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Using Office 365? Five Reasons to Consider a Security Upgrade

Using Office 365? Five Reasons to Consider a Security Upgrade | Microsoft | Scoop.it
““I have customers moving to Office 365, so they don’t need additional security.” As the support supervisor for Nuvotera, a premier SaaS security distributor, I often hear similar quotes from customers.”
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Call for Entries, 18th Japan Media Arts Festival

“ The Japan Media Arts Festival is a comprehensive festival of Media Arts (Media Geijutsu) that honors outstanding works from a diverse range of media – from animation and comics to media art and games.”
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New gene discovered that stops spread of deadly cancer: Scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of a common lung cancer

New gene discovered that stops spread of deadly cancer: Scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of a common lung cancer | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ A gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body has been discovered by researchers, indicating a new way to fight one of the world’s deadliest cancers. By identifying the cause of this metastasis, which often happens quickly in lung cancer and results in a bleak survival rate, scientists are able to explain why some tumors are more prone to spreading than others. The newly discovered pathway may also help researchers understand and treat the spread of melanoma and cervical cancers.”
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Squink Lets You Print A Circuit Board For The Price Of A Cup Of Coffee

Squink Lets You Print A Circuit Board For The Price Of A Cup Of Coffee | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“3D printing has changed the way engineers test products, allowing them to cut down on time and costs. But what about 3D printing the components that go into.”Learn more:- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=3D-Printing
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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 15, 2014 12:26 AM

3D printing has changed the way engineers test products, allowing them to cut down on time and costs. But what about 3D printing the components that go into..


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Millennial Women Are Not Cutting the Cord | AdWeek.com

Millennial Women Are Not Cutting the Cord | AdWeek.com | Microsoft | Scoop.it
A new report from the Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau says that millennials, women 18-24 in particular, are not cutting the cord as quickly as previously thought.In fact, TV's share of viewing hours grew from 84 to 88 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 (data in the study was sourced from the Nielsen Cross-Platform Report), from 129 total hours out of 133 overall to 111 hours out of 113 overall. Yes, that's still shrinkage in terms of absolute time spent (and the cable-free rate for men is higher), but it is notably less time watching digital video.Further, the study found that young women spend nearly four times as much of their time watching cable as they do broadcast—more than 16 hours surfing cable vs. 4.5 with the broadcast networks. Much of that may simply be that the women in this survey are predominately college students, but the CAB sees it as a hopeful sign.Danielle Delauro, svp, strategic sales insights for CAB, concedes that digital video is getting bigger, but says that that's not necessarily a bad thing for TV. "[Young women] are consuming more video than ever before in their lives, but that's additive to television," she said. "People are always just looking for whatever the best screen available is, and the best screen is television across all demographics."While it is admittedly in the business of television, the CAB says it has data to back up the claim that people prefer the TV to the mobile phone or the tablet.Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Six Ways to Supercharge your Contests with Social Media

Six Ways to Supercharge your Contests with Social Media | Microsoft | Scoop.it
Social media contests: Discover how Intuit QuickBooks used social media to supercharge their contest, promoting their mission and vision to their audience.Do you want to promote your company’s mission and vision to your target audience?Are you wondering how to get the most out of your contests with social media?In this article you’ll discover how Intuit QuickBooks used social media to supercharge their Small Business Big Game contest, promoting their mission and vision to their target audience....
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 3, 2014 2:06 AM

Great tips and an excellent social marketing case study.

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Does Social Media Marketing Work for Everyone?

Does Social Media Marketing Work for Everyone? | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“Who does social media affect, and how will this change in the future? ... 62% of Americans stating that social media, a hot ticket in the marketing world, ...”
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The Best Times to Post on #Facebook [infographic] #socialmedia

The Best Times to Post on #Facebook  [infographic] #socialmedia | Microsoft | Scoop.it
The Best Times to Post on #Facebook [infographic] #socialmedia
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A Simple Guide for Manufacturers on When to Choose a Robot

A Simple Guide for Manufacturers on When to Choose a Robot | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ When considering automation, the first thing that many people will imagine is a robot. As a result, many of us who work in the design of automated systems find that we receive a lot of questions about robots, some of which suggest an inaccurate understand”
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iOS to Android in 7 steps

iOS to Android in 7 steps | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ Marmalade Juice, a service added recently to the Marmalade SDK, enables developers to publish iOS apps on Android by adding the ‘clang’ compiler and support for core app APIs on top of the C++ SDK. This enables native iOS Objective-C titles to deploy as native code on Android with no virtual machine, so, most importantly, the code runs fast. So how does it actually work and what steps get you from Objective-C to Android? We’ve put together a simple 7 step guide to help get you started. 1. Conversion Process”
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SpaceX Versus Senator Shelby's Rocket to Nowhere

