Millennials in the age of narcissism
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Millennials in the age of narcissism
The media use of youngsters. Surviving in a 24/7 media shock and awe – distracted by everything
Curated by Jan Servaes
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Trump: The Haunting Question

Trump: The Haunting Question | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
It’s by now clear that the presidential election of 2016 is something larger than and apart from just another quadrennial contest for the highest office; it’s a national crisis. The crisis will last as long as there’s a possibility that someone totally unsuited for that office could win it.
Jan Servaes's insight:
What if the majority of Americans suffer of narcissistic personality disorder?
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A tsunami of Trumpness

A tsunami of Trumpness | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
In June 2015 Donald Trump, real estate tycoon and TV personality, announced he was running in the Republican Presidential race. At first many people dismissed him as having no chance but within weeks of nominating, his polling numbers rocketed.
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How You’re Making Facebook a Money Machine

How You’re Making Facebook a Money Machine | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
The social media addiction of customers is feeding astonishing profits.
Jan Servaes's insight:
Your addiction is making Facebook astonishingly profitable. Put a little more kindly, your emotional and intellectual interactions on the social network are creating a great place for companies to advertise.
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National Geographic Determined What Americans Will Look Like in 2050, and It's Beautiful

National Geographic Determined What Americans Will Look Like in 2050, and It's Beautiful | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
See the faces of our nation's future.
Jan Servaes's insight:
What does this mean for Millennials? As a population composed largely of over-educated 20-somethings, our generation is primed and expected to play a major role in populating this projected future America. That goes double if you live in a Western state, where people intermarry at higher rates.
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How social media is affecting teens

How are teens being affected by social media? Research suggests the impact is an emotional one.
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Nuit debout protesters occupy French cities in revolutionary call for change

Nuit debout protesters occupy French cities in revolutionary call for change | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
For more than a week, vast nocturnal gatherings have spread across France in a citizen-led movement that has rattled the government
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Cultural impact assessment: a systematic literature review of current methods and practice around the world

Cultural impact assessment: a systematic literature review of current methods and practice around the world | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
(2016). Cultural impact assessment: a systematic literature review of current methods and practice around the world. Impact Assessment and Project Appraisal: Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 1-13. doi: 10.1080/14615517.2015.1077600
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Facts Of Life: As They Move Through Life Stages, Millennials' Media Habits Are Different and Distinct

Facts Of Life: As They Move Through Life Stages, Millennials' Media Habits Are Different and Distinct | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Millennials’ don’t have a uniform media palate. Their lives are in rapid transition as they finish their educations, join the workforce, move into their own homes and start families. And how they connect and what they connect with follows suit.
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The Disturbing Flipside of the 'Digital Native' Generation

The Disturbing Flipside of the 'Digital Native' Generation | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
I can’t imagine a world in which I have as fluid a relationship to the internet as some of the people I met in West Baltimore did.
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InRealLife

InRealLife | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
InRealLife asks: What exactly is the Internet and what is it doing to our children? Taking us on a journey ranging from the bedrooms of British teenagers to the explosive world of Silicon Valley, filmmaker Beeban Kidron suggests that rather than the promise of free and open connectivity, young people are increasingly ensnared in a commercial world. And as this is explained, InRealLife asks if we can afford to stand by while our children, trapped in their 24/7 connectivity, are being outsourced to the web.
Jan Servaes's insight:
InRealLife asks if we can afford to stand by while our children, trapped in their 24/7 connectivity, are being outsourced to the web.
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Top 10 Social Networking Sites 2016

