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New insights into ancient life: Chromosome segregation in Archaea

New insights into ancient life: Chromosome segregation in Archaea | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
(PhysOrg.com) -- The effort to classify life into various groups has been a bumpy ride. Prior to the 1900s, living things were usually pegged as either plants or animals – period.
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Virology News
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Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine

Cow antibodies yield important clues for developing a broadly effective AIDS vaccine | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Credit: IAVI LA JOLLA - Cows are leaving the pasture and entering the field...of HIV vaccine research. As outlined in a study published today in Nature, lead author Devin Sok, Director, Antibody Di..

Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plant roots and rhizosphere
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Bacterial Biosensors for in Vivo Spatiotemporal Mapping of Root Secretion

Bacterial Biosensors for in Vivo Spatiotemporal Mapping of Root Secretion | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Plants engineer the rhizosphere to their advantage by secreting various nutrients and secondary metabolites. Coupling transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses of the pea (Pisum sativum) rhizosphere, a suite of bioreporters has been developed in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae strain 3841, and these detect metabolites secreted by roots in space and time. Fourteen bacterial lux fusion bioreporters, specific for sugars, polyols, amino acids, organic acids, or flavonoids, have been validated in vitro and in vivo. Using different bacterial mutants (nodC and nifH), the process of colonization and symbiosis has been analyzed, revealing compounds important in the different steps of the rhizobium-legume association. Dicarboxylates and sucrose are the main carbon sources within the nodules; in ineffective (nifH) nodules, particularly low levels of sucrose were observed, suggesting that plant sanctions affect carbon supply to nodules. In contrast, high myo-inositol levels were observed prior to nodule formation and also in nifH senescent nodules. Amino acid biosensors showed different patterns: a γ-aminobutyrate biosensor was active only inside nodules, whereas the phenylalanine bioreporter showed a high signal also in the rhizosphere. The bioreporters were further validated in vetch (Vicia hirsuta), producing similar results. In addition, vetch exhibited a local increase of nod gene-inducing flavonoids at sites where nodules developed subsequently. These bioreporters will be particularly helpful in understanding the dynamics of root exudation and the role of different molecules secreted into the rhizosphere.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Emerging Viruses, Virus Discovery and Virus Characterization
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New technology allows for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

New technology allows for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
New technology allows for rapid diagnosis of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Via Ian M Mackay, PhD
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Emerging Microbes & Infections - Histo-blood group antigens as receptors for rotavirus, new understanding on rotavirus epidemiology and vaccine strategy

Emerging Microbes & Infections - Histo-blood group antigens as receptors for rotavirus, new understanding on rotavirus epidemiology and vaccine strategy | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Emerging Microbes and Infections (EMI) is a new open access, fully peer-reviewed journal that will publish the best and most interesting research in emerging microbes and infectious disease.

Via Gilbert C FAURE
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Plant signalling in symbiosis and immunity 

Plant signalling in symbiosis and immunity  | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Plants encounter a myriad of microorganisms, particularly at the root–soil interface, that can invade with detrimental or beneficial outcomes. Prevalent beneficial associations between plants and microorganisms include those that promote plant growth by facilitating the acquisition of limiting nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. But while promoting such symbiotic relationships, plants must restrict the formation of pathogenic associations. Achieving this balance requires the perception of potential invading microorganisms through the signals that they produce, followed by the activation of either symbiotic responses that promote microbial colonization or immune responses that limit it.


Via Jean-Michel Ané
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Jean-Michel Ané's curator insight, March 21, 4:18 PM

Very good review

Nicolas Denancé's curator insight, March 22, 10:59 AM

Very good review

Sanjay Swami's curator insight, March 23, 4:47 AM
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Publications
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bioRxiv: Host autophagosomes are diverted to a plant-pathogen interface (2017)

bioRxiv: Host autophagosomes are diverted to a plant-pathogen interface (2017) | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

Filamentous plant pathogens and symbionts invade their host cells but remain enveloped by host-derived membranes. The mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and functions of these host-microbe interfaces are poorly understood. Recently, we showed that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation and deplete the selective autophagy receptor Joka2 from ATG8CL complexes. Here, we show that during P. infestans infection, ATG8CL autophagosomes are diverted to the pathogen interface. Our findings are consistent with the view that the pathogen coopts host selective autophagy for its own benefit.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Audiobook: Environmental Pollution Control Microbiology

Get your free audiobook or ebook: http://zaxo.space/sabk/35/en/B000OI0Z8U/book Environmental Pollution Control Microbiology: A Fifty-year Perspectiv
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Audiobook: The Evolution of Logic

Get your free audiobook or ebook: http://yazz.space/sabk/35/en/B004G5YY20/info Examines the relations between logic and philosophy over the last 150 years
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Popular Science
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The Viruses That Made Us Human — NOVA Next | PBS

The Viruses That Made Us Human — NOVA Next | PBS | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Viruses that infected our ancestors provided the genetic foundations for many traits that define us.

