Migration to Australia (ACHHK115)
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My Place for teachers

My Place for teachers | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it

Find rich educational material for primary and lower-secondary teachers using the My Place TV series in the classroom. Explore background information, aligned with the My Place stories, on events and people significant to Australia's history. Download clips and stills from the TV series, as well as teaching activities and student activity sheets that relate to current themes. Go behind the scenes with production information and interviews, or chat with other teachers and share stories in the teacher's forum.


Via Thomas Engesser, Sonja Shuttleworth
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Thomas Engesser's curator insight, April 8, 2013 4:20 AM

The "My Place for Teachers" website provides resources to support teachers using the “My Place” ABC TV series or the related “My Place for Kids” website for teaching and learning. Like the Nadia Wheatley book on which it is based, the TV series and the interactive student’s website explores the changing face of the people, places, objects and stories associated with one specific place in Australia. Starting in 2008, moving backward in time and featuring one story per decade, the TV series is a collection of 26 episodes, each one about a different child living in the same part of Sydney. Through changing historical contexts, each story investigates different understandings of family, community, cultural identity and heritage. For students, these historical contexts allow them to explore how different people and communities gather and combine particular artifacts, traditions, practices, knowledges, meanings and values as heritage to give a unique cultural identity to the people who live in a particular area.

 

Of particular significance here is the focus the series also has on the importance of place. Though the historical context keeps changing, the continuity and experience of place (best exemplified by the ever present fig tree), underpins and connects each story. Equally, by bookending the series with two Aboriginal stories the series explicitly recognises the continuity of Aboriginal experience and how that experience has a place. As a result, by showing how the ‘same’ place can be experienced in many different ways, My Place provides students with the opportunity to recognise how communities build a different sense of identity and heritage through the different meanings and values people attach to place.

 

As a vignette of often very different histories tied together through the continuity and experience of place, My Place allows students to connect stories to each other and investigate the similarities (including constants) and differences (including changes) that exist between them. Equally, by working in a reverse timeline and with many continuous elements (e.g. characters reappear as younger, streetscapes reappear as less developed), students are encouraged to ‘think back’ and reflect on what differences/similarities exist between them. Perhaps most significantly, this timeline format highlights how communities have and make connections to a heritage. Certainly teachers can help students to understand these connections through substantive communication in the classroom with questions such as, “What does Michaelis think of his Greek heritage when he get’s older?” or, "How does Michaelis's family and community change?"     

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Journeys: Museum Victoria

Journeys: Museum Victoria | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it
Celebrating the journeys that changed Australia forever.
Megan Taylor's insight:

These journeys were accompanied by feelings of sadness, excitement, fear and hope. They ended at a number of ports around Australia, in particular Fremantle, Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney.

 

This website and the online exhibition Station Pier: Gateway to a New Life celebrate the journeys that changed Australia forever.

Explore the journey through immigrants' stories. Discover the changing routes and travelling conditions experienced over the decades 1850s–70s, 1900s–20s, 1940s–60s and 1970s–2000s. Find out what departure and arrival meant for those seeking a home in this distant land.

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New arrivals to Australia

New arrivals to Australia | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it
What is it like for refugees arriving in Australia today? Here we find out about the experience of the Williams family,...
Megan Taylor's insight:

Well, also in the news lately we've been hearing a lot from politicians about the best way to deal with asylum seekers. But amongst all the arguing it's easy to forget that we're actually talking about real people. We caught up with a family of refugees as they arrived in Australia for the first time. And as Alfie reports, settling into a new life here can take a lot of organisation.

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Packing to Leave: Saris, Suits and Spices :+: Migration Stories from South Asia to Sydney

Packing to Leave: Saris, Suits and Spices :+: Migration Stories from South Asia to Sydney | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it
Megan Taylor's insight:

Videos and stories from 12 Migrants to Australia from South Asia originate from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. They share why they came, what they brought with them and how they feel about their life in Australia

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'Your house and mine', 1954 - asset 13 - (TLF R6585 v3.0.0)

This is a clip from a 22-minute colour documentary made in Melbourne, Victoria in 1954 titled 'Your house and mine'. In the clip, a European-accented voice-over tells of the difficulty immigrants experienced in finding houses in Melbourne following the Second World War. It shows rows of half-cylinder army-style Nissen huts and a small playground at a migrant hostel.
Megan Taylor's insight:

This shows the reality of coming to Australia.

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National Museum of Australia - What impacts has immigration had on Australia?

National Museum of Australia - What impacts has immigration had on Australia? | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it
Years 6–10Australian history, geography, environment
Megan Taylor's insight:

This is a great Teacher Reference for the topic. From the NMA.

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Chinese Australian community, 1972

Chinese Australian community, 1972 | Migration to Australia (ACHHK115) | Scoop.it
What was life like for people of Chinese origin living in Australia in 1972? This ABC Weekend Magazine program reports...
Megan Taylor's insight:

What was the White Australia policy? Based on the Immigration Restriction Act of 1901, it effectively prevented almost everyone of non-European origin from migrating to Australia. By 1972, most non-Indigenous Australians were of British or Irish heritage. Increasingly, however, people came from other European countries during the wave of post-war immigration that the Australian Government used to increase the country's population. Chinese Australians were a very small minority.

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