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Middle  School  English and Reading
Creating a love to read, write, speak, listen, view, and above all--think
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Thinking Critically - A Student Toolkit

Thinking Critically - A Student Toolkit | Middle  School  English and Reading | Scoop.it

"Understand what critical thinking means and how critical thinkers think. Learn to express yourself clearly and develop a balanced argument."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 7, 2014 7:55 PM

This site provides a range of materials to help students learn critical thinking skills. The resources include:

* A video that helps guide you on ways to improve your critical thinking skills.

* An infographic (see image above) that helps you visualize the questions to consider asking.

* Top Tips for Critical Thinking - Five tips are provided with additional information under each. 

* An Apply Section which has three questions that students may answer.

* Enhance Your Wellness - learn a few tips that will help your mental and physical health that may allow you to improve your focus and your grades.

There is a lot of excellent information in this post. Although it is geared to college students much of this may be used in upper elementary, middle and high school.

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Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts | Visual.ly

Copyright Infringement: 5 Myths vs Facts | Visual.ly | Middle  School  English and Reading | Scoop.it
We're in the middle of a Copyright Infringement epidemic happening on the Internet right now. Copyright is misunderstood and as a result webmasters an

Via Beth Dichter
Jennifer Hurley-Coughlin's insight:

good to use with research intro

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 1, 2013 8:53 PM

Check out this infographic to learn five myths and five facts about copyright. Consider mixing them up and asking your students to try to determine truth from fiction. And ask your students to review it before they begin to do research online.

Kimberly House's curator insight, October 3, 2013 2:01 PM

A good info graphic to remind both students and teachers. It's a good starting point.

 

Adrian Satterfield's curator insight, August 16, 2015 2:41 PM

I always try to stay away from using other peoples work , but going into the industry an having the internet incorporated in almost every aspect of this career field makes even harder to protect my own work. I might stray away from using copyrighted work but there are people out there that don't have the same morals.

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Click and Clunk-A 5 Step Reading Strategy for Students


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:43 PM

This one page infographic provides a five step reading stategy for students using super heroes to help them become enaged. The five steps are:

Step 1: Preview the text for two to three minutes.

Step 2: Grab a pencil and read the passage aloud.

Step 3: What "clicked?"

Step 4: What "cluncked?"

Step 5: Put fix-up strategies into play.

Suggestions are provided in all but Step 2. Consider printing a copy of this out and using it as a poster in your room...or perhaps sending a copy home with students whom might need additional support!

Kate JohnsonMcGregor's curator insight, March 20, 2014 8:25 AM

In our pursuit to make literacy skills accessible, this quick, 5-step infographic has appeal.  

Reading Power's curator insight, March 23, 2014 10:15 AM

This certainly infuses power in reading. What are some of your favorite strategies?

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What Kids Are Reading - 2013

What Kids Are Reading - 2013 | Middle  School  English and Reading | Scoop.it

"Have you ever wondered why students choose the books that they do? Renaissance Learning explored this question in the fifth-edition What Kids Are Reading report, which lists the top 40 books read by students in grades 1-12 in the 2011-2012 school year. Rankings are based on the Accelerated Reader database, the largest of its kind, which houses reading records for students who read 283 million books."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 11, 2013 10:29 PM

This post links to a page that will provide you access to the full report, the infographic (part of which is above), and a report summary. The full report also includes:
* Required high school reading from 1907 to 2012

* Caldecott and Newbury winners from 1922 to present

* A selection of the Common Core State Standards exemplars

There have been many shifts in reading over the last 100 years, and one shift is that the complexity of required reading has decreased. To learn more check any of the resources found through this link. If you prefer an oral version from NPR you can listen to (or read) a short piece aired on June 11th, 2013 called "What Kids are Reading, In School and Out" at http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2013/06/11/190669029/what-kids-are-reading-in-school-and-out.

Meryl Jaffe, PhD's comment, June 12, 2013 9:40 AM
Looks fascinating. Thanks.