Subscribe for more Top Ten Videos Social medias has become part of our daily communication so I thought I am going to create a top 10 for 2016 video. Feel free to subscribe on my blog and share the video Top Ten Social Networking Sites 2016 Top 15 Most Popular Social Networking Sites | March 2016 - eBizMBA The Top 15 Dating Sites People Search Engines Best Web Hosting • Leading global social networks 2016 | Statistic The World`s 21 Most Important Social Media Sites and Apps in 2015 ... Social Business Technology & Data Social Networks 7 Social Media Platforms That Could Explode Before 2016 - Forbes Best Social Networking Websites | Top Ten Reviews Interesting Social Media Sites Statistics for the Top 10 Alexa - Top Sites by Category: Computers/Internet/On the Web ... Top 10 Social Networking Sites -2016 - YouTube Top 10 Social Media Networking Sites In 2016 - YouTube 7 new social media apps that could be big in 2016 - Feature - PC ... top 10 social networking sites are social networking sites good for our society top 10 social networking sites for business best social networking sites famous social networking sites top ten social media sites social networking sites good or bad largest social networks Top Ten Social Networking Sites 2016 Top 10 Social Networking Sites 2016 Top 15 Most Popular Social Networking Sites | March 2016 - eBizMBA The Top 15 Dating Sites People Search Engines Best Web Hosting The World`s 21 Most Important Social Media Sites and Apps in 2015 ... Social Business Technology & Data Social Networks 7 Social Media Platforms That Could Explode Before 2016 - Forbes • Leading global social networks 2016 | Statistic Best Social Networking Websites | Top Ten Reviews Interesting Social Media Sites Statistics for the Top 10 2016 Social Media Marketing Predictions From the Experts : Social ... Top 10 Social Media Blogs: The 2016 Winners! : Social Media ... Social Media Trends | Experian Marketing Services Social Media for Business: 2016 Marketer`s Guide top 10 social networking sites for business popular social networking sites top ten social networking sites social media sites top 10 famous social networking sites top 10 social media nederland best social networking sites social media sites to make friends Top 10 Social Networking Sites 2016 social media, how to, marketing, network, friends, business, strategy, advertising, ads, platform, analytics, services, report, software, online, revolution,top10, social networking sites, in internet, facebook, media, twitter, instagram, vine, linked in qq.com, vk, thumbler, pinterest, flicker, youtube, google
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Internet addiction exists, and this is how it affects family relationships

Internet addiction exists, and this is how it affects family relationships | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Problematic internet use is now considered to be a behavioral addiction, with characteristics that are similar to substance use disorders.
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Why the OECD Wants a Global Effort to Measure Student Learning

Why the OECD Wants a Global Effort to Measure Student Learning | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Without it, judgments about the quality of colleges will be based on "flawed" rankings, says the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's director for education and skills.
Jan Servaes's insight:

Unless we measure learning outcomes, judgements about the quality of teaching and learning at higher education institutions will continue to be made on the basis of flawed international rankings, derived not from outcomes, not even outputs – but from idiosyncratic inputs and reputation surveys

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The Many Faces of The Digital Generation

The Many Faces of The Digital Generation | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Fragmentation Of The New Digital Generation In an article published in this column last August, I raised the idea that to understand the new digital generation, you have to observe the major social transformations spurred by
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Facebook Has 50 Minutes of Your Time Each Day. It Wants More.

Facebook Has 50 Minutes of Your Time Each Day. It Wants More. | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
The average person spends more time on Facebook than any other leisure activity surveyed by the government except watching TV and movies.
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Hong Kong cost of living forces married couples into separate beds - FT.com

Hong Kong cost of living forces married couples into separate beds - FT.com | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Jim and Grace Lai, a couple in their early thirties, had the wedding of their dreams last year. But five months later they are still living apart with their respective parents. Welcome to the world of Hong Kong millennials, every bit as vexed as the
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New Study Links Heavy Use Of Social Media To Depression

New Study Links Heavy Use Of Social Media To Depression | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Do you spend so much time on updating your social media account? According to a new study, heavy use of social media can be a cause for depression.
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Youth Now Say Theyre More Likely to Use Snapchat Than Facebook or Instagram

Almost 8 in 10 Americans aged 12 and older currently use some form of social media, according to the latest annual Infinite Dial report [pdf] from Edison Research and Triton Digital. While Facebook maintains the broadest awareness among respondents (93%), awareness of Snapchat has grow
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The toxic “Age of Me” culture, Part 3

The toxic “Age of Me” culture, Part 3 | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Instead of building real value, the "Age of Me" culture is steeped in "how a person with money hires a person without for the lowest possible wage to make as much profit as possible for the one with
Jan Servaes's insight:
Business model of companies like Alibaba, Airbnb, Uber, Kickstarter, Indiegogo and elance - us creating the value and buying their services and products while leaving out that they retain all the key benefits.
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Millennials are being dot.conned by cult-like tech companies

Millennials are being dot.conned by cult-like tech companies | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Tech startups love millennials. Tasty, tasty millennials who get underpaid, overworked, churned up and turned into nourishment for venture capitalists. Millennials are the Soylent Green of the tech world.

