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Current Opinion in Virology - Rinderpest eradication: lessons for measles eradication?

Current Opinion in Virology - Rinderpest eradication: lessons for measles eradication? | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

In 2011 the Food and Agriculture Organization formally announced that rinderpest was eradicated from the globe. Rinderpest virus had long been associated with huge disease outbreaks among cattle.


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Scientists resolve debate over how many bacteria fight off invaders

Scientists resolve debate over how many bacteria fight off invaders | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Every inch of our body, inside and out, is oozing with bacteria. In fact, the human body carries 10 times the number of bacterial cells as human cells. Many are our friends, helping us digest food and fight off infections, for instance.
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Deep-ocean microbe is closest living relative of complex cells

Deep-ocean microbe is closest living relative of complex cells | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Genomic study of “Loki” supports a revisionist view of the origin of eukaryotes
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Implications of the Human Microbiome on Pharmaceutical Microbiology | American Pharmaceutical Review - The Review of American Pharmaceutical Business & Technology

Implications of the Human Microbiome on Pharmaceutical Microbiology | American Pharmaceutical Review - The Review of American Pharmaceutical Business & Technology | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Implications of the Human Microbiome on Pharmaceutical Microbiology
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Fecal transplants successful for treating C. difficile infection

Fecal transplants successful for treating C. difficile infection | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

Distasteful as it sounds, the transplantation of fecal matter is more successful for treating Clostridium difficile infections than previously thought. The research, published in the open access journal Microbiome, reveals that healthy changes to a patient's microbiome are sustained for up to 21 weeks after transplant, and has implications for the regulation of the treatment.

 

Clostridium difficile infections are a growing problem, leading to recurrent cases of diarrhea and severe abdominal pain, with thousands of fatalities worldwide every year. The infection is thought to work by overrunning the intestinal microbiome - the ecosystem of microorganisms that maintain a healthy intestine.

 

Fecal microbiota transplantation was developed as a method of treating C. difficile infection, and is particularly successful in patients who suffer repeat infections. Fecal matter is collected from a donor, purified, mixed with a saline solution and placed in a patient, usually by colonoscopy.

 

Previous research has shown that the fecal microbiota of patients resembles that of the donor, but not much is known about the short and long term stability of fecal microbiota transplanted into recipients.

In this research, Michael Sadowsky and colleagues at the University of Minnesota collected fecal samples from four patients before and after their fecal transplants. Three patients received freshly prepared microbiota from fecal matter and one patient received fecal microbiota that had previously been frozen. All received fecal microbiota from the same pre-qualified donor.

 

The team compared the pre- and post-transplant fecal microbial communities from the four patients, as well as from 10 additional patients with recurring C. difficile infections, to the sequences of normal subjects described in the Human Microbiome Project. In addition, they looked at the changes in fecal bacterial composition in recipients over time, and compared this to the changes observed within samples from the donor.

 

Surprisingly, after transplantation, patient samples appeared to sustain changes in their microbiome for up to 21 weeks and remained within the spectrum of fecal microbiota characterized as healthy.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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El descubrimiento de un nuevo antibiótico, la Teixobactina, en la prensa

El descubrimiento de un nuevo antibiótico, la Teixobactina, en la prensa | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Un equipo internacional de científicos descubre un nuevo antibiótico que combate bacterias como la que provoca el ántrax

Via SEM
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SEM's curator insight, January 8, 2:44 AM

La noticia de un nuevo método para crecer microorganismos sin necesidad de que sean aislados y así poder descubrir nuevas sustancias de interés biotecnológico aparece en diversos medios de la prensa escrita, como "El País" (enlace superior),

"El Mundo"

 (http://www.elmundo.es/salud/2015/01/07/54ad7acde2704e1d418b456d.html)

"ABC" (http://www.abc.es/salud/noticias/20150107/abci-antibiotico-nueva-familia-resistencia-201501071349.HTML)

 

En este caso se ha conseguido identificar a un nuevo tipo de sustancia antibiótica, la Teixobactina, que parecemostrar una gran efectividad frente a bacterias Gram positivas, entre ellas patógenos como el MRSA, Mycobacterium tuberculosis o Bacillus anthracis

 

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Mind Control of Gene Expression

Mind Control of Gene Expression | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

A human using mind control to activate the expression of a gene sounds like an improbable science fiction version of the Pied Piper story. In fact, it is a cutting edge fusion of cybernetics and synthetic biology--the brainchild of Martin Fussenegger at ETH Zurich—and may represent the future of drug therapy regimens automatically dictated by brain states.


