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Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming

Biber Architects’ American Pavilion at Milan Expo 2015 to Honor Food Trucks and Vertical Farming | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

The United States will celebrate one of its most prized national treasures at the next World’s Fair: the food truck. In honor of the theme of the 2015  Milano Expo—“Feed the Planet, Energy for Life”—the American Pavilion, called American Food 2.0, includes street-level food trucks that will serve up some favorite American dishes.

The pavilion’s most visually distinctive feature, is its hydroponic facade—or, a football-field-length,vertical farm that is planted with harvestable crops. “It is as though a typical horizontal field was rotated (think Inception with a farm field standing in for Paris) to become the side of a building,” said Biber Architects in a statement. “It’s not our proposal for serious urban or vertical farming, which is usually indoors, but a didactic display talking about the past, present, and future of the American farm, and the American diet.”


Via Lauren Moss
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Delphine Plasse's curator insight, May 19, 2014 5:06 AM

Marier architecture et initiatives vertes, de bonnes idées pédagogiques!

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Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms

Urban Agriculture Grows Up: Rooftop Greenhouses and Vertical Farms | midwest corridor sustainable development | Scoop.it

A wave of rooftop greenhouses and vertical farms captures the imagination of architects while offering an alternative to conventional cultivation methods.


Community-gardening advocates have sold urban farming as a sustainable local alternative to industrial-scale farming and as an educational platform for healthier living. And municipalities are buying in, adopting urban ag to transform vacant lots into productive civic assets.

In the last two or three years, however, entrepreneurial urban farmers have opened a new frontier with a different look and operating model than most community gardens. Their terrain is above the ground, not in it. Working with help from engineers, architects, and city halls, they have sown rooftops and the interiors of buildings worldwide. “There’s a lot of activity right now, and there is huge potential to do more of it,” says Gregory Kiss, principal at Brooklyn-based architecture firm Kiss + Cathcart.


Visit the article link for more on recent innovations in urban agriculture and vertical farming...


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jean-guy Jais's curator insight, July 3, 2013 10:30 PM

very interesting

Zé Estrada Ar's comment, July 8, 2013 1:51 AM
Fortunately I live in a country filled with big farms, but it's a good iniciative.