As each batch gets mashed up, there’s a long line of new hires eager to be made into the next meal for the execs and their billionaire backers, as tech survivor Dan Lyons shows in a scathingly funny new book, “Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble individual”) describes “a kind of corporate utopia . . . where people don’t worry about work-life balance because work is their life.” No one, Lyons emphasizes, ever jokes about any of this stuff.

• Unyielding death-grip on childhood. The company’s chief technology officer announces he’s bringing a teddy bear to meetings and invites everyone else to do the same. On Halloween, everyone comes to work in a wacky costume so the company can do a group photo captioned, “We dare to be different.”

To convey the feeling that life means carrying on campus goofiness indefinitely, training sessions are held by “marketing professors” and “faculty” belong to “HubSpot Academy.” Beer taps are installed in the kitchen. The worst thing you can say is that “at my last company, we used to do it this way,” because that implies you’re a grownup with experience instead of a peppy little lamb seeing the world with fresh, dewy eyes.

After serving as technology editor for Newsweek, and with decades’ experience, Lyons finds his intern-age boss is a guy with only one previous job (an entry-level gig doing sales for Google). People constantly talk about imaginary friends such as “Mary,” a marketing person they think of as their typical customer. Mary has a detailed persona: She has an MBA from Babson; she’s 42, has two kids (10 and 6), etc. One Friday, Lyons discovers a group of employees sprawled out on the carpet making “ghastly” paintings on poster board. After a while, Lyons’ children send him off to work mornings with the words, “Have a good day at kindergarten, Daddy!”

• Chaos. The marketing department at HubSpot features so much personnel churn that it acquires the nickname “the French Revolution.” Employees disappear without warning. The human resources people have no clue how to discover talent, asking potential hires, “How weird are you, on a scale from 1 to 10?” Applicants with proven job skills get ignored because, Lyons says, they’re in their 50s and HubSpot prefers young know-nothings.

Due to what Steve Jobs called a “bozo explosion,” mediocrities hire even more mediocre people to work under them. All of these worker bees bustle around doing nonsense work such as creating would-be viral videos that vanish into the void. “Watching this video gave me cancer,” a viewer said in a comment on one such video, a parody of “What Does the Fox Say?”

A young blogger suggests guiding customers to more traffic by running ideas through a Blog Topic Generator. On the receiving end of this genius idea was a customer of HubSpot who worked for a hospital and was promoting cervical-cancer awareness. She complained that the BTG was spitting out ideas such as “Why We Love Cervical Cancer (And You Should, Too!)” and “Miley Cyrus and Cervical Cancer: 10 Things They Have in Common.” After that, notes Lyons, “The BTG is never spoken of again.”

For no apparent reason, staffers in Lyons’ department are asked to stay all night to work on ideas in a “hackathon,” as though fatigue is going to make dumb ideas any better. “Who’s in charge?” Lyons wonders. “Nobody. Everybody. One day, we are told the company will focus on big enterprise customers and that this decision has been etched in stone and will not change. Two weeks later, we’re going back to selling to small businesses.”

Yet HubSpot and many similar tech startups have certainly found a winning formula: a handful of founders and venture capitalists get rich — HubSpot, after its 2014 IPO, sports a value of $1.5 billion — without making a dime in profit.

What matters is “scale,” which you create by hiring people right out of college and making work seem fun. Give them foosball and beer, plus cultishly reinforced propaganda oozing with blather about how “you can make the world a better place” and you will secure, Lyons writes, “an endless supply of bros who will toil away in the spider-monkey room, under constant, tremendous, psychological pressure, for $35,000 a year. You can save even more money by packing these people into cavernous rooms, shoulder to shoulder, as densely as you can. You tell them you’re doing this not because you want to save on office space but because this is how their generation likes to work.”