Via Neelima Sinha
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Host Cell & Pathogen Interactions
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Zika may cause microcephaly by activating TLR3

Zika may cause microcephaly by activating TLR3 | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Research shows that inhibiting this mechanism reduces brain cell damage, hinting at a new therapy to mitigating the effects of prenatal Zika virus infection

Via Kenzibit
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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Viruses help form biofilms

Viruses help form biofilms | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Bacteria frequently grow in communities called biofilms, which are aggregates of cells and polymers. Filamentous phages help them assemble.

Via Chris Upton + helpers
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A Snippet: Who Invented Agriculture, the Ants or the Bees?

by Elio
Agriculture was invented at the time of the dinosaurs, long before there was anything resembling a primate on earth. Take the example of the leaf cutting ants.
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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Protection Without a Vaccine

Protection Without a Vaccine | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
With a new type of gene therapy, scientists hope to engineer the body to resist infections.

Via Chris Upton + helpers
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Kathleen McLeod's curator insight, August 6, 2015 2:30 PM

What do you think? Could this be effective? Can you think of any better viral vectors for incorporation of the antibody DNA?

Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Top Selling Monoclonal Antibodies 2014
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Gut bacterial peptides with autoimmunity potential as environmental trigger for late onset complex diseases: In–silico study

Gut bacterial peptides with autoimmunity potential as environmental trigger for late onset complex diseases: In–silico study | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Recent evidences suggest that human gut microbiota with major component as bacteria can induce immunity. It is also known that gut lining depletes with ageing and that there is increased risk of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders with ageing. It is therefore likely that both may be correlated as depletion of gut lining exposes the gut bacterial antigens to host immune mechanisms, which may induce immunity to certain bacterial proteins, but at the same time such immunity may also be auto-immunogenic to host. This autoimmunity may make a protein molecule nonfunctional and thereby may be involved in late onset metabolic, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders such as, Diabetes, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Hyperlipidemias and Cancer. In this in-silico study we found a large number of peptides identical between human and gut bacteria which were binding to HLA-II alleles, and hence, likely to be auto-immunogenic. Further we observed that such autoimmune candidates were enriched in bacterial species belonging to Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla, which lead us to conclude that these phyla may have higher disease impact in genetically predisposed individuals. Functional annotation of human proteins homologous to candidate gut-bacterial peptides showed significant enrichment in metabolic processes and pathways. Cognitive trait, Ageing, Alzheimer, Type 2 diabetes, Chronic Kidney Failure (CKF), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and various Cancers were the major diseases represented in the dataset. This dataset provides us with gut bacterial autoimmune candidates which can be studied for their clinical significance in late onset diseases.

Via Krishan Maggon
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Virology News
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Taxonomy anarchy hampers conservation

Taxonomy anarchy hampers conservation | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

The classification of complex organisms is in chaos. Stephen T. Garnett and Les Christidis propose a solution.


And that solution in part is that leg- and leaf-ologists (aka animal and plant taxonomists) take the example of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. Excellent!


Via Ed Rybicki
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Viruses and Bioinformatics from Virology.uvic.ca
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How CRISPR can fight antibiotic-resistant infections

How CRISPR can fight antibiotic-resistant infections | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Researchers are developing a probiotic to make disease-causing bacteria self-destruct.

