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Inhabitat's Week in Green: eco-friendly Christmas trees, Kingdom of Erebor ... - Engadget

Inhabitat's Week in Green: eco-friendly Christmas trees, Kingdom of Erebor ... - Engadget | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Inhabitat's Week in Green: eco-friendly Christmas trees, Kingdom of Erebor ...
Engadget
Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week's most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us -- it's the Week in Green.
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Minding Your Mitochondria: Dr. Terry Wahls at TEDxIowaCity

Editor's note: This talk is a personal narrative and is not yet backed by larger experimentation. Dr. Terry Wahls learned how to properly fuel her body. Usin...
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Sea Cucumber Found to Kill 95% of Cancer Cells, Shrink Tumors ("another power food from the sea")

Sea Cucumber Found to Kill 95% of Cancer Cells, Shrink Tumors ("another power food from the sea") | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
A compound in sea cucumber was found to kill 95% of breast cancer cells, 95% of liver cancer cells, 90% of melanoma cells, and 85-88% of lung cancer cells.

previous research on sea cucumber has demonstrated its ability to kill lung, breast, prostate, skin, colon, pancreatic, and liver cancer cells. These extracts have also proven effective in killing leukemia and gioblastoma cells. Looks like we can add yet another food to the list of anti-cancer foods.

Scientists believe a key compound known as frondoside A to be responsible. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid, diverse organic compounds found in the essential oils and oleoresins of plants.

This latest study, published in PLoS One, has confirmed just how powerful frondoside A truly is. Researchers found it to kill 95% of ER+ breast cancer cells, 95% of liver cancer cells, 90% of melanoma cells, and 85-88% of three different types of lung cancer.

“But the benefits of this compound don’t just stop at directly inducing programmed cell death (apoptosis). It also inhibits angiogenesis (the ability of tumors to grow new blood vessels to get their food) and stops cancer metastasizing by impeding cell migration and invasion. Even more intriguing is the ability of frondoside A to activate our immune system’s natural killer cells to attack cancer cells. This has been shown for breast cancer in particular but may also apply to all cancers, because it involves the immune system and not cancer cells directly. This may partially explain why frondoside A was so effective at shrinking lung tumors in mice that it rivaled chemo drugs in performance.”


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Life-cycle study shows current LED bulbs about on par with CFLs, but next-generation twice as good

Life-cycle study shows current LED bulbs about on par with CFLs, but next-generation twice as good | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
We already know that incandescent light-bulbs are on the way out because they're incredibly wasteful, being better at producing heat than light...

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BLC3's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:33 AM

The Department of Energy created this very useful and informative chart on incandescent lamps vs compact fluorescent vs LED, so that we can smply visualize the energy consumption and full life cycle cost of each of the lamps. It's public service!

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Why Choosing Pet Friendly and Eco Friendly Household Cleaning Products is so Important

Why Choosing Pet Friendly and Eco Friendly Household Cleaning Products is so Important | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Choosing eco friendly cleaning products is important for your pets, especially if they are young, old, or ill … just like us.

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Ally Greer's curator insight, September 3, 2013 1:24 PM

Did you know that animals are more susceptible to cleaning products than humans are?

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Tesla Model S Achieves Best Safety Rating of Any Car Ever Tested | Press Releases | Tesla Motors

Tesla Model S Achieves Best Safety Rating of Any Car Ever Tested | Press Releases | Tesla Motors | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
August 19, 2013 Palo Alto, CA — Independent testing by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has awarded the Tesla Model S a 5-star safety rating, not just overall, but in every subcategory without exception.
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Done and Done!

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If You Want To Earn More, Learn More

If You Want To Earn More, Learn More | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Today Ben Kench talks about learning more to enable you to earn more money for your business. The importance of increasing your knowledge base is huge and if you don't learn more your business will stagnate.
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Amazing Smog-Eating Pavement Can Reduce Air Pollution

Amazing Smog-Eating Pavement Can Reduce Air Pollution | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Now that's smart cement. Dutch scientists are heralding the results of an experimental pavement they say was able to cut air pollution by wide margins.