SpaceX Versus Senator Shelby's Rocket to Nowhere | Microsoft | Scoop.it
Should Elon Musk and the engineers at Space Exploration Technologies Corp., do more paperwork? Senator Richard Shelby, Republican of Alabama, thinks so. He has inserted language into a Senate appropriations bill to force private space entrepreneurs such as Musk to navigate the kind of red tape that has transformed NASA into a directionless, sclerotic bureaucracy. Even worse, the provision guarantees to perpetuate U.S. dependence on Russian rockets to deliver Americans into space at a cost of $70 million per astronaut.
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California wake up call is Verizon's headache | Steve Blum's Blog

California wake up call is Verizon's headache | Steve Blum's Blog | Microsoft | Scoop.it
Verizon’s objections to proposed changes for broadband infrastructure subsidies from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF) would be forgivable coming from an east coast venture capitalist who woke up on Redondo Beach with a raging hangover and a contract stapled to his naked chest awarding him ownership of the local telephone system. But not from an incumbent telco that claims to be perpetually upgrading its network in California.In a ranting letter, submitted as comments on a draft of new CASF rules last week, a Verizon staff lobbyist wrote…"The draft would require existing providers to submit a letter by September 26, 2014 that declares its intent to upgrade any area in all of California that is not served. This would require each provider to inventory all of its service areas, identify all households that are unserved or underserved, analyze the areas to determine if an upgrade is feasible, and prepare letter [sic] identifying these areas."Let’s see. Inventory service areas and identify under and unserved homes? Supposedly, Verizon does that every six months when it reports its broadband coverage to the CPUC. Having worked with that data, though, I can understand why Verizon might be worried that it doesn’t have a good grasp on what it’s actually doing. Determine if an upgrade is feasible? Isn’t that what it did when it invested millions – no, hundreds of millions – of dollars upgrading its wireline infrastructure in California. But sure, Verizon might have just thrown darts at a map.Click headline to read more and watch video clip--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Twitter and the Physician – On the Etiquette of Trolls

Twitter and the Physician – On the Etiquette of Trolls | Microsoft | Scoop.it
Dino Ramzi, MD, MPH is a family physician who practices in Washington State and blogs at DinoRamzi.com. You can follow him on Twitter at @dwramzimdmph.**What is earnest is not always true; on the contrary, error is often more earnest than truth. – Benjamin DisraeliI was recently called a troll on Twitter by academic physicians at two universities, one to which I was once affiliated. When I looked it up, I found that a troll is “a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting arguments or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory, extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community, either accidentally or with the deliberate intent of provoking readers into an emotional response.” I wanted to strike back, but with wise counsel and some peace in my heart, I decided not to act like a troll.The internet is proving no different than other forms of speech; it is fraught with rules of conduct and the opportunity for conflict. State medical boards, the American Medical Association and the Federation of State Medical Boards have written guidelines describing the limits to appropriate social media interactions for physicians. Most of these guidelines understandably focus on interactions with patients, but the FSMB comments on professionalism between physicians, albeit vaguely.Having been active on social media for over a decade, I have found that the combination of anonymity and the emotions aroused by poor grammar and typos mix poorly with the power to publish at a moment’s notice. It is also difficult not to allow professional and personal unhappiness to seep too deeply into one’s writing. The unhappiness is fleeting, the posts are more permanent.Some of the conversations I have seen and been involved in would raise the hackles of many a state medical board or academic employer. People do not speak with each other online as we would face-to-face. In academic circles, I would be invited to thoracic surgeons’ homes to dine and occasionally to spar politely with the chief of cardiology. But online, the discussion does not hide professional contempt and degenerates swiftly to the direst rants. I am aware of at least one urologist who lost an academic appointment after “losing it” during an online academic dispute.Conversational flash points with subspecialists have included PSA screening, mammography, and most recently, CT screening for lung cancer. It is amazing how physicians react when their authority is challenged. There is a lot of shoddy science out there being accepted as fact without good grounding in clinical epidemiology. Physicians who raise doubts about the effectiveness or value of screening are frequently the target of unwarranted online opprobrium.My primary concern is that screening is a population health measure, and while I want to understand the perspectives of subject experts, they are less qualified than primary care scientists to make decisions regarding screening policy. Make no mistake, I am a family physician and, like most generalists, have been exposed to specialists who belittle my knowledge, skills and credentials; it comes with the territory. Still, it stunning to hear disease experts repudiate the input of their more statistically-inclined colleagues. Screening, properly understood, has nothing to do with expertise in the disease. Surgical expertise and understanding of the biological behavior of various types of cancer cells does not translate into a basic understanding of epidemiology 101.My second concern is the professionalism of the discourse. The disputes in question are essentially scientific, although the medium is better-suited for marketing than academic discussion. Claims like “you have your study and I have mine,” as I have heard, are not helpful to the integrity of the debate itself. There has to be an approach to dialogue that does not take a page out of the strategic communications handbook. In both the mammographyand PSA controversies, urologists and other lobbies applied tremendous pressure on the population health experts to generate recommendations favorable to their cause, a process which undermines the credibility of science itself.My third concern arises from my reading of the FSMB's guidelines on social media. The FSMB would suggest that physicians should be held to a higher standard of behavior, which means avoiding profanity even if goaded. Physicians inexperienced in social media may fly off of the cuff, especially given that 140 character messages can lead to misunderstanding. Much better to ask repeated clarification, especially on the part of physicians exercised in the art of nuance, who can frequently take 4 to 5 posts to express themselves properly. When ideas are condensed, it is easy to miss two or three layers of allusion or implication. Better to take it into a medium better suited to lengthier discussions of ideas.Remember that social media are public media where professional respect and a higher standard of behavior is expected, not for personal reasons or pride, but for the integrity of the scientific debate. We can all learn from each other, in person and online. Think before you post, or consider bouncing words written in anger off a trusted colleague before posting.
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How to Prepare for an Office 365 Migration

