Milton High School Human Geography
119 views | +0 today
Follow
Milton High School Human Geography
High School Human Geography
Curated by Mindy Bilhorn
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The Individual and the Global

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has." --Maragret Mead


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:55 PM

I love the notion and sometimes agree with this idea.  But at the same time it has to be sustained by the people.  It's this exciting idea to be a part of something, but that wears off quickly for a lot of people.  Then they are on to the next thing.  It would be nice if everyone would pick one cause and stay with it for atleast a year.  Maybe make this your New Years Resolution instead of hitting the gym.  

SNMinc WebGems's curator insight, May 8, 2015 5:16 AM

The unique power of one...

Avery Liardon's curator insight, May 20, 2015 10:43 AM

Very intriguing way to summarize the world and wrap up human geography. Reminds me of the pale blue dot speech, and really captures the big idea of how people and geography shape the world we live in.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam

Quiz on the Differences Between Sunni and Shia Islam | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most of the world's major religions are made up of multiple sects or denominations, and Islam is no different. Islam's two major sects are the Sunnis and the Shiites, and the division and interplay between the two is a major factor in the geopolitics of the Middle East. How well do you understand Sunni and Shiite Islam? Take our quiz and find out!

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 2015 10:19 PM

After taking this class about Political Islam I thought I knew about Sunni and Shiite Islam.  Taking this quiz I definitely mixed up a lot of the information.  It seems like it would be simple to understand the differences and the similarities, but they are so parallel its easy to get the information mixed up.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 21, 2015 3:09 PM

"Muslim Extremists!" "Death to militant Islam!" "Muslims are terrorists!" These cries are often heard from conservative factions of the United States, who are a lot more eager to blindly hate than they are to learn about the lives of the same people they want dead. Islam encompasses some 1.3 billion believers, and there are significant deviations in both the faith and its application among such a wide population of believers. Before this exam, I knew about the Sunni majority and the Shia minority currently in conflict in the Middle East, but my understanding of the distinction between the two faiths was vague at best. I also did not recognize that each of the two main branches are then further split into different denominations, much in the same way that Christianity is today within our own country. As different and "other" we try and make the Middle East out to be, they are not that different in their religious practices (and their fanatics ruining the name of the religion for everyone else) than many conservatives would like them to be. I definitely enjoyed taking this exam, particularly within the context of everything I have been learning about with what is happening in Syria. I had no idea Assad was not just a regular Shia, but instead a member of a much smaller, stricter denomination. Learning about this region has definitely been an eye-opening experience for me, in the sense that I know a lot less about the world than I thought I knew.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:53 PM

I am not very educated on the religion but I do know from my notes in class that religion is what stops Iraq from unifying. That country is made up of three religions Muslims , Sunnis and Shiites.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, regions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.


Via Allison Anthony
more...
Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
We know where the bodies are buried ... take a virtual tour of world cemeteries that host famous artists and rogues

 

Tag: cemetery.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:22 AM

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."

 

Tags: Canada, map, North America, weather and climate.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:18 PM

It's a little strange to think that one of the world's largest countries in terms of area does not boast a very large population. Then again, when we think of Russia (the largest country by area in the world), many of its regions are uninhabited as well because of extreme climatic conditions. Countries like India, China, and Brazil, however, have enormous populations because they are located in more temperate zones, and so almost every area of the country is habitable.  There are places in every country, however, that are uninhabitable due to the terrain, the weather, or other factors. 

 

What we end up with, then, is the idea of geography as a misleading discipline. Okay, maybe the discipline itself is not misleading, but we have to be careful about making assumptions about a place based merely on its size or location. Some people may assume that some of the world's larger countries have strong and stable economies due to their size, but this is not always the case. Some of the most economically stable countries in the world are found in the relatively small nations of Europe. This map of Canada and the accompanying article, therefore, are a cautionary tale about taking things at face value and the importance of doing our own investigation and research. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:51 AM

Canada is large relatively uninhabitable country. Most of the nation is basically barren frozen wilderness. This article shows the key point that climate plays in the question of where humans decided to live. Warm and temperate climates traditionally attract the most people. Know one wants to live with polar bears. While their are many geographic factors to were people live, climate may be the most important.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:46 PM

It really isn't much of a shock that one of the world's biggest countries, Canada, does not have a large population. The obvious reason is because the temperatures reach extremely low. Not a lot of people live in Northern Quebec, Yukon, or Nunavut. Its interesting to think that a country so big has mostly all its population in cities along the border line of Canada and the U.S. One of the thoughts that comes to mind is how, Canada has all this 'empty' territory, with little to no activity happening in certain areas, is this land really Canada's to claim? We hear people always talking about the touristic areas like Niagara Falls or Toronto, but what makes places like Nuvavut, Canada? Its almost like if half of Canada is actually Canada. 

