migration and Australian heritage
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Family - Australian Museum

Family - Australian Museum | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a complex system of family relations, where each person knows their kin and their land.

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David Cox's curator insight, April 18, 2013 12:17 AM

This resource allows student to begin to explore the family structure of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. There is an outline of the various roles played by each member of the community. The site also gives an overview of how children in the community were educated through observation and storytelling.

This resource could be used to start a class discussion on family structures and how they have changed over time, addressing CCS2.2 of the HSIE syllabus. The teacher can make reference here to British settlers and the family structures that they brought with them.

A class activity could start with a catalogue of the different family structures in the class; this activity relates to stage 2 outcomes in the Mathematics syllabus DS2.1. After analysis of the class family structures, students can discuss the differences with the family structure represented in the resource and their own family structure. Students could formulate opinions of the advantages and disadvantages of different family structures and discuss these with the class. This also addresses outcomes in the stage 2 English syllabus TS2.1.

A proposed assessment is to set students the task of interviewing an older relative, whether it be a grandparent, uncle, aunt, or parent, etc. The students would ask questions about the relative’s experiences as a child and compare them to their own experiences. Questions may be formulated by the class, first in small groups, and then as an entire class. Opportunity should also be given for students to ask ‘own choice’ questions that are independently devised. Students would then be required to report their findings to the class. Teachers can give students options as to how they would present their findings to the class. As part of this assessment, teachers should be aware of any potential sensitive family situations in the class and assess whether it is appropriate to use the activity if there is such a situation. The student centred approach in this assessment is designed to give students a sense of ownership over their assessment. Stefanou, Perencevich, DiCintio, and Turner (2004) described three supporting factors to student autonomy that when combined, enhance student engagement in classroom activities and assessment. These include: a) organisational autonomy support, b) procedural autonomy support and c) cognitive autonomy support. Addressing these supporting factors enhances students’ ownership over the structure of the interview and presentation of findings. Further, the research indicates that encouraging ‘own choice’ questions provides a more engaging experience for students.

Reference
Stefanou, C. R., Perencevich, K. C., DiCintio, M., & Turner, J. C. (2004). Supporting autonomy in the classroom: Ways teachers encourage student decision making and ownership, Educational Psychologist, 39(2), 97-110. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/hedp20

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The Rocks Dreaming

The Rocks Dreaming | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it

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combine with sydney learning adventures excursion/tour http://www.shfa.nsw.gov.au/sla

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My Place for teachers

My Place for teachers | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it

Find rich educational material for primary and lower-secondary teachers using the My Place TV series in the classroom. Explore background information, aligned with the My Place stories, on events and people significant to Australia's history. Download clips and stills from the TV series, as well as teaching activities and student activity sheets that relate to current themes. Go behind the scenes with production information and interviews, or chat with other teachers and share stories in the teacher's forum.


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Thomas Engesser's curator insight, April 8, 2013 4:20 AM

The "My Place for Teachers" website provides resources to support teachers using the “My Place” ABC TV series or the related “My Place for Kids” website for teaching and learning. Like the Nadia Wheatley book on which it is based, the TV series and the interactive student’s website explores the changing face of the people, places, objects and stories associated with one specific place in Australia. Starting in 2008, moving backward in time and featuring one story per decade, the TV series is a collection of 26 episodes, each one about a different child living in the same part of Sydney. Through changing historical contexts, each story investigates different understandings of family, community, cultural identity and heritage. For students, these historical contexts allow them to explore how different people and communities gather and combine particular artifacts, traditions, practices, knowledges, meanings and values as heritage to give a unique cultural identity to the people who live in a particular area.

 

Of particular significance here is the focus the series also has on the importance of place. Though the historical context keeps changing, the continuity and experience of place (best exemplified by the ever present fig tree), underpins and connects each story. Equally, by bookending the series with two Aboriginal stories the series explicitly recognises the continuity of Aboriginal experience and how that experience has a place. As a result, by showing how the ‘same’ place can be experienced in many different ways, My Place provides students with the opportunity to recognise how communities build a different sense of identity and heritage through the different meanings and values people attach to place.

 

As a vignette of often very different histories tied together through the continuity and experience of place, My Place allows students to connect stories to each other and investigate the similarities (including constants) and differences (including changes) that exist between them. Equally, by working in a reverse timeline and with many continuous elements (e.g. characters reappear as younger, streetscapes reappear as less developed), students are encouraged to ‘think back’ and reflect on what differences/similarities exist between them. Perhaps most significantly, this timeline format highlights how communities have and make connections to a heritage. Certainly teachers can help students to understand these connections through substantive communication in the classroom with questions such as, “What does Michaelis think of his Greek heritage when he get’s older?” or, "How does Michaelis's family and community change?"     

