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Eat the fat of Hull

Eat the fat of Hull | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Fat-eating bacteria are being put into Hull's sewers to try to get rid of fat blockages. Yorkshire Water said it was targeting seven locations across the city where there were build-ups of fat deposits. The firm is deploying "organically grown bacillus bacteria, which is commonly found in the human gut", to eat the fat, oils and grease. (???)

Video: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16343669

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Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention

Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

This sponsored collection of nine new articles, includes four reviews and five research articles, published in PLoS Medicine and PLoS ONE, in conjunction with the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The collection highlights how scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) for HIV prevention in eastern and southern Africa can help prevent HIV, not only at individual but also at community and population level, as well as leading to substantial cost savings for countries as a result of averted treatment and care costs.

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Paula Silva's comment, March 4, 6:44 AM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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New MRSA bacteria test developed

New MRSA bacteria test developed | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

A test to show whether wounds or lesions have been infected with bacteria including MRSA has been developed by Edinburgh University scientists. It works by taking swabs from a wound or sores, which are then analysed using a strip with electrical sensors that can detect MRSA. It is hoped the tests will allow almost immediate detection of the bacteria.

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Using viruses to beat superbugs #sgmdub

Using viruses to beat superbugs #sgmdub | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Viruses that can target and destroy bacteria have the potential to be an effective strategy for tackling hard-to-treat bacterial infections. The development of such novel therapies is being accelerated in response to growing antibiotic resistance, says Dr David Harper at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin.

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FOOD TECHNOLOGIST's curator insight, June 22, 2013 10:09 PM

Using viruses to beat superbugs

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HPA - More than 9,000 TB cases reported in 2011

HPA - More than 9,000 TB cases reported in 2011 | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Provisional figures released today by the Health Protection Agency (HPA) show there were 9,042 new cases of tuberculosis (TB) in the UK in 2011. Compared to provisional numbers reported in 2010 (8,587), this is a five per cent increase.

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Antibiotic resistance genes accumulating in Lake Geneva

Antibiotic resistance genes accumulating in Lake Geneva | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Large quantities of antibiotic-resistant bacteria enter the environment via municipal -- and especially hospital -- wastewater streams. Although wastewater treatment plants reduce the total number of bacteria, the most hazardous -- multiresistant -- strains appear to withstand or even to be promoted by treatment processes.

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Biomining - bacteria mine copper

Biomining - bacteria mine copper | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Say bacteria. People think infection. Or yogurts.

But in Chile, bacteria are being used to get at something we depend heavily on: copper.

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WHO: antibiotic resistance strategy revealed

WHO: antibiotic resistance strategy revealed | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

WHO has just published a new report (“The evolving threat of antimicrobial resistance - Options for action”) that sets out a global strategy for fighting antibiotic resistance. It explores how over past decades, bacteria that cause common infections have gradually developed resistance to each new antibiotic developed, and how AMR has evolved to become a worldwide health threat. In particular, the report highlights that there is currently a lack of new antibiotics in development and outlines some of the measures needed to prevent a potential global crisis in healthcare.

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Greece on the breadline: HIV and malaria make a comeback

Greece on the breadline: HIV and malaria make a comeback | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

The incidence of HIV/AIDS among intravenous drug users in central Athens soared by 1,250% in the first 10 months of 2011 compared with the same period the previous year, according to the head of Médecins sans Frontières Greece, while malaria is becoming endemic in the south for the first time since the rule of the colonels.

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Doggy Style

Doggy Style | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine has the first evidence that an Epstein Barr-like virus can infect and may also be responsible for causing lymphomas in man’s best friend.

Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682212001183

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Eat the fat of Hull

Eat the fat of Hull | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Fat-eating bacteria are being put into Hull's sewers to try to get rid of fat blockages. Yorkshire Water said it was targeting seven locations across the city where there were build-ups of fat deposits. The firm is deploying "organically grown bacillus bacteria, which is commonly found in the human gut", to eat the fat, oils and grease. (???)

Video: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-16343669

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First aid for winemakers

First aid for winemakers | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it
Whether or not a wine turns out to be as outstanding as the winemaker hopes depends on the quality of the yeasts; they control the fermentation process and create the distinctive flavor.
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Novel Gene linked to herpes-related cold sores

Novel Gene linked to herpes-related cold sores | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Researchers have identified a human chromosome containing a specific gene associated with susceptibility to herpes simplex labialis (HSL), the common cold sore. The gene C21ORF91 encodes a cytoplasmic protein with currently unknown function. Cold sores occur when the herpes virus reactivates from its quiescent state within the nerve, infecting the lip, nose, or face.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Chris Upton + helpers
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Influenza animation

Animation of the mechanism of an influenza virus and how Crucell's antibodies target the HA1 proteins on the virus and prevent further spread of influenza.