How to Prepare for an Office 365 Migration | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“Take these steps to transition from an on-premises environment to Software as a Service.”
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Why You Shouldn't Panic About Ebola

Why You Shouldn't Panic About Ebola | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ ANALYSIS - It is a frightening prospect to have a disease with a 80-90% mortality rate so close to home. People are concerned that once Ebola arrives in the US, people here will get sick and the d...”
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Disruppity's curator insight, August 4, 2014 8:42 PM

So...if you have been keeping up with all of the play-by-play news coverage about the two Ebola patients who have been shipped to Atlanta, you might be interested to know that as much as the media wants you to panic...you shouldn't.

 

Dr. Danielle N. Lee, who has worked for years as a field ecologist has been up close and personal with the virus in her own studies, and even goes as far to say that Ebola is actually studied here in the United States in secured laboratories.

 

As with anything, it is important to remember to do your own research, and to not let everything you hear in the news media dictate your emotions. At the end of the day, we still have to remember that God is in control, and to keep our faith in Him.

 

For more reasons on why you shouldn't make too much of an uproar about an Ebola pandemic, read the full story here:

 

http://thegrio.com/2014/08/04/please-dont-panic-about-ebola-heres-what-you-need-to-know/

 

For more news on faith and current events, visit www.disruppity.com

 

 

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New competition! Win a year's subscription to Office 365 Home

New competition! Win a year's subscription to Office 365 Home | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“In the second of our (hopefully) regular competitions, we have quite a treat for you. You've read the headline so you should know what's up for grabs, but if you missed it, the prize is a year's subscription to Office 365 Home worth $99.99.”
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Microsoft brings better document collaboration to Office 365

Microsoft brings better document collaboration to Office 365 | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“With the introduction of Office 2013, Microsoft brought software as a service to the table -- something some analysts had long expected would happen. Under the moniker of Office 365, the company introduced a subscription model that allows for a monthly or annual fee and grants five licences to each person or family.”
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Sony SmartBand review - specs, comparison and best price (Wired UK)

Sony SmartBand review - specs, comparison and best price (Wired UK) | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ Wired.co.uk reviews the Sony SmartBand”
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Wireless Commons Part 1: Interference Is a Myth, but the FCC Hasn't Caught on Yet | community broadband networks