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BLC3's curator insight, July 11, 2013 6:07 AM

Not sure whether to include this in the Scientific & Tech Innovation or Sustainable Development but it has the best of both worlds. This cement with the Volvo wireless electric charging roads, are a dream!

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How a New Grocery Store Concept Reduces Waste and Increases Profits

How a New Grocery Store Concept Reduces Waste and Increases Profits | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

Think of your average supermarket -- it's a place of plenty, with piles of fresh vegetables bursting off the shelves, yard after yard of meats, cheeses, breads and every wholesome and unwholesome thing you could ever want to stuff in your face. But that illusion of abundance comes with an enormous cost.

 

The Natural Resources Defense Council estimates that grocery stores toss out $15 billion worth of fruits and vegetables each year, and that the average supermarket dumps $2,300 worth of out-of-date products each day. (In fact, the entire U.S. food system wastes 40 percent of the goods it produces.) Then there are the hundreds of boxes the food is shipped in; the tons of plastic bags, pasteboard and cellophane the food is wrapped in; plus the paper and plastic bags customers use to carry it home.

 

When you take a good, hard look, a grocery store starts to seem less like a modern cornucopia and more like a national shame. At least, that's what Christian and Joseph Lane see when they look at a conventional supermarket. The brothers from Austin, who run a software-consulting firm, were kicking around ideas for a second business when they were struck by the concept of a zero-waste, packaging-free grocery store.

 

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/226852#ixzz2Y5ei8bOS


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Alois Clemens's curator insight, July 5, 2013 4:12 AM

That's the spirit

 

 

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, August 25, 2013 2:26 PM

Why blame the "US food system" for the 40 some percent waste that's caused by us, not the "system?"

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Camille Seaman: Photos from a storm chaser | Video on TED.com

Photographer Camille Seaman has been chasing storms for 5 years. In this talk she shows stunning, surreal photos of the heavens in tumult.
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a new perspective on interconnectedness...

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The Big Green Business Opportunity For America’s Economy

The Big Green Business Opportunity For America’s Economy | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

As the US economy recovers from recession, America's small businesses need to remember that going green often means making green.

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Energy Efficiency Can Make Billions While Fighting Climate Change

Energy Efficiency Can Make Billions While Fighting Climate Change | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Energy efficiency could be a huge investment opportunity in the U.S., but better policies are needed to unlock financing, according to a new Ceres study.


Energy efficiency could be a several hundred billion dollar investment opportunity in the United States, but better policies are required to unlock broad-based financing from institutional investors, according to a new study by investor advocacy group Ceres.

The study details the results of a survey of nearly 30 institutional investors and other experts from the energy, policy and financial sectors that identified three areas of policy:

utility regulationdemand-generating policies and innovative financing policies


The study finds that these three areas have the potential to take energy efficiency financing to a scale sufficient enough to attract significant institutional investment.


Via Lauren Moss
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Mercor's curator insight, June 7, 2013 4:14 AM

 

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ksraju's curator insight, June 7, 2013 9:51 AM

save echo system

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Nobel Prize Winner: Your Business Should Help Others

Nobel Prize Winner: Your Business Should Help Others | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
To end world hunger, don't give away money. Just start a business, says Muhammad Yunus.
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Formula Found for Reducing Oxidative Stress?

Formula Found for Reducing Oxidative Stress? | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

What if you could turn back the clock by reducing the T-bar levels in your blood to those of a child?

Lance LeTellier's insight:

Validated by several studies published on pubmed.gov

 

Available here: www.mylifevantage.com/lletellier

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Natural Immunity: 8+ Natural Antibiotics to Replace the Drugs ("natural is better; time to switch")

Natural Immunity: 8+ Natural Antibiotics to Replace the Drugs ("natural is better; time to switch") | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Worried about getting sick? Instead of turning to antibiotics, here are 8+ foods which harness natural antibiotic properties to boost your immune system.