Overall, it is completely understandable that no one will want to live in extreme cold temperatures but it would be interesting to learn more about these Canadian States. 

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place

The long and ugly tradition of treating Africa as a dirty, diseased place | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
How alarmist, racist coverage of Ebola makes things worse. A dressing down of the latest #NewsweekFail.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:21 PM

Before I even read the article, my first thought went to the Linneaus classification.  That really damaged history with this one chart.  I think people still think of Africans and blacks(very dark blacks) as dirty or unintelligent.  Which is horrible and couldn't be further from the truth.  Misinforming the public is criminal.  News media and social media need to be careful and educate properly.  I've been asked from a customs offical, "Have you been to Africa in the past 6 months?"  Which is a very blanket question because Africa is a continent.  There were areas that were not hit with Ebola.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:37 PM

Those who deny the continued influence of racism in our society are blinding themselves to the truth. Contemporary influences of the racism that plagued the preceding centuries are still found in most major media depictions of Africa. The Ebola epidemic has served to highlight the bigotry that plagues Western media, as the assumption that all of Africa is diseased and dirty is continuously perpetuated (when, in reality, Ebola only affected a very small part of the continent). Africa is presented as "other," a backwards continent that is in desperate need of Western help and guidance- in what was is that different from the European colonizers who also viewed their actions as benevolent attempts to "civilize" the uncivilized? That mindset has not left Western circles, and yet we continue to pat ourselves on the back and congratulate ourselves for suddenly being so tolerant. The insensitivity of Western audiences to the concerns of black individuals both at home and in Africa related to the prevalence of racism highlights how determined mainstream media is to deny the existence of a problem. Until we recognize the Eurocentrism that continues to plague our media and make the necessary moves to correct the practice, harmful depictions of Africa will continue to loom large in Western media and in the opinions of many Europeans and Americans alike.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:12 AM

Africa has long been treated by the western media as a dark , brutish, uncivilized place. Africa is a place were people starve and murder each other in large numbers. There is so much more to Africa than the picture I just described. The problem is, many people just do not accept the existence of a culturally complex Africa. That narrative would destroy the traditional  darker narrative of the past 500 years. A narrative grounded in the beliefs that blacks are inherently inferior beings. During the Ebola crises, the calls to cut off travel to Africa were quick and demanding. Had the crises been in England, would those same calls have been so loud? I think we all can guess the answer  to that question. Much progress has been made, but we still need to change our cultural depiction of Africa.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Has All the Water Gone?

Where Has All the Water Gone? | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Once the fourth-largest lake in the world, Central Asia's shrinking Aral Sea has reached a new low, thanks to decades-old water diversions and a more recent drought." 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 13, 2015 3:52 PM

An unfortunate side affect of unregulated growth and mismanagement. This turn of events has led to many losing their livelihoods and more than likely has led to the abandoning of at least some villages/towns that may have depended on the Sea. Another great tragedy of all this is the damage to the wildlife in the region. Who knows the kinds of species that were lost. It is a sad day when a landmark disappears and for the Aral Sea it would appear it will become nothing more than a historical memory like the Rubicon. I at least hope something will be done to restore it by finding another place for the cotton production but given this is a dispute involving multiple countries it is unlikely to happen at least in the short term.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:21 AM

this is a demonstration of why you shouldn't just try to alter the environment that you are relying on for  your entire existence in a way that will have effects that you cannot possibly predict.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:22 PM

The Aral Sea, a once very large sea, is becoming a dried up sea bed. Human irrigation has played an important roll in the decline of the sea. Irrigation created canals and damns that led to the the peoples crops. Since the 1960's when irrigation was started the sea has dried up creating very large beds of salty sand. This sand was not just located around the sea but dust storms pick up the sea and deposit it on the land around the sea creating very large swaths of land that are infertile. This also creates health problems from the salt settling on the crops of the people. 