Via Bwana Moses
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plant roots and rhizosphere
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Live imaging of root–bacteria interactions in a microfluidics setup

Live imaging of root–bacteria interactions in a microfluidics setup | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Plant roots play a dominant role in shaping the rhizosphere, the environment in which interaction with diverse microorganisms occurs. Tracking the dynamics of root–microbe interactions at high spatial resolution is currently limited because of methodological intricacy. Here, we describe a microfluidics-based approach enabling direct imaging of root–bacteria interactions in real time. The microfluidic device, which we termed tracking root interactions system (TRIS), consists of nine independent chambers that can be monitored in parallel. The principal assay reported here monitors behavior of fluorescently labeled Bacillus subtilis as it colonizes the root of Arabidopsis thaliana within the TRIS device. Our results show a distinct chemotactic behavior of B. subtilis toward a particular root segment, which we identify as the root elongation zone, followed by rapid colonization of that same segment over the first 6 h of root–bacteria interaction. Using dual inoculation experiments, we further show active exclusion of Escherichia coli cells from the root surface after B. subtilis colonization, suggesting a possible protection mechanism against root pathogens. Furthermore, we assembled a double-channel TRIS device that allows simultaneous tracking of two root systems in one chamber and performed real-time monitoring of bacterial preference between WT and mutant root genotypes. Thus, the TRIS microfluidics device provides unique insights into the microscale microbial ecology of the complex root microenvironment and is, therefore, likely to enhance the current rate of discoveries in this momentous field of research.

Via Christophe Jacquet
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Amazing Science
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Cocktail of bacteria-killing viruses prevents cholera infection in animal models

Cocktail of bacteria-killing viruses prevents cholera infection in animal models | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

Oral administration of a cocktail of three viruses, all of which specifically kill cholera bacteria, prevents infection and cholera-like symptoms in animal model experiments, report scientists from Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts inNature Communications on Feb. 1. The findings are the first to demonstrate the potential efficacy of bacteria-killing viruses—known as bacteriophages, or phages—as an orally administered preventive therapy against an acute gastrointestinal bacterial disease.

 

“While phage therapy has existed for decades, our study is proof-of-principle that it can be used to protect against infection and intervene in the transmission of disease,” said senior study author Andrew Camilli, Ph.D., Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and professor of molecular biology and microbiology at TUSM. “We are hopeful that phages can someday be a tool in the public health arsenal that helps decrease the global burden of cholera, which affects up to four million people around the world each year.”

 

In previous work, Camilli and colleagues searched for phages that are specific for Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes cholera—a potentially lethal infectious disease marked by severe diarrhea and dehydration. While phages that kill V. cholerae are abundant in nature, the team identified three strains that uniquely retained the ability to kill V. cholerae within the small intestine, the site of infection in humans. These phages function by targeting bacterial surface receptors normally involved in infectiousness, making them ideal therapeutic candidates—to develop resistance, cholera bacteria must acquire mutations in these receptors, which cause the bacteria to become less infectious.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 13, 5:08 AM
While this great, it is a modern vindication of something no less a person that the co-discoverer of phages himself, Felix d'Herelle, advocated as a cure for dysentery - and put into practice in India in the 1920s, apparently (https://rybicki.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/happy-centenary-phages/). He was also the godfather of work done at the Eliava Institute in Georgia, which really laid the foundation of phage therapy.
Ed Rybicki's comment, February 13, 5:09 AM
Thanks! Great stuff.
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Audiobook: Evolution and Victorian Culture

Get your free audiobook or ebook: http://skyble.space/sabk/35/en/B00JXIIBO2/book In this collection of essays from leading scholars, the dynamic interpla
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Audiobook: Marsh and Martin's Oral Microbiology

Get your free audiobook or ebook: http://zaxo.space/sabk/35/en/B01K4UK9N8/book Now expanded with the latest information of relevance to current denta
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Audiobook: Microbiology and Immunology

Get your free audiobook or ebook: http://zaxo.space/sabk/35/en/B00EYMN412/book After purchasing this product, Amazon will e-mail you an Access Code an
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plants and Microbes
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Nature Microbiology: Fungal pathogenesis: Host modulation every which way (2016)

Nature Microbiology: Fungal pathogenesis: Host modulation every which way (2016) | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it

The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum secretes an effector that is similar to a plant peptide hormone, underscoring the variety of mechanisms that plant pathogens have evolved to tamper with host physiology.

 

Plant pathogens cause devastating diseases of crop plants and threaten food security in an era of continuous population growth. Annual losses due to fungal and oomycete diseases amount to enough food calories to feed at least half a billion people. Understanding how plant pathogens infect and colonize plants should help to develop disease-resistant crops. It appears that plant pathogens are sophisticated manipulators of their hosts. They secrete effector molecules that alter host biological processes in a variety of ways, generally promoting the pathogen lifestyle. A new study by Masachis, Segorbe and colleagues describes a new mechanism by which plant pathogens interfere with plant physiology. They discovered