The overuse of antibiotics has become a modern-day epidemic. These drugs have depleted our natural immunity by killing the good bacteria in our guts and also creating super-bugs that have become resistant to almost any form of prescribed drug around. Instead of making yourself weaker, and depleting your body’s natural ability to cure itself from any number of ailments, try utilizing natural foods and herbs to ditch the Big Pharma meds for good.

1. Astragalus 

2. Onions 

3. Cabbage

4. Honey 

5. Fermented Vegetables

6. Cinnamon

7. Sage 

8. Thyme

There are other natural antibiotics out there too. They include:

Rosemary Coriander Dill, mustard seed Anise Basil Lemon balm Wild Indigo Echinacea Olive leaf Turmeric Pau D’ Arco Cayenne pepper Colloidal silver Grapefruit seed extract Garlic Ginger Oregano oil


Via Bert Guevara
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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 12, 2013 8:17 PM

My favorite is cinnamon both for culinary and health reasons. Not only does it act as a natural antibiotic, the antioxidants in it boost the immune system in numerous ways. 

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Revamped Wind Turbine Takes Design Inspiration From Dragonflies

Revamped Wind Turbine Takes Design Inspiration From Dragonflies | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

"When compared to traditional turbines, the Dragonfly Invisible Wind Turbine can withstand stronger winds, and is capable of functioning in low-intensity winds. The technique lies in the slim-line design of the turbines, which is developed to mimic the form of a dragonfly in flight and how it can glide through gale-force winds."


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Green Hornet: F/A-18 Super Hornet Fighter Plane Flies on 50/50 Biofuel Blend

Green Hornet: F/A-18 Super Hornet Fighter Plane Flies on 50/50 Biofuel Blend | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Photo: U.S. Navy, Public domain.Biofuels Probably Have a Brighter Future in Aviation than Ground TransportThe U.S. military is the #1 consumer of oil in the world, and the Navy's ships and planes use a large fraction of the total.

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BLC3's curator insight, September 11, 2013 9:51 AM

It's great to hear that the performance of biofuels is exactly the same and as such, they are not only considered but seen as a reality. We're not sure which is the plant/flower powering but it's good that it is non-competitive with agrifood farming. We hope to hear more of this - and extended to other aviation sectors, hopefully. 

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Measuring Green Efficiency State by State in US | The Energy Collective

Measuring Green Efficiency State by State in US | The Energy Collective | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

This interactive infographic compares each U.S. state on overall “greenness” and on individual categories of mass transit, renewables, recycling, water quality, air quality, and CO2.


Via Lauren Moss
Lance LeTellier's insight:

Looks like the midwest is greener than most

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Renovation, adaptive reuse stay strong, providing fertile ground for growth [2013 Giants 300 Report]

Renovation, adaptive reuse stay strong, providing fertile ground for growth [2013 Giants 300 Report] | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Increasingly, owners recognize that existing buildings represent a considerable resource in embodied energy, which can often be leveraged for lower front-end costs and a faster turnaround than new construction.
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Local Cedar Rapids Paramount Theator featured; nicely done Emily!

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Green Housing: In Buffalo, It's Not Just for Rich People Anymore

Green Housing: In Buffalo, It's Not Just for Rich People Anymore | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Can we build sustainable housing that's affordable, too? The city of Buffalo did, and created a community jobs pipeline in the process. Here's what can happen when neighborhoods take the lead.

Via Anita Woodruff
Lance LeTellier's insight:

Yes, indeed! Note they start with saving existing buildings; the most sustainable thing you can do. Add job opportunities and renewable energy and viola; this could be the best blueprint we've seen yet for neighborhood revitalization! 

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Dairy farmers move ahead on sustainability

Dairy farmers move ahead on sustainability | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Most do not report carbon emissions, water use or conditions for animals. Yet some are taking the lead, and new tools are helping.
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Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms

Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

A wave of rooftop greenhouses and vertical farms captures the imagination of architects while offering an alternative to conventional cultivation methods.


