps have an even more profound impact than shorter ones. Sara C. Mednick, a sleep researcher at the University of California, Riverside, found that a 60- to 90-minute nap improved memory test results as fully as did eight hours of sleep.

MORE vacations are similarly beneficial. In 2006, the accounting firm Ernst & Young did an internal study of its employees and found that for each additional 10 hours of vacation employees took, their year-end performance ratings from supervisors (on a scale of one to five) improved by 8 percent. Frequent vacationers were also significantly less likely to leave the firm.

As athletes understand especially well, the greater the performance demand, the greater the need for renewal. When we’re under pressure, however, most of us experience the opposite impulse: to push harder rather than rest. This may explain why a recent survey by Harris Interactive found that Americans left an average of 9.2 vacation days unused in 2012 — up from 6.2 days in 2011.

The importance of restoration is rooted in our physiology. Human beings aren’t designed to expend energy continuously. Rather, we’re meant to pulse between spending and recovering energy.

In the 1950s, the researchers William Dement and Nathaniel Kleitman discovered that we sleep in cycles of roughly 90 minutes, moving from light to deep sleep and back out again. They named this pattern the Basic-Rest Activity Cycle or BRAC. A decade later, Professor Kleitman discovered that this cycle recapitulates itself during our waking lives.

The difference is that during the day we move from a state of alertness progressively into physiological fatigue approximately every 90 minutes. Our bodies regularly tell us to take a break, but we often override these signals and instead stoke ourselves up with caffeine, sugar and our own emergency reserves — the stress hormones adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol.

Working in 90-minute intervals turns out to be a prescription for maximizing productivity. Professor K. Anders Ericsson and his colleagues at Florida State University have studied elite performers, including musicians, athletes, actors and chess players. In each of these fields, Dr. Ericsson found that the best performers typically practice in uninterrupted sessions that last no more than 90 minutes. They begin in the morning, take a break between sessions, and rarely work for more than four and a half hours in any given day.

Read More: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/relax-youll-be-more-productive.html?_r=1&


Via Ricard Lloria
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

The Secret to Digestive Wellness | PsychologyOfEating.com

The Secret to Digestive Wellness | PsychologyOfEating.com | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
The Sympathetic Nervous System – also known as “fight or flight” response and; The Parasympathetic Nervous System – also knows as “rest and digest” response. They each have a powerful and essential function, as you ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Column: Being self-aware is the key to good mental health

Column: Being self-aware is the key to good mental health | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
The last five years of my life have been transformational. And I know in my heart that none of what I have achieved would have come about if I hadn’t taken the brave step to become self-aware, writes Dil Wickremasinghe.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Ginger Tea Benefits For Weight Loss

Ginger Tea Benefits For Weight Loss | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Losing weight with ginger tea is easy because it helps us increase our metabolism, which in turn burns more fats and carbohydrates.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by MAF
Scoop.it!

Stress in the 21st Century - New You Magazine

Stress in the 21st Century - New You Magazine | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Adrenal glands mobilize the body's responses to every kind of stress—physical, emotional, and psychological—through the production and release of hormones. Cortisol, the main adrenal hormone, ... adrenals behave very differently.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MAF from Freakinthecage Webdesign Lesetips
Scoop.it!

Grab Mindsy for free today!

Grab Mindsy for free today! | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
I just got a copy of Mindsy completely free, click and grab yours too!

Via Frank Mohnhaupt
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by MAF from Stress Management
Scoop.it!

5 Foods That Cause Stress | Reboot With Joe

5 Foods That Cause Stress | Reboot With Joe | Mind and Body Chiropractic | Scoop.it
Feeling stressed? We’re all used to pinning it on our jobs, schedules or relationships. But would you have guessed that foods could be the culprits?

Via American Institute Health Care Professionals
more...
American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, August 28, 2013 2:00 PM

#causesofstress #reducestresswithahealthydiet #holisticstressprevention  Stress is a reaction we all experience on a daily basis.   There are a number of causes of stress that include our diet.    The foods we eat could be adding to our stress levels.     Combating stress could be as easy as eating a piece of fruit instead of a piece of pizza.  


Reduce stress with a healthy diet.   Eat less refined sugars and processed foods can not only make you healthier but less stressed as well.   Holistic stress prevention advice also suggests to stay away from "factory farmed" eggs and dairy.   Most of the time these food sources are heavily processed with hormones and antibiotics which is not good for stress nor your health.   In the end stick to an organic, GMO free diet and your stress will melt away as quickly as your waist line.