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The year in microbiomes | Science News

The year in microbiomes | Science News | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
This year, scientists pegged microbes as important players in several aspects of human health, including obesity and cancer.
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Primitive microbes stole bacterial genes on a surprising scale

Primitive microbes stole bacterial genes on a surprising scale | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
A University of Otago researcher is part of an international team that has discovered that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) played a surprisingly large role in the evolution of primitive microbes known as archaea.
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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The Flawed Prokaryote

The Flawed Prokaryote | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
There are two types of biologist - those who think that prokaryotes exist and those who don't.

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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plant & Evolution
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Comparative Phylogenomics Uncovers the Impact of Symbiotic Associations on Host Genome Evolution

Comparative Phylogenomics Uncovers the Impact of Symbiotic Associations on Host Genome Evolution | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

Abstract

 

Mutualistic symbioses between eukaryotes and beneficial microorganisms of their microbiome play an essential role in nutrition, protection against disease, and development of the host. However, the impact of beneficial symbionts on the evolution of host genomes remains poorly characterized. Here we used the independent loss of the most widespread plant–microbe symbiosis, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM), as a model to address this question. Using a large phenotypic approach and phylogenetic analyses, we present evidence that loss of AM symbiosis correlates with the loss of many symbiotic genes in the Arabidopsis lineage (Brassicales). Then, by analyzing the genome and/or transcriptomes of nine other phylogenetically divergent non-host plants, we show that this correlation occurred in a convergent manner in four additional plant lineages, demonstrating the existence of an evolutionary pattern specific to symbiotic genes. Finally, we use a global comparative phylogenomic approach to track this evolutionary pattern among land plants. Based on this approach, we identify a set of 174 highly conserved genes and demonstrate enrichment in symbiosis-related genes. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that beneficial symbionts maintain purifying selection on host gene networks during the evolution of entire lineages.


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Pierre-Marc Delaux's curator insight, July 17, 2014 2:57 PM

Yeah!! Online finally :)

Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, July 17, 2014 3:28 PM

Paper from our lab!

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New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes | The Scientist Magazine®

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes | The Scientist Magazine® | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

Via Iain Haysom
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A revolutionary approach to studying the intestinal microbiota

A revolutionary approach to studying the intestinal microbiota | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
It is estimated that 100,000 billion bacteria populate the gut of each individual (or 10 to 100 times more than the number of cells in the human body), and their diversity is considerable, estimated to around a thousand different bacterial species...
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TWiM #82: Betrayal and Compromise

TWiM #82: Betrayal and Compromise | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson.  Vincent, Michael, Elio and Michele discuss how an endosymbiont betrays its aphid host to alert plant defenses, and a new immunosuppressive cell that allows infection...
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New Type of Archaea Represents Missing Link of Evolution from Bacteria to Eukaryotics

New Type of Archaea Represents Missing Link of Evolution from Bacteria to Eukaryotics | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
In a new study, published in Nature this week, a research team led from Uppsala University in Sweden presents the discovery of a new microbe that represents a missing link in the evolution of complex life.
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Microbe is relative of complex life

Microbe is relative of complex life | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
The new group of archaea was discovered in sediments along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge A newly discovered life form could help resolve one of the most contentious conundrums in modern biology.All organisms on Earth are classified as either...
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plant & Evolution
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Phylogenomic analyses indicate that early fungi evolved digesting cell walls of algal ancestors of land plants

As decomposers, fungi are key players in recycling plant material in global carbon cycles. We hypothesized that genomes of early diverging fungi may have inherited pectinases from an ancestral species that had been able to extract nutrients from pectin-containing land plants and their algal allies (Streptophytes). We aimed to infer, based on pectinase gene expansions and on the organismal phylogeny, the geological timing of the plant-fungus association. We analyzed 40 fungal genomes, three of which, including Gonapodya prolifera, were sequenced for this study. In the organismal phylogeny from 136 housekeeping loci, Rozella diverged first from all other fungi. Gonapodya prolifera was included among the flagellated, predominantly aquatic fungal species in Chytridiomycota. Sister to the Chytridiomycota were the predominantly terrestrial fungi including zygomycota I and II, along with the ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that comprise Dikarya. The Gonapodya genome has 27 genes representing five of the seven classes of pectin-specific enzymes known from fungi. Most of these share a common ancestry with pectinases from Dikarya. Indicating functional as well as sequence similarity,Gonapodya, like many Dikarya, can use pectin as a carbon source for growth in pure culture. Shared pectinases of Dikarya and Gonapodyaprovide evidence that even ancient aquatic fungi had adapted to extract nutrients from the plants in the green lineage. This implies that 750 million years, the estimated maximum age of origin of the pectin-containing streptophytes represents a maximum age for the divergence of Chytridiomycota from the lineage including Dikarya.