Wireless Commons Part 1: Interference Is a Myth, but the FCC Hasn't Caught on Yet | community broadband networks | Microsoft | Scoop.it
This is the first in two-part series on spectrum basics and how we could better manage the spectrum to encourage innovation and prevent either large corporations or government from interfering with our right to communicate.We often think of all our wireless communications as traveling separate on paths: television, radio, Wi-Fi, cell phone calls, etc. In fact, these signals are all part of the same continuous electromagnetic spectrum. Different parts of the spectrum have different properties, to be sure - you can see visible light, but not radio waves. But these differences are more a question of degree than a fundamental difference in makeup. As radio, TV, and other technologies were developed and popularized throughout the 20th century, interference became a major concern. Any two signals using the same band of the spectrum in the same broadcast range would prevent both from being received, which you have likely experienced on your car radio when driving between stations on close frequencies – news and music vying with each other, both alternating with static. To mitigate the problem, the federal government did what any Econ 101 textbook says you should when you have a “tragedy of the commons” situation in which more people using a resource degrades it for everyone: they assigned property rights. This is why radio stations tend not to interfere with each other now.The Federal Communications Commission granted exclusive licenses to the spectrum in slices known as bands to radio, TV, and eventually telecom companies, ensuring that they were the only ones with the legal right to broadcast on a given frequency range within a certain geographic area. Large bands were reserved for military use as well.Originally, these licenses came free of charge, on the condition that broadcasters meet certain public interest requirements. Beginning in 1993, the government began to run an auction process, allowing companies to bid on spectrum licenses. That practice continues today whenever any space on the spectrum is freed up. (For a more complete explanation of the evolution of licensing see this excellent Benton foundation blog post.)Although there have been several redistributions over the decades, the basic architecture remains. Communications companies own exclusive licenses for large swaths of the usable spectrum, with most other useful sections reserved for the federal government’s defense and communications purposes (e.g. aviation and maritime navigation). Only a few tiny bands are left open as free, unlicensed territory that anyone can use.Click headline to read more and view the Spectrum Frequency Allocation Chart--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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What Do Doctors Think Of Apple's HealthKit?

What Do Doctors Think Of Apple's HealthKit? | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ It has tremendous potential. I watched the keynote, and initially Healthkit seemed fairly unremarkable, just another way for consumer apps like Nike+ and sleep trackers to output their data into pretty charts. A cursory look at their website (Apple – iOS 8 – Health) would seem to support the view that Healthkit is targeted at those obsessed with the “quantified self” movement: Calories burned? Sleep? Heart rate? This type of fitness-oriented data isn’t particularly interesting, as it’s been done before in a thousand different iterations, starting with pen and paper. Why should I care? We’re then shown this screen, however, and from a clinical perspective, there are 4 key points of interest, particularly since Epic Systems (one of the largest EMR vendors in the nation) was mentioned in the keynote: There’s also this: Suddenly, I’m interested. Imagine if with just your phone, you could travel with all of your former imaging studies (e.g. chest X-rays, CT scans). Your verified vaccination records. Your biopsy results. Your list of allergies. Your lab tests from the last 10, 15, 20 years. All the medications and doses you’ve ever been on, for what time period, and why. Your heart rate and blood pressure measurements from every clinic visit you’ve ever made. What if all of this was kept in the cloud, with instant access through your phone? What if, with Touch ID, you could grant access to this wealth of data to any new physician/system, with a single tap of your finger? Take a moment to see how medical records currently go from institution to institution. Then come back and think about this. This could be revolutionary. The lung cancer patient in New York who wants to move to Michigan to be closer with her extended family now has significantly more peace of mind, knowing that her health data can easily move with her. She doesn’t have to drudge through the paperwork to release her own medical records from her prior hospital system. She doesn’t have to make a separate trip to the radiology department to have them burn her a CD/DVD of all of her imaging. She doesn’t have to burden her new oncologist with the task of sifting through hundreds of sheets of results by hand, as she can release them into the new EMR with a single tap of a finger. She doesn’t have to worry about whether the images on the disc will be compatible with her new radiologist’s system, as the cloud automatically adjusts the data format to match. The trauma patient who arrives in a lower-acuity ER after a motor vehicle accident and is found to have a severe unstable ankle fracture on imaging can now be more easily transferred to a higher-level hospital with orthopedic surgery on call. The patient has his X-rays in the cloud. Within minutes of arrival at the new hospital, he opens his phone and grants access to the X-rays to his surgeon. The surgeon downloads them onto his Retina display iPad, quickly assessing the nature of the fracture to determine whether or not the patient requires emergent operation. Again: no drudging through paperwork. No waiting to process a CD/DVD. Less hassle. More clinical care. I feel that Healthkit might well be the first step in creating something akin to a universal EMR. If Apple pulls this off with the right partners, they could potentially solve one of the single worst problems in healthcare today: the inability to easily transfer patient records from one care location to another. This question originally appeared on Quora: What do doctors think of HealthKit? More questions: ”Medicine and Healthcare:Is it true that oncologists refuse to be treated for terminal cancer? Doctors:What do doctors think about 23andme?Apple:Why did Tim Cook need to attack Android at WWDC 2014?
Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, dbtmobile, Celine Sportisse
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Marisa Maiocchi's curator insight, July 2, 2014 7:07 AM