Groovy young techies, you’ve been played. Tech startups are one gigantic millennial meat-grinder.
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Social Media Usage: 2005-2015

Social Media Usage: 2005-2015 | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Nearly two-thirds of American adults (65%) use social networking sites, up from 7% when Pew Research Center began systematically tracking social media usage in 2005. Pew Research reports have documented in great detail how the rise of social media has affected such things as work, politics and political deliberation, communications patterns around the globe, as well as the way people get and share information about health, civic life, news consumption, communities, teenage life, parenting, dating and even people’s level of stress. Social Networking Use Has Shot Up in Past Decade Year Internet Users All Adults 2005 10 7 2006 16 11 2008 34 25 2009 50 38 2010 60 46 2011 65 50 2012 67 55 2013 73 62 2014 74 62 2015 76 65 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER A special analysis of 27 national surveys of Americans across the past decade documents this substantial spread of technology throughout the population, although the overall number of users of social networking sites has leveled off since 2013.1 At the same time, there continues to be growth in social media usage among some groups that were not among the earliest adopters, including older Americans. The figures reported here are for social media usage among all adults, not just among those Americans who are internet users. In many previous Pew Research reports, the share of social media users has been reported as the proportion of internet users who had adopted such sites, rather than the full adult population, which continues to include a relatively small share (currently 15%) who still remain offline. In this report, a broader picture of the American landscape is presented, and so the figures are based on the entire adult population. Across demographic groups, a number of trends emerge in this analysis of social media usage: Age differences: Seniors make strides – Young adults (ages 18 to 29) are the most likely to use social media – fully 90% do. Still, usage among those 65 and older has more than tripled since 2010 when 11% used social media. Today, 35% of all those 65 and older report using social media, compared with just 2% in 2005. Gender differences: Women and men use social media at similar rates – Women were more likely than men to use social networking sites for a number of years, although since 2014 these differences have been modest. Today, 68% of all women use social media, compared with 62% of all men. Socio-economic differences: Those with higher education levels and household income lead the way – Over the past decade, it has consistently been the case that those in higher-income households were more likely to use social media. More than half (56%) of those living in the lowest-income households now use social media, though growth has leveled off in the past few years. Turning to educational attainment, a similar pattern is observed. Those with at least some college experience have been consistently more likely than those with a high school degree or less to use social media over the past decade. 2013 was the first year that more than half of those with a high school diploma or less used social media. Racial and ethnic similarities: There are not notable differences by racial or ethnic group: 65% of whites, 65% of Hispanics and 56% of African-Americans use social media today. Community differences: More than half of rural residents now use social media – Those who live in rural areas are less likely than those in suburban and urban communities to use social media, a pattern consistent over the past decade. Today, 58% of rural residents, 68% of suburban residents, and 64% of urban residents use social media. What follows is an overview of changes over time in social media by various demographic groups. A full archive of Pew Research Center reports on different social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn as well as about social media usage on mobile devices in general can be found at: http://www.pewinternet.org/topics/social-networking/. Social Media Usage by Age: Ubiquitous Among Youngest Adults, Notable Among Older Adults   Age is strongly correlated with social media usage: Those ages 18 to 29 have always been the most likely users of social media by a considerable margin. Today, 90% of young adults use social media, compared with 12% in 2005, a 78-percentage point increase. At the same time, there has been a 69-point bump among those ages 30-49, from 8% in 2005 to 77% today. Young Adults Still Are the Most Likely to Use Social Media Year 18-29 30-49 50-64 65 or older 2005 12 8 5 2 2006 41 6 3 0 2008 63 27 9 2 2009 72 44 22 7 2010 78 53 33 11 2011 80 60 37 13 2012 83 67 43 19 2013 88 73 52 26 2014 84 77 52 27 2015 90 77 51 35 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER While usage among young adults started to leveled off as early as 2010, since then there has been a surge in usership among those 65 and older. In 2005, 2% of seniors used social media, compared with 