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Rescooped by Debra Evans from Modern Library & Learning Environments
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Study Shows How Classroom Design Affects Student Learning

Study Shows How Classroom Design Affects Student Learning | Middle years | Scoop.it
A new study shows how color, lighting, and other classroom design choices can have a huge impact on student progress.

Via L2_S2S
Debra Evans's insight:

For consideration! 

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L2_S2S's curator insight, September 15, 2014 7:37 PM

Of course it goes without saying that good library design impacts and affects student learning too.

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The Challenges and Realities of Inquiry-Based Learning

The Challenges and Realities of Inquiry-Based Learning | Middle years | Scoop.it
As education continues the march toward a student-driven, project-oriented approach that values intelligent solutions to open-ended problems, it won’t be sufficient to focus on the wonderful discoveries and authentic work that result from an...

Via Nik Peachey, Debra Evans
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Debra Evans's curator insight, July 11, 2013 5:52 PM

An excellent account of Inquiry. Thought provoking and presents a clear case.

bookjewel's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:54 PM

Excellent insights

 

Debra Evans's curator insight, October 2, 2013 6:11 PM

This is essential reading if you are serious about inquiry based Learning.

Rescooped by Debra Evans from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Teachers, parents say students thrive in 'flipped learning' classrooms

Teachers, parents say students thrive in 'flipped learning' classrooms | Middle years | Scoop.it
There's a quiet revolution happening in some local classrooms. It's called 'Flipped Learning,' and teachers, students and parents are raving about it. - Local at MyNorthwest.com

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Debra Evans's insight:

Must read 

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Stephanie Haumont's curator insight, September 15, 2013 11:01 PM

Successes!

Meleny Weber's comment, October 14, 2013 4:35 PM
I like seeing the parent's response to Flipped Classrooms. You normally only hear of a teacher's view or the students' view on the new method. Parents should be very involved in their kid's learning, so their opinion does in fact matter.
Meleny Weber's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:35 PM
This article shows a unique method in a flipped classroom. Instead of the students going home to listen to a recorded lecture, they hear it in class. This article talks about a specific teacher, Mr. Brown, who divides his class of 24 into three groups. One group listens to the pre-recorded lesson, while another meets with Mr. Brown and learns the same lesson, while the third group of students meets together for group-work sometimes with the assistance of a parent volunteer. This method sounds awesome! The students get twice as much instruction, and also get more one-on-one assistance from the teacher. They also receive immediate feedback from Mr. Brown, the parent volunteer, and their fellow students. The article then goes on and quotes some of the students in the class. In an interview with one student, Emma, she says that she is very shy and tends to not ask questions. Now, in a flipped classroom she has the opportunity to re-watch the lesson and answer the question herself, also making her a stronger student in the long-term. The author of the article also interviewed the mother of twins in the flipped classroom. She absolutely loves this new method because when her kids miss class they can catch up with schoolwork and keep up with the lesson plans simply by logging online. Flipped classrooms help get parents more involved with their students learning. I know when I was in school and I did not understand a math technique, I would always ask my Dad for help. He went to school a long time before I did, and therefore knows different techniques then we were taught. With flipped classrooms, the parents can watch the video, and help teach their children the teacher’s method. More interviews with students show that they really enjoy the new method of a flipped classroom. They finish most of their work in the classroom, because they do not have to wait for other children to understand, and therefore have more free time to participate in extracurricular activities. I really enjoyed this article because it showed a different side to flipped classrooms. This is the only information I found that included the parents view on the situation. The parents in this article put it in a positive light. They did not ask very many parents, so this could be biased article, but after all of my other research and curating, I have to agree that flipped classrooms and blended learning is the future. I think it really helps a lot of students, and makes the classroom a more equal and exciting place to learn! I am definitely thinking about working in a school that practices flipped classrooms because I truly think it is the best option for many students across the nation.
Rescooped by Debra Evans from GEP Designing curriculum
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Teaching for Understanding

Teaching for Understanding | Middle years | Scoop.it

The Teaching for Understanding project was a five-year research program designed to develop and test a pedagogy of understanding. The project targeted the middle and high school years and focused on teaching
and learning in four subjects (English, history, math, and science) and interdisciplinary studies. Since the project's inception, researchers and practitioners have collaborated to develop, refine, and test the pedagogy.

 


Via Global Education Project, Victoria
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Rescooped by Debra Evans from Learning Technology News
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The Challenges and Realities of Inquiry-Based Learning

The Challenges and Realities of Inquiry-Based Learning | Middle years | Scoop.it
As education continues the march toward a student-driven, project-oriented approach that values intelligent solutions to open-ended problems, it won’t be sufficient to focus on the wonderful discoveries and authentic work that result from an...

Via Nik Peachey
Debra Evans's insight:

This is essential reading if you are serious about inquiry based Learning.