Community-gardening advocates have sold urban farming as a sustainable local alternative to industrial-scale farming and as an educational platform for healthier living. And municipalities are buying in, adopting urban ag to transform vacant lots into productive civic assets.

In the last two or three years, however, entrepreneurial urban farmers have opened a new frontier with a different look and operating model than most community gardens. Their terrain is above the ground, not in it. Working with help from engineers, architects, and city halls, they have sown rooftops and the interiors of buildings worldwide. “There’s a lot of activity right now, and there is huge potential to do more of it,” says Gregory Kiss, principal at Brooklyn-based architecture firm Kiss + Cathcart.


Visit the article link for more on recent innovations in urban agriculture and vertical farming...


Via Lauren Moss
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jean-guy Jais's curator insight, July 3, 2013 10:30 PM

very interesting

Zé Estrada Ar's comment, July 8, 2013 1:51 AM
Fortunately I live in a country filled with big farms, but it's a good iniciative.
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How much knowledge is too much?

How much knowledge is too much? | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Whether you are trying to be a successful entrepreneur, parent or friend, it’s wise to calibrate your knowledge meter. How much knowledge is too much?
Lance LeTellier's insight:

Imagination the true sign of intelligence? I like that!

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BMW i3 Electric Car Already Has 100,000 Test Drive Reservations

BMW i3 Electric Car Already Has 100,000 Test Drive Reservations | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it
Update June 15: Readers tell us that the price of the BMW i3 starts at €40,000 (~$53,000). I'm also told that the

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Electric Car's curator insight, June 15, 2013 11:56 AM

Update June 15: Readers tell us that the price of the BMW i3 starts at €40,000 (~$53,000). I’m also told that the “reservations” are actually just reservations to test drive the vehicle, which makes more sense but wasn’t clear from our source.


Original Article: Last month, we featured an infographic showing that the Tesla Model S was outselling non-electric luxury brand competitors by BMW, Mercedes, and Audi. Notably, none of these companies have an electric car on the market yet. While Mercedes is working on an electric vehicle option (the Mercedes B-Class Electric Drive), Audi has scrapped its plans for developing an electric Audi R8 e-tron. BMW will be the first to bring one to mass market, the BMW i3 (followed by the BMW i8). If BMW’s numbers are correct, it looks like the BMW i3 will come off the tracks strong. Here’s more info from EV Obsession:

 

BMW has been slow to the electric vehicle game. Or maybe it has just been timing itself carefully. The BMW i3, which I featured back in March and which is scheduled to hit European markets at the end of the year, already has over 100,000 reservations, according to BMW’s Ian Robertson.

Notably, those include reservations with and without deposits. But nonetheless…. And Robertson says a “significant number” of them have actually made deposits.

 

As I wrote back in March, the i3 is a beauty. And, clearly, coming from a trusted, high-quality brand doesn’t hurt.

 



Mario Castillon's curator insight, September 25, 2013 1:14 AM

PROTOTIPO BMW REDUCIR CONTAMINACION

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10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat

10 High-Tech, Green City Solutions for Beating the Heat | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

From a solar mansion in China to a floating farm in New York, green buildings are sprouting up in cities around the world. Among their many benefits are curbing fossil-fuel use and reducing the urban heat island effect.


The Science Barge is a floating environmental education classroom and greenhouse on the Hudson River in New York. Fueled by solar power, wind, and biofuels, the barge, which was built in 2007, has zero carbon emissions.

Vegetables are grown hydroponically in an effort to preserve natural resources and adapt to urban environments, where healthy soil, or soil at all, is hard to come by. Rainwater and treated river water are used for irrigation.

The owner of the barge—New York Sun Works—designed it as a prototype for closed-loop and self-sufficient rooftop gardens in urban areas.

 

Visit the link for more examples of green urban projects and intiatives...


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, June 2, 2013 10:39 AM

If the waters rise we could move those in places like New Orleans to floating cities?  or maybe we should move some of the policitians there and cut them loose?