35% today. Social Media Usage by Gender: A Shifting Balance Over Time, With Parity Today In 2005, 8% of men and 6% of women used social media. Women and Men Use Social Networking Sites at Comparable Rates Year Female Male 2005 6 8 2006 10 13 2008 26 24 2009 40 36 2010 50 42 2011 52 48 2012 59 51 2013 65 59 2014 63 60 2015 68 62 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER Starting in 2009, women started using social media at slightly higher rates than men, although this balance has shrunk yet again in recent years. Today, 68% of women and 62% of men report social media usage, a difference that is not statistically significant. Social Media Usage by Educational Attainment: Those With Higher Education Levels More Likely to be Social Media Users Those who have attended at least some college are more likely than those with a high school diploma or less to use social media, a trend that has been consistent since 2005. In that year, 4% of those with a high school diploma or less used social media, along with 8% of those who attended some college and 12% of college graduates. Those With Lower Levels of Education Are Less Likely to Use Social Media Year College graduate or more Some college / Associate degree High school graduate or less 2005 12 8 4 2006 9 17 9 2008 29 32 20 2009 49 47 28 2010 56 55 35 2011 61 61 39 2012 65 65 44 2013 72 69 51 2014 69 71 50 2015 76 70 54 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER Currently adoption rates for social media stand at 76% for those with college or graduate degrees, 70% of those with some college education and 54% for those who have a high school diploma or less. At the same time, the share of those with a high school diploma or less who use social media has grown more than tenfold over the past decade. Social Media Usage by Household Income: Those Living in Affluent Households More Likely to Be Social Media Users There were modest differences by household income when Pew Research first began measuring social media usage in 2005: 4% of those living in households earning less than $30,000 used social media, compared with 12% of those living in household earning $75,000 or more. Those in Higher Income Households Lead the Way Year Less than $30K $30K-$49,999 $50K-$74,999 $75K+ 2005 4 8 8 12 2006 8 16 9 10 2008 24 28 27 30 2009 33 41 44 50 2010 39 49 52 58 2011 42 57 55 65 2012 50 58 59 69 2013 57 63 69 72 2014 58 64 67 74 2015 56 69 72 78 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER Those differences have persisted even as each group has seen dramatic growth in usage. Today, 78% of those living in the highest-income households use social media, compared with 56% of those in the lowest-income households – a 22-point difference. Social Media Usage by Race/Ethnicity: Consistent Similarities When it comes to race and ethnicity, trends in social media adoption are defined by similarities, not differences. Whites, African-Americans and Hispanics have broadly adopted social media at the same brisk pace. Racial Differences Not Very Evident as Social Media Usage Has Grown Year White, non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic Hispanic 2005 7 6 10 2006  9 11 2008 22 26 36 2009 39 36 37 2010 46 43 45 2011 50 48 48 2012 55 52 54 2013 61 60 65 2014 59 61 66 2015 65 56 65 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER In 2005, 6% of African-Americans, 7% of whites and 10% of Hispanics used social networking sites. Today, those figures stand at 56% of African-Americans and 65% of both whites and Hispanics. Social Media Usage by Community Type: More Than Half of Rural Residents Now Use Social Media Adults who live in rural communities have historically been the least likely to use social media. In 2005, 5% of rural residents, 7% of suburban residents and 9% of urban residents reported social media usage. Today, 58% of rural residents, 68% of suburban residents and 64% of urban residents use social media. Rural Citizens Have Consistently Lagged Behind Year Urban Suburban Rural 2005 9 7 5 2006 14 10 10 2008 28 24 18 2009 37 37 28 2010 49 47 37 2011 53 51 43 2012 58 57 48 2013 65 62 55 2014 63 64 53 2015 64 68 58 Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2005-2006, 2008-2015. No data are available for 2007. PEW RESEARCH CENTER The data reported here result from a general question about whether people use social networking sites of any kind, rather than an aggregation of individual site usage. No data is available from 2007. ↩
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Brad Szollose's curator insight, March 24, 12:53 PM
Social Media Usage Has Shot Up in the Past Decade...Thanks. Next you'll tell me Automobile Sales went through the roof from 1900-1912.
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When Did Porn Become Sex Ed?

When Did Porn Become Sex Ed? | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Conversations between adults and teenagers about what happens after “yes” remain rare.
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Team spirit

Team spirit | Millennials in the age of narcissism | Scoop.it
Businesses are embracing the idea of working in teams. Managing them is hard
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