midwest corridor sustainable development
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Measuring Green Efficiency State by State in US | The Energy Collective

Measuring Green Efficiency State by State in US | The Energy Collective | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

This interactive infographic compares each U.S. state on overall “greenness” and on individual categories of mass transit, renewables, recycling, water quality, air quality, and CO2.


Via Lauren Moss
Lance LeTellier's insight:

Looks like the midwest is greener than most

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America’s E-Waste Problem – Infographic

America’s E-Waste Problem – Infographic | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

'Following up on an e-Waste post from awhile back, we thought we would put together an infographic about the state of e-Waste in the U.S.  It is a challenging problem for businesses and individuals everywhere, and the issue is much bigger than you may have thought...'

 


Via Lauren Moss
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Hein Holthuizen's comment, April 20, 2013 3:24 AM
thanks for this info
Lance LeTellier's comment, April 24, 2013 3:34 PM
Also, when recycling e-Waste, make sure it is processed in US rather than shipped to third-world countries where it likely sits for years in huge piles where the exposure to the environment causes toxic runoff.
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The true cost of water

The true cost of water | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

The market’s perverse water pricing creates opportunities for businesses that look beyond the market and consider the true cost of H20.

The environmental and social costs of global business water use add up to around $1.9 trillion per year, according to new research.

Some of these external water costs already are being internalized and hitting bottom lines: Just last year, the worst drought in the United States in 50 years sent commodity prices skyrocketing. Companies, especially those in the food, beverage and apparel sectors whose margins and supply chains are tightly linked to agricultural commodities, can use the true cost of water to get ahead of the trend of external costs increasingly being internalized through regulations, pricing or shortages...


Via Lauren Moss
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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, May 18, 2013 7:06 PM

Understanding the true costs of resources, and accounting for these costs, is critical to realistically reaching the goal of Zero Footprint.