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Refugees and migration: Words to unite us | Global Words |

Refugees and migration: Words to unite us | Global Words | | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
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Australia's emerging communities - YouTube

Latest census data reveal the growing communities that are likely to shape Australia in the 'Asian century'. Who are our four migrant communities who are ent...

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Miriam Gergie's curator insight, April 7, 2014 5:36 AM

This short video shows the Australias emerging communities. There's a combination of people from different cultures who talk about there own cultures living in Australia. This video clip may be slightly difficult for younger stage 2 learners because it's from a short section of the news, and the language used maybe slightly difficult for their age group, however, it can be used as an excellent teacher resource. Also, Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 109) have indicated that stage 2 students need to construct new meanings of what they already know from a range of different sources. Because it is a visual resource, it may be more powerful and engaging than a written form, so students would have the ability to understand some of the features in the film. Having students watch a short film such as this would create higher order thinking and have them think beyond prior knowledge built from previous lessons. 
 

 A teaching idea, ask students to look through magazines and newspapers and cut out pictures which depict popular aspects of Australian life such as food, music, fashion, sports and art which may have originated in a culture other than their own (Rasim.No.Way, 2012). Then have students label their "cut-outs" with their culture of origin, have them make a collage of these cut-outs, then lead to a discussion by asking student's "How communities have contributed to the Australian way of life?". Students can write down their ideas on a separate piece of paper and present their idea to the class. Teachers may want to begin by writing a few ideas down on the board to give students a better understanding of the question. In addition to the discussion, have students think about different ways in which citizens in communities can value and respect each other in addition to the Syllabus Outcome CUS2.4: Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities (Board Of Studies, 2007). As McInerney & McInerney (2010) have stated that "Teachers need to build on the experiences of there students in order to advance their academic and social development" (p.329). 

In addition to this activity to sum up what they have learned, as a whole class, students can create a mind map of the different religions, celebrations and a cultural tradition for 2 or 3. For example, "Religion", students can then come up one at a time and write the different religions, they can also add a celebration of even this religion celebrates.

 

 

References:


Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational Psychology: constructing Learning. Sydney: Pearson.

Rasim. Noway. (2013). Prejudice No way: Anti-prejudice activities for years K-3. Retrieved on April 7, 2014 From

http://www.prejudicenoway.com.au/year3/2.4.html 


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History of migration to Australia | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

History of migration to Australia | NSW Migration Heritage Centre | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it

The NSW Migration Heritage Centre is a virtual immigration museum. Our website is a gateway to learn about the State’s migration heritage through community collections, family belongings, people’s memories and special places no matter where they are located in New South Wales.


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Thomas Engesser's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:57 AM

By describing and sharing memories, stories, histories as well as belongings and places regarding migration, the resources on this site offer a multitude of different perspectives on the histories and heritages of our communities. In the context of Australia’s migrant history, each story on this site provides the opportunity for students to make comparisons with and connections to their own experiences. As per the NSW Quality Teaching framework, the use of such narratives facilitates student’s connectedness to and understanding of such experiences and works to increase the significance of their learning. For example, revealing somebodies migrant heritage within the broader narrative of their personal, family and community history might help students develop the understanding that a persons migrant heritage is not only connected to their personal and family heritages but also informs the heritage of their community. Nonetheless, appropriate scaffolding might still be required to complete the learning experience, perhaps in the form of asking students to research their own history and write a personal account of their family’s migrant heritage. Alternatively, role playing a migrant story would give the student the opportunity to see the migrant experience, and the meanings and values attached to it’s heritage, from another perspective. As learning activities closely related to the context of use, they would certainly ensure an “authentic learning experience” (Lombardi, 2007).

 

Ultimately, narratives such as these oral histories gives a face and voice to historical detail/facts/figures, offering students a learning activity that has the potential to be connected to their own contexts. Here, students could recognise that a migrant history informs the heritage of all communities, including the students’ own; or, students could also recognise that each different migrant experience creates a specific cultural identity. In each case, students learn about differing viewpoints on community heritage by connecting their own cultural identity and heritage with those of others. The ability for such stories to connect to the context of student lives allows the learning experience to also connect with a student’s prior understandings, background knowledges and what is significant for them thereby making learning more meaningful and important (NSW DET, 2006).