The dried up sea also creates a environmental issue of less evaporation and less rain for the crops. This also breaks down the ecological system. a area that was once booming with wildlife has been diminished to just 32 species down from the 174 it used to be. what this area needs is a enormous rainstorm or a massive ice melt that hopefully be enough to re establish the sea. This is more then likely not going to happen but its what it needs.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Start of the Year Videos

"A great Florida teacher produced this video.  Visit his course website for additional incredible resources."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:44 PM

APHG-Intro

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:31 AM

This is an excellent collection of videos to frame the study of geography.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:11 PM

course intro

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 2014 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State

Mosul Dam key win for Islamic State | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Islamic State's capture of the Mosul dam gives it control over the water and electricity supply in northern Iraq."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 2014 10:00 PM

This is interesting, ISIS is not only using brute force as a scare tactic, but are also taking hold of natural resources as well.  In taking over the dam ISIS has control of not only a majority of Iraq's water supply but their power supply as well.  They are also threatening employees with loss of pay to do what they want.  Closing off some parts of the dam is preventing water to get to people who are in need.  If the dam was to get backed up too much it could have immediate failure creating a devastating flood wiping out areas of agriculture having the potential for mass civilian casualties.  ISIS is not just taking over everything that they can, but have a method to what they are doing.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 8:14 PM

As the director of the Brookings Institution's Doha Centre in Qatar said, "There's a method in their madness. By gaining control of the area ISIS can flood and destroy homes within the region. Furthermore, they can disrupt the flow of electricity and how the land is irrigated. All of this could cause a great deal of damage to the society. In this light the dam is a pretty important part of Iraq. The fact that ISIS Manipulated he land to their benefit it highly intelligent.  


However, if the dam was in the hand of the United States, the area still isn't completely safe. people would perceive it to be because ISIS would no longer be threatening to use it as an immediate weapon. However, the author noticed that the dam needs constant maintenance and is built on unstable soil. Both of which can cause flooding. In fact, the "worst case scenario" would cause far more damage than ISIS has with the dam. 


Clearly, purposefully using the resources of an area to damage a population is more chilling the a poorly made structure because malice involved. However even in the hands of the United States, the dam shows just how dangerous manipulating nature can be on a local population. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:21 PM

This will have an enormous impact on drought for drinking, agriculture purposes or even the opposite.  This strategy could be used to flood the lands ruining agriculture.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
SRA's curator insight, April 14, 2015 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

Angela Muster's curator insight, February 21, 12:02 PM

It is important to see pictures like this one to help visualize just how much population, pollution, and consumption are effecting our world. Awareness is vital for change.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is Geography?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Flo Cuadra Scrofft's curator insight, March 21, 2015 9:38 PM

This presentation talks about the misconceptions of geography and about what it really involves. Geographers describe and try to explain how locations interact and relate to one another; are arranged the way they are; and have become what they are now. They also use critical thinking to project what the world might look like in the future. As there's usually so many questions that have to be answered, geography is an interdisciplinary work, meaning that it is a blend of natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Geographers also develop other skills, such as mapping and graphing (spatial representation skills) and development of verbal concepts, frameworks and mathematical models (spatial theorizing skills). Geography, therefore, can be used to study many issues, such as climate change, sustainability, human rights, among others.

Reflection- as the presentation accurately shows, many people believe that geography is just about memorizing countries and our world's natural resources locations, but in reality, geography goes much deeper than that. Geography is about asking questions and trying to come out with the best answers in order to solve issues that can range from local usage of land to international security.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:37 AM

Prezi created by students interested in the field of geography.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:26 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Prezi was created by students from theSyracuse Geography Department as part of a Senior Seminar to explain the disciple, the major and its utility.   This is a great recap of the discipline, the major and it's utility.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Why the Violence in Mexico is Getting Worse

"Mass killings have become increasingly common across Mexico due to the country's ongoing war on drugs. Cartels and gangs, often working with help from local police, are murdering innocent victims by the dozens and leaving them in unmarked graves. So just how bad is the violence in Mexico, and what is the Mexican President doing to stop it?"


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This video was very informative on the mass killing related to drug cartels. It clearly shows that the war on drugs comes at a high price of human lives. There is not real viable solution to stopping these drugs cartels because as seen in this video, many law enforcement agency cracked down on the head of the cartels but it backfired instead. Many factions or "little snakes" exists now because the head of it is gone. In my opinion we cannot stop drugs violence if there is no reason to make drugs in the first place (the consumers). 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 9:50 PM

It is hard for the Mexican authorities to do anything about it, they know who the drug dealers are but think about it a police chief who is honest has a life expectancy of 18 months on the force.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 5:34 PM

After watching a video like this, I have nothing to feel except sadness, all the missing people and all the dead because of drugs... What really through me for a loop was when the narrator said the police handed people over to a cartel. Who does that? Clearly it is an issue if it makes the top five for most widely reported mass killings, plus who knows however many more going unreported. It appears as something good was being done by capturing and or killing drug cartel leaders, but apparently doing good, made things worse, because without leaders, new factions were made and apparently  those new factions were much worse, being more violent and creating more incidents. Having corruption within is also probably making things much worse.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
Scoop.it!

