Karina's A Midsummer night's dream
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A midsummer Night's Dream
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Literary criticism

Literary criticism | Karina's A Midsummer night's dream | Scoop.it
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 This literary criticism talks about how A Midsummer Night's Dream was thought to be written to be performed at an aristocratic wedding. It explains that Theseus and Hippolyta's wedding is the reason that all attention is turned toward Athens. The fairies come to Athens to bless the celebration, and the artisans are needed to put on a performance for the wedding. The play itself suits the occasion to be preformed at a noble wedding because in the Renaissance they had elegant entertainment combining poetry, drama and music compatible with A Midsummer Night's Dream. The characters themselves are very unrealistic; Puck is a goblin and Titania and Oberon are fairies. Bottom and the other artisans are the only ones that represent ordinary people. The lovers are also fixed, although Lysander and Demetrius are under Oberon's magical herb their change is only temporary. Demetrius is left loving Helena which he was doing before the opening of the play leaving him unchanged and Lysander's change was only temporary. The moon is referred to many times throughout the play in fact 'moonlight' is mentioned three times more often in A Midsummer Night's Dream than in all of Shakespeare's other plays combined. The mortals' experience in the woods is but a figment of the imagination, perhaps that the whole play is.

 

 

Boyce, Charles. "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Critical Companion to William Shakespeare: A Literary Reference to His Life and Work, Critical Companion. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2005. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Facts On File, Inc.

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Image | Karina's A Midsummer night's dream | Scoop.it
Karina Trinque's insight:

 

This is a photo that was taken at a St. Johnshigh school during their performance of A Midsummer night's Dream. As you can see there are not many props other then the costumes of the cast. It is similar to back in Elizabethan England when there were not many props used during performing. Unlike now in those days there was not a need for scenery or props. The characters were meant to explain the scenery with language. Sometimes things such as swords, banners, rocks, beds, trees, or tables were used during a production. 

 

 

"A Midsummer Night's Dream." A Midsummer Night's Dream Play. Unknown, July-Aug. 2009. Web.25 Mar. 2013.

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Source

Source | Karina's A Midsummer night's dream | Scoop.it

Theseus in Greek Mythology

Karina Trinque's insight:

 

According to Greek Mythology Theseus' title was duke of Athens! His fathers name was Aegeus and his wife’s name was Hippolyta. Coincidence?  Shakespeare was known for not fully coming up with his own ideas when it comes to writing. He borrowed a lot of ideas from other poems to write his. Here it seems that he borrow his idea from Greek mythology about Theseus and Hippolyta. In fact Theseus from Greek mythology’s father is similar to Hermia’s father Egeus from A Midsummer Night's Dream!  Not only did Shakespeare use Greek mythology for Theseus but he also used Hermia as the feminine version of the Olympian god Hermes.

 

"Theseus." Theseus (greek Mythology). HarperCollins,23 July 2007. Web.25 Mar. 2013.

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Historical Article

Historical Article | Karina's A Midsummer night's dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Karina Trinque's insight:

 

 

This article is about the roles of women during the Elizabethan era. It states that women often preformed in pageants and spectacles and that the roles of women on the Elizabethan stage were played by boys. "It proved more rewarding to see serious female parts cast plausibly with males.” Sometimes the roles of older women were often played by mature male actors. In fact immature boys were compared to women back then. This article discusses that Elizabethans found it easy to accept the gender switch in the plays. Elizabethan women were raised to believe that they were inferior to men. They were expected to obey their father and brother or any other male in the family. If they did not obey them they would be beaten. “Women in her greatest perfection were made to serve and obey men.” Men made all of the decisions for women in this era without consulting with them at all. There were many restrictions for Elizabethan woman. Only wealthy or noble women were allowed the privilege of education.

 

 

"Women's Roles in Elizabethan Era." Ebscohost.com. Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd / Books, Nov. 2004. Web. 24 Mar. 2013.

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Video:PUCK in New York - Shakespeare Midsummer nights dream parody

Karina Trinque's insight:

This is a video about Puck from A Midsummer Night’s Dream; a man breaks into his apartment in the Bronx of New York and attempts to steal his flat screen television. Then puck catches him and the man apologizes because it was his first break in and he is really not a criminal in fact he is a writer and he’s just trying to break his writers block by doing something crazy. The writer then catches a glimpse of Pucks horns and finds out that Puck is a mythical creature and is shocked. When asked what has happen Puck explains that he was not always miserable, he once help Oberon marry Titania and they were king and queen of the fairies. But then Titania blamed him when their marriage broke up. So she cursed him and took his magical flute and still has it to this day. Puck says she is now a rich divorce lawyer in Tribeca. The writer then promises to get Pucks flute back, they then go on a funny adventure type journey through New York to get Pucks flute from Titania. In the end the goddess Athena saves the day and Puck get his flute back. (0:00-3:30)

 

 

 

 

"PUCK in New York - Shakespeare Midsummer Nights Dream Parody." YouTube. YouTube, 30 Apr. 2012. Web. 25 Mar. 2013.

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