 

Reference:

Lombardi, M. 2007. Authentic learning for the 21st century: An overview. Educause Learning Initiative Paper. Retrieved 10 April 2013 from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/eli3009.pdf.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006a). Quality teaching in NSW public schools: A classroom practice guide. Sydney: Author. Retrieved 5 May, 2012 from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/media/downloads/proflearn/secure/clasprag.pdf

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Family - Australian Museum

Family - Australian Museum | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a complex system of family relations, where each person knows their kin and their land.

Via David Cox
more...
David Cox's curator insight, April 18, 2013 12:17 AM

This resource allows student to begin to explore the family structure of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. There is an outline of the various roles played by each member of the community. The site also gives an overview of how children in the community were educated through observation and storytelling.

This resource could be used to start a class discussion on family structures and how they have changed over time, addressing CCS2.2 of the HSIE syllabus. The teacher can make reference here to British settlers and the family structures that they brought with them.

A class activity could start with a catalogue of the different family structures in the class; this activity relates to stage 2 outcomes in the Mathematics syllabus DS2.1. After analysis of the class family structures, students can discuss the differences with the family structure represented in the resource and their own family structure. Students could formulate opinions of the advantages and disadvantages of different family structures and discuss these with the class. This also addresses outcomes in the stage 2 English syllabus TS2.1.

A proposed assessment is to set students the task of interviewing an older relative, whether it be a grandparent, uncle, aunt, or parent, etc. The students would ask questions about the relative’s experiences as a child and compare them to their own experiences. Questions may be formulated by the class, first in small groups, and then as an entire class. Opportunity should also be given for students to ask ‘own choice’ questions that are independently devised. Students would then be required to report their findings to the class. Teachers can give students options as to how they would present their findings to the class. As part of this assessment, teachers should be aware of any potential sensitive family situations in the class and assess whether it is appropriate to use the activity if there is such a situation. The student centred approach in this assessment is designed to give students a sense of ownership over their assessment. Stefanou, Perencevich, DiCintio, and Turner (2004) described three supporting factors to student autonomy that when combined, enhance student engagement in classroom activities and assessment. These include: a) organisational autonomy support, b) procedural autonomy support and c) cognitive autonomy support. Addressing these supporting factors enhances students’ ownership over the structure of the interview and presentation of findings. Further, the research indicates that encouraging ‘own choice’ questions provides a more engaging experience for students.

Reference
Stefanou, C. R., Perencevich, K. C., DiCintio, M., & Turner, J. C. (2004). Supporting autonomy in the classroom: Ways teachers encourage student decision making and ownership, Educational Psychologist, 39(2), 97-110. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/hedp20

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Caring for place, caring for country

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Face the Facts - rightsED | Australian Human Rights Commission

Face the Facts - rightsED | Australian Human Rights Commission | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
The Face the Facts education resource is designed to complement the material in the Commission’s Face the Facts publication. First published in 1997, Face the Facts reflects the continued demand for accurate and easy to understand information about Indigenous peoples, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.
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Activity sheet – statistics: migration in Australia

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The Little Refugee: Anh Do

The Little Refugee: Anh Do | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
Resources to support Stage 3 Australia as a Nation HT3-3 and The Australian Colonies HT3-2, HT3-5 for the NSW History K-6 Syllabus.
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New Migrants: BTN

New Migrants: BTN | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
Well also in the news lately we've been hearing a lot from politicians about the best way to deal with asylum seekers. But amongst all the arguing it's easy to forget that we're actually talking about real people. We caught up with a family of refugees as they arrived in Australia for the first time. And as Alfie reports settling into a new life here can take a lot of organisation.
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World Vision: Get connected migration lesson plan

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Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Cultural Calendar

Multicultural and Indigenous Learning Resources, Cultural Diversity, Child Care Learning Resources, Early Learning Tools - Cultural Calendar | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it

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Miriam Gergie's curator insight, April 3, 2014 7:56 AM

This website is an excellent way to get students to gather information about significant multicultural celebrations in the local community or in other communities. Since there are a wide range of cultural celebrations that occur throughout Australia in the year, this is a great resource for students to use as it gives them an insight into the importance of celebrating such events and give students a Global Perspective within and between the communities of Australia. This website also has a range of links which students can explore and play around with. 

 

An activity that a teacher could set for students is to have them develop a multicultural calendar or Diary of Multicultural Events.

Have students organise celebrations included in the calendar, highlight the days that are celebrated by students or in the community which will give students a Global Perspective on diversity within the community. The Teacher then can have the students use different colours to highlight the events they do know about, but don't usually celebrate. Rob Gilbert (2011), believes that "studying culture and identity will involve students in a diverse range of learning experiences" (p.288). To continue from this, in small groups, you can have students discuss personal experiences they have participated in with events and share them amongst each other.