Me parece una exageración solo para fanáticos del estilo de vida saludable. Una cosa es cuidar la salud y otra muy distinta es estar pendiente de parámetros vitales...  ¿Y qué de las horas que se dedican al trabajo, a la familia, a la recreación? ¿Y qué de emplear el tiempo en hacer cosas que nos gustan? ¿Vendrá con un medidor de felicidad o de alegría?

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Massachusetts Orders State Utilities To Modernize Grid | Renew-Grid.com

Massachusetts Orders State Utilities To Modernize Grid | Renew-Grid.com | Microsoft | Scoop.it
The Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities (DPU) has issued two orders requiring state electric distribution companies to modernize the electric grid. Although other states have certainly done their part to spur smart grid efforts, the Gov. Deval Patrick administration claims the DPU orders make Massachusetts "the first state in the nation to require electric distribution companies to take affirmative and far-reaching steps to modernize the electric grid."“The grid modernization order builds on Governor Patrick’s commitment to strategic investments in innovation and infrastructure and creates jobs,” says Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Maeve Vallely Bartlett. “By implementing grid modernization, Massachusetts will once again be leading the nation in the clean energy revolution and enabling customers to participate in how and when they consume energy.”The DPU’s order requires each state utility to develop and implement a 10-year grid modernization plan, to be updated regularly. The DPU determined grid modernization will provide several benefits, including the following:Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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I caught Ebola in Guinea and survived

I caught Ebola in Guinea and survived | Microsoft | Scoop.it
The number of people who have contracted the Ebola virus in Guinea, according to the World Health Organization, has risen to 208 - and 136 of them have died. About half of these cases have been confirmed in a laboratory - earlier cases were not tested.
Via Hannah Davis, Mel Melendrez-Vallard
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Download Fruit Ninja 1.9.2 Free Android Game

Download Fruit Ninja 1.9.2 Free Android Game | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ Download the Fruit ninja1.9.2 with the latest update for the android mobile and have the latest update for the new version game”
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With Tech Tools, How Should Teachers Tackle Multitasking In Class?

With Tech Tools, How Should Teachers Tackle Multitasking In Class? | Microsoft | Scoop.it
“ Educators, students, and parents have noticed how schoolwork suffers when attention is split between homework and a buzzing smartphone. Read how teachers are responding.”
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Pretty Much Everyone (Except The FCC) Thinks Internet Fast Lanes Are A Bad Idea | Consumerist.com

Pretty Much Everyone (Except The FCC) Thinks Internet Fast Lanes Are A Bad Idea | Consumerist.com | Microsoft | Scoop.it
This morning the House Judiciary Committee held another hearing about net neutrality. While the members of Congress and expert witnesses are sitting on Capitol Hill arguing with each other over antitrust law, the public is clear on one thing: paid prioritization is a bad, bad idea.Our colleagues down the hall at Consumer Reports have been quite busy with surveys this spring. In a nationally representative poll, they’ve found that well over half of respondents, 58%, believe that regulators should absolutely not allow ISPs to enter paid prioritization deals. No fast lanes: no way, no how.The findings echo what the overwhelming majority of the 187,897 (and counting) public comments to the FCC have said. There is also a (largely symbolic) pending bill in the House and Senate that would require the FCC to ban “fast lane” paid prioritization arrangements.Consumers Union, the advocacy arm of Consumer Reports, shared the survey results with the House Judiciary Committee in a letter that was added to the record at the hearing this morning (full text below).The public comment period for the FCC’s proposed open internet rule ends on July 15. If you have thoughts about net neutrality and paid prioritization, here’s how to let them know.The full text of Consumers Union’s letter:Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Retweet if you want a free internet
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