 


Via Ed Rybicki
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Why all our bird flu research should be published

Why all our bird flu research should be published | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

Ab Osterhaus: "Our experiments have sparked concerns about bio-terrorism. But fear must never stop research"

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DNA Sequencing, Without the Fuss

DNA Sequencing, Without the Fuss | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

DNA sequencing technology has been improving by leaps and bounds in recent years, with several techniques vying for supremacy. Now an upstart technology, called nanopore sequencing, looks ready to jump to the front of the pack. Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that they can continuously read the chemical letters DNA as it travels through a tiny pore, paving the way for a new kind of sequencing machine that decodes DNA much like an announcer reading a ticker tape. The advance might drop the cost of sequencing a complete human genome below $1000, which is expected to revolutionize personalized medicine and help usher in a new era of genetic-based diagnostics and medicines.

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Let Them Eat Dirt

Let Them Eat Dirt | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

A new study suggests early exposure to microbes is essential for normal immune development, supporting the so-called “hygiene hypothesis” which states that lack of such exposure leads to an increased risk of autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the study found that early-life microbe exposure decreases the number of inflammatory immune cells in the lungs and colon, lowering susceptibility to asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases later in life. The finding, published in Science, may help explain why there has been a rise in autoimmune diseases in sterile, antibiotic-saturated developed countries.

Microbial exposure during early life has persistent effects on natural killer T cell function, Science, doi:10.1126/science.1219328, 2012. 

 

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Trivalent oral polio vaccine faces ban

Trivalent oral polio vaccine faces ban | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it
An anti-polio vaccine, being used in India since 1978, could be shelved soon.

The India Expert Advisory Group (IEAG) on polio has recommended that the nation should stop the use of trivalent oral polio vaccine (TOPV), and only rely on the oral bivalent variant.

Experts say chances of vaccine derived polio virus infection (VDPV) are higher with the use of TOPV (that targets all three strains of polio virus - P1, P2 and P3) against the bivalent vaccine (that targets only P1 and P3).

However, the World Health Organization (WHO) will take a final call in April after the meeting of its Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization.

 

Makes sense: if you have no polio, using a live vaccine that is associated with reversion to virulence is not smart.


Via Ed Rybicki
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Lyme disease surge predicted for the northeastern USA

Lyme disease surge predicted for the northeastern USA | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

The northeastern USA should prepare for a surge in Lyme disease this spring. And we can blame fluctuations in acorns and mouse populations, not the mild winter. What do acorns have to do with illness? Acorn crops vary from year-to-year, with boom-and-bust cycles influencing the winter survival and breeding success of white-footed mice. These small mammals pack a one-two punch: they are preferred hosts for black-legged ticks and they are very effective at transmitting Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. We had a boom in acorns, followed by a boom in mice. And now, on the heels of one of the smallest acorn crops we've ever seen, the mouse population is crashing. This spring, there will be a lot of Borrelia burgdorferi-infected black-legged ticks in our forests looking for a blood meal. And instead of finding a white-footed mouse, they are going to find other mammals - like us.

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African Trypanosomiasis in Kenya

African Trypanosomiasis in Kenya | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

The form of trypanosomiasis seen in eastern and southeasthern Africa (rhodesiense) was recently reported in two European tourists who visited the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya. From 2000 to 2010, cases of human African trypoanosomiasis were reported in travelers who traveled to national parks, wildlife reserves, and game parks in Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Trypanosomiasis is a disease that has been historically found in this region of East Africa.

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HIV teens tell of life under the radar

HIV teens tell of life under the radar | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

There are around 12,000 young people in the UK and Ireland living with perinatally acquired HIV, contracted from their mother in the womb, at the point of delivery or shortly after birth, while being breastfed. They are a hidden group. Fiercely protected by a medical profession that never expected them to grow from babies into children, much less teenagers, they seek to exist under society's radar, to avoid being branded by the stigma that it attaches to HIV.

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Rabid puppy-dog imported into the Netherlands from Morocco via Spain

Rabid puppy-dog imported into the Netherlands from Morocco via Spain | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

This is the first case of rabies (caused by the classical rabies virus) in domestic and/or wild animals in the Netherlands since 1988.The accidental import of a rabid puppy led to a resource-intensive and costly public health response. A total of 48 known contacts in three different countries needed to be traced, of whom 45 required post-exposure treatment. Including the imported dog, three animals were euthanised.

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How world's smallest DNA virus evolved in rare parakeets

How world's smallest DNA virus evolved in rare parakeets | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

New insight into a rare virus that is threatening to wipe out the Mauritius parakeet - one of the world's most endangered species of parrot.

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Influenza virus budding requires F1Fo-ATPase

Influenza virus budding requires F1Fo-ATPase | MicrobiologyBytes | Scoop.it

The identification of host factors involved in virus replication is important to understand virus life cycles better. Accordingly, we sought host factors that interact with the influenza viral nonstructural protein 2 by using coimmunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry. Among proteins associating with nonstructural protein 2, we focused on the β subunit of the F1Fo-ATPase.

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Ed Rybicki's comment, March 7, 2012 5:59 AM
You know an interesting thing: that is almost certainly NOT true in a heterologous system, flu HA protein will bud out virus-like particles from plant (but not insect) cells, when expressed alone. Insect cells appear to need the M protein as well - but not NS2.