 

As an assessment, the teacher can assign each student or in small groups a world culture to research using The Global Education Website (http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/global-issues/country-profiles.html), and have students present their ideas in a poster, chart, or even a mini speech. Have students use images, words, symbols that represent these cultures. Marsh (2010) believes that "assessment can often increase the motivation of students, even though the teacher may not consciously highlight it as an incentive to work hard" (p.313). This also links in with the English syllabus outcome EN2-4A - uses an increasing range of skills, strategies and knowledge to fluently read, view and comprehend a range of texts on increasingly challenging topics in different media and technologies as students need to view, and write down these ideas (NSW Board of Studies, 2012, p.80).

 

Furthermore, to make this activity a memorable and enjoyable lesson and to further explore a Global Perspective view, have students bring in a cultural symbol, object or even clothing that reflects their culture and celebration, have students present this to the class by talking about how it's used in their culture and why it's important for them. This will give their fellow classmates an idea that everyone celebrates these special events in many different ways, and this will also give them an insight into the different cultures in their own classrooms. Having students explore a Global Perspective is important because it gives them "an opportunity to explore important themes such as change, interdependence, identity and diversity, rights and responsibilities, peace building, poverty and wealth, sustainability and global justice" (Global Education, 2011). 

 

 

References:

 

Australian Govertment - Ausaid. (2011). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Carlton South Vic 3053 Australia.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). NSW English K-10 Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum. Sydney: DET. 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming A Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. French Forest: Pearson Australia. Heritage, M. (2011). Formative Assessment: An Enabler of Learning. University Of California, Los Angeles. 

 

 

 

 

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Moving: migration memories in modern Australia | Moving | NSW Migration Heritage Centre

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Aboriginal people and cultural life | NSW Environment & Heritage

Aboriginal people and cultural life | NSW Environment & Heritage | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
Aboriginal people have attachments to the landscape stretching back many thousands of years. Find out about their ancient, living heritage.

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Thomas Engesser's curator insight, April 12, 2013 2:43 AM

This site articulates the importance the natural environment and sense of place has to conceptions of Aboriginal community heritage and cultural identity. The site provides a series of links to Aboriginal culture and heritage related publications and policies that highlight the extent to which Aboriginal community heritage, though including traditions, practices, knowledges and skills, also includes the meanings and values attached to place. This certainly challenges a Western understanding of community heritage as exclusively linked to and inherited through tangible artifacts, specifically, objects (technologically) marked or made by culture (Miller, 1987).

 

As a resource for teaching and learning in Stage 2 HSIE, most of the links in this section lead to living stories as well as recollections, memories and histories describing the cultural attachment Aboriginals have to their local landscape. Being directly sourced from Aboriginal people and or groups, each story or transcribed history clearly acknowledges the names and area of origin of those who have contributed to the material. Of particular value is a link presenting the  perspective of Aboriginal women on their own conceptions of their heritage. In six separate downloadable booklets, Aboriginal women convey their heritage by telling stories describing their connection to their local landscape and local communities. These reflections and stories, together with the site’s collection of other oral histories, can be read to and by students as a way of introducing them to the different kinds of connections that Aboriginal people have to their land and their communities.

 

However, this is not to say that other cultural groups have been excluded from developing a sense of belonging and, in turn, of community heritage through the natural environment. The site's Cultural Diversity link documents how people from different cultural backgrounds (here, Macedonian or Vietnamese) turn the natural environment into familiar places of attachment. Ultimately, by imbuing a place with cultural significance the community in turn develops and recognises the importance of this place for the heritage of the community. Here, in much the same way that Aboriginal histories allow students to investigate different perspectives on community heritage, these documents also provide students with the opportunity to understand that different cultures have differing relationships with the environment and consequently, differing heritages.

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Cultural Heritage - Australian Museum

Cultural Heritage - Australian Museum | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
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-diversity of languages, cultures and heritage across australia

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A shared history - Change and continuity - Stage 1 - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6

A shared history - Change and continuity - Stage 1 - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
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2008 Face the Facts - Chapter 2 | Australian Human Rights Commission

2008 Face the Facts - Chapter 2 | Australian Human Rights Commission | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
In 2007-08, the number of new migrants who settled permanently in Australia was 205 940.[78] The Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) defines ‘settled permanently’ as:
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Questions and answers about migrants and multiculturalism

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Muslim Journeys - Uncommon Lives

Muslim Journeys - Uncommon Lives | migration and Australian heritage | Scoop.it
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Muslim journeys

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