Population, Sustainability, and Malthus: Crash Course World History 215 - YouTube

In which John Green teaches you about population. So, how many people can reasonably live on the Earth? Thomas Malthus got it totally wrong in the 19th centu...

Via Allison Anthony
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Haak's APHG
Scoop.it!

What Do You Need To Know About Central American...

What Do You Need To Know About Central American... | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
A few months ago I watched Hugo Rivera, a stocky Mexican border patrol agent as he stood on the bank of the Suchiate River in Chiapas Mexico and looked out across the border to Guatemala on the other side of the water.

Via Dean Haakenson
more...
Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:19 PM

Summary: This article discussed how although there is a net zero amount of Mexicans coming to the United States, there is still an increase migration flow from the Mexico border due to Central Americans coming to the United States through there. They come for a better life in America, with the addition of trying to escape the violence and corruption of their countries. Many of the people coming through are families, women, or unaccompanied children. 

 

Insight: This fits into the category of push pull factors, because the article shows what factors, such as violence and poverty, push people away from places like El Salvador and Honduras, and what factors, like starting over and better jobs, pull these people towards the United States. 

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Haak's APHG
Scoop.it!

Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

Via Dean Haakenson
more...
Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 2014 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production

World’s Largest Dam Removal Unleashes U.S. River After Century of Electric Production | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it
The last section of dam is being blasted from the Elwha River on Washington's Olympic Peninsula on Tuesday.

 

For almost half a century, the two dams were widely applauded for powering the growth of the peninsula and its primary industry. But the dams blocked salmon migration up the Elwha, devastating its fish and shellfish—and the livelihood of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. As the tribe slowly gained political power—it won federal recognition in 1968—it and other tribes began to protest the loss of the fishing rights promised to them by federal treaty in the mid-1800s. In 1979, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Washington tribes, including the Elwha Klallam, were entitled to half the salmon catch in the state.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2014 1:16 PM

See also this video to see the rapid changes on the nearby White Salmon River when they removed the dam. 


Tags: biogeography, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Westerners can learn from the Hajj

What Westerners can learn from the Hajj | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Though it may come as a surprise to outsiders, the journey to Mecca is a manifestation of globally moderate Islam."

 

The Mecca region of Saudi Arabia has recently been in the midst of Hajj season. The Hajj, or pilgrimage to Mecca, is strongly encouraged of all Muslims who have the means to undertake it. Importantly, by bringing together 2 million to 3 million people from across the globe, the Hajj pilgrimage is a manifestation of the diversity and moderate nature of global Islam. This image of the Muslim world as cosmopolitan and reasonable stands in stark contrast to the militant Islamist fundamentalism we more regularly hear about in media coverage — with the Islamic State and Boko Haram being the most recent manifestation of this.

 

Tags: Islam, Saudi Arabia, culture, religion, Middle East.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:22 PM

Shows the impact of the Hajj on the Muslim people as Muslims around the world travel if they are able to see this holy place. 

Molly McComb's curator insight, May 27, 2015 11:03 AM

Showing how Muslims are affected by the Hajj as they eperience the holy travel. This time of year, people from all around the world travel to see the city and take place in religious customs that have been around for centuries. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:00 PM

this is very important for people to understand, muslims are not the problem, they are not evil they are not extreme they are not terrorists. islamic groups are those things. but the fact of the matter is that the extrmeists are a problem and a ruining the perception for all muslims. the only way to fix this is for other muslims to be the ones to stop these groups, until they do so they will always be associated this way, no matter how many articles come out to the contrary and no matter how much they try to distance themselves from these groups

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Welcome To Geography!

"Lets start off the new school year in style! This is a re-imagining of an older resource designed to introduce the subject to new students in a highly visual manner.  Feel free to use & share it."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, August 24, 2014 11:59 PM

Introducción a la Geografía.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:29 PM

APHG-Intro

Sally Egan's curator insight, November 3, 2014 6:10 PM

This is a great introduction to the subject of Geography. Covering both the content, Fieldwork and investigation and teh tools and skills of the subject.

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Start of the Year Videos

"A great Florida teacher produced this video.  Visit his course website for additional incredible resources."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 17, 2014 3:44 PM

APHG-Intro

D Langen's curator insight, August 22, 2014 9:31 AM

This is an excellent collection of videos to frame the study of geography.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:11 PM

course intro

Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

Vicki S Albritton's curator insight, August 26, 8:35 PM
What we see isn't always what is.
Rescooped by Mindy Bilhorn from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | Milton High School Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2