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FEMS Microbiol. Rev.: The battle for chitin recognition in plant-microbe interactions (2015)

FEMS Microbiol. Rev.: The battle for chitin recognition in plant-microbe interactions (2015) | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

Fungal cell walls play dynamic functions in interaction of fungi with their surroundings. In pathogenic fungi, the cell wall is the first structure to make physical contact with host cells. An important structural component of fungal cell walls is chitin, a well-known elicitor of immune responses in plants. Research into chitin perception has sparked since the chitin receptor from rice was cloned nearly a decade ago. Considering the widespread nature of chitin perception in plants, pathogens evidently evolved strategies to overcome detection, including alterations in the composition of cell walls, modification of their carbohydrate chains and secretion of effectors to provide cell wall protection or target host immune responses. Also non-pathogenic fungi contain chitin in their cell walls and are recipients of immune responses. Intriguingly, various mutualists employ chitin-derived signaling molecules to prepare their hosts for the mutualistic relationship. Research on the various types of interactions has revealed different molecular components that play crucial roles and, moreover, that various chitin-binding proteins contain dissimilar chitin-binding domains across species that differ in affinity and specificity. Considering the various strategies from microbes and hosts focused on chitin recognition, it is evident that this carbohydrate plays a central role in plant–fungus interactions.

 

Andrea Sánchez-Vallet , Jeroen R. Mesters , Bart P.H.J. Thomma


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Bacteria Can Cook Up Propane From Scratch

Bacteria Can Cook Up Propane From Scratch | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

 

Barbecues may one day be fueled by propane renewably generated by microbes. That's because scientists have for the first time genetically engineered E. coli, a bacterium commonly found in the human gut, to make propane. If scientists can develop a way for photosynthetic bacteria to produce this gas the same way, then solar-powered generation of this biofuel could become a reality.

Renewable fuels made by microbes are typically liquids. This is a problem for two reasons. One, the liquids might poison the microbes generating them. Two, separating and purifying the fuel from the solution that the microbes are growing in can be complex and costly.

One alternative might be the commonplace fuel propane, which microbes could, in theory, generate as a gas for easy and immediate extraction, reducing any toxic effects it could have on the microorganisms.


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Cooper Bryant James's curator insight, November 6, 2014 3:20 PM

The scientist that is working on creating fuel using bacteria is jay Keasling a role model of mine. I didnt know his research was this far along and i find his work very interesting.

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Archaea, bacteria, eucarya information - YouTube

First year students should find this useful for evolution/cell biology modules!
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Microbiology: Ditch the term pathogen

Microbiology: Ditch the term pathogen | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Disease is as much about the host as it is the infectious agent — the focus on microbes is hindering research into treatments, say Arturo Casadevall and Liise-anne Pirofski.
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Microbiologie
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Microbiote: des bactéries qui nous veulent du bien

Microbiote: des bactéries qui nous veulent du bien | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Il pèse entre un et cinq kilos, vit dans vos intestins et se nourrit de ce que vous avalez. Mais loin de vous être hostile, le microbiote est votre indispensable allié.

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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Fast and accurate identification - microbiology with MALDI-TOF biotyper
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MALDI-TOF Identification of the Human Gut Microbiome in People with and without Diarrhea in Senegal

MALDI-TOF Identification of the Human Gut Microbiome in People with and without Diarrhea in Senegal | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

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Praveen Rahi's curator insight, July 11, 2014 12:15 AM

a quick identification of bacterial species

Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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Robert Kennedy's Dangerous Anti-Vaccine Activism

Robert Kennedy's Dangerous Anti-Vaccine Activism | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is coming out with a new book that claims thimerosal in vaccines causes autism. This claim has been thoroughly discredited, but RFK Jr. believes that it's all a big conspiracy and that he's right. His crazy anti-vaccine views coupled with his fame make for an especially dangerous combination.

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New Findings in Environmental Microbiology Described from Oak ...

New Findings in Environmental Microbiology Described from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Comparative metagenomic and rRNA microbial diversity characterization using archaeal and bacterial synthetic communities) By a News Reporter- Staff News Editor...
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