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Drora Arussy's comment, July 11, 2013 12:40 AM
I find that by not evaluating in the formal sense, but by allowing students the room for self expression and motivation, as you say, the assessment takes care of itself. I use a rubric to see that they are incorporating the skills as needed (of course they see the rubric beforehand) and creativity and ingenuity definitely come into play. You are spot on with the teacher as facilitator, it is the most rewarding role if you ask me.
Debra Evans's curator insight, July 11, 2013 5:52 PM

An excellent account of Inquiry. Thought provoking and presents a clear case.

bookjewel's curator insight, July 16, 2013 5:54 PM

Excellent insights

 

Rescooped by Debra Evans from Eclectic Technology
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The PBL Super Highway... Over 45 Links To Great Project Based Learning

The PBL Super Highway... Over 45 Links To Great Project Based Learning | Middle years | Scoop.it

"Are you on a journey to find  great PBL ideas? Then you have come to the right place. In fact, you just might want to spend some time here and also continue to come back. The first of my list includes sites that have created data bases of PBL Units. You will find units that you can use, improve, or incorporate as a base."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, September 16, 2013 7:56 PM

If you are going to be using Project Based Learning (PBL) in your classroom this year then take the time to check out this post. You will find 45 resources to help you along the way. Sections include:

* Databases of PBL Units

* Other PBL Idea Generators

* Challenges and Competitions

Each site is hot linked and there is a short description of what you will find if you click through. This post has put together an amazing number of PBL resources that will provide great resources to help make PBL successful in your classroom!

Lauren Yachera's curator insight, February 19, 2014 2:48 PM

Useful links when it comes to coming up with a great PBL for the classroom. This website will be incredibly useful in the future!

Danielle Howard's comment, February 20, 2014 7:25 PM
Website that offers links to find PBL ideas. This will be great resource to use when struggling to come up with a project for students' interests.
Rescooped by Debra Evans from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Globally Connected Educator

Globally Connected Educator | Middle years | Scoop.it
As part of Curriculum21 Social Learning Institute and in collaboration with Eduplanet21, I have authored a Learning Path for the Globally Connected Educator. Take a look at the modules offered. If ...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Debra Evans's insight:

Worth a look for sure

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The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom

The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom | Middle years | Scoop.it

Teaching students the mechanism behind how the brain operates and teaching them approaches they can use to work that mechanism more effectively helps students believe they can create a more intelligent, creative, and powerful brain. It also shows them that striving for emotional awareness and physical health is part of keeping an optimally functioning brain.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 30, 2013 3:30 AM

This article has some interesting suggestions for encouraging students to understand how their brain works and how they can make studying more effective.

 

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The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom

The Simple Things I Do To Promote Brain-Based Learning In My Classroom | Middle years | Scoop.it

Teaching students the mechanism behind how the brain operates and teaching them approaches they can use to work that mechanism more effectively helps students believe they can create a more intelligent, creative, and powerful brain. It also shows them that striving for emotional awareness and physical health is part of keeping an optimally functioning brain.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 30, 2013 3:30 AM

This article has some interesting suggestions for encouraging students to understand how their brain works and how they can make studying more effective.

 

Rescooped by Debra Evans from E-Learning and Online Teaching
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Online Course: Project-based Learning in the Flipped Classroom

Online Course: Project-based Learning in the Flipped Classroom | Middle years | Scoop.it

Explore instructional strategies for implementing the flipped classroom approach to support a learner-centered, project-based approach to learning to liberate your face-to-face time in the classroom. Implications for classroom management, effective assessment, problem-solving and collaboration to improve student motivation and engagement in the classroom. Put the flipped model into context with brain-based learning research.

 

This course is an approved elective in the Master of Science in Education online degree program. NOTE: You may enroll in this course to meet your goals for professional development, license renewal, or to complete graduate credits and transfer the credit to another university.


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Patti Griffiths Bryant's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:34 PM

Flipping - flipping - flipping.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 16, 2014 9:55 PM

Kay Lehmann's online classes are always superb.


Don't miss this one! .  

Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, August 21, 2014 1:30 AM

If you want online training for a flipped classroom here is a link.

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Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning

Stop Telling Your Students To "Pay attention!" | Brain Based Learning | Brain Based Teaching | Articles From Jensen Learning | Middle years | Scoop.it

What happens when you tell your students to "pay attention!" More than you may think. This post explores what goes on in the brain and ways the brain pays attention. Research is shared as well as what you can do in your classroom immediately as well what you can do in the long term.
Short term solutions include "using prediction; using the brief pause and chunk technique; priming the learning with small hints, appetizers and teasers" and more.

You may also choose to view a video of a session "Teaching with the Brain in Mind" at http://www.scilearn.com/company/webinars/ (you will need to scroll down the page to find the link).


Via Beth Dichter
Debra Evans's insight:

Useful

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Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 10:37 AM

"Instead of saying to students, “Pay attention!” what you really want to say is, “Suppress interesting things!” Why? Students already DO pay attention."  The point being, prolonged attention paying is a learned skill, practiced.  Intersperse teaching with stand-up breaks, quick physical activity.  Create "hooks' for attention - previews - and offer rewards - like homework free pass this month - for students who get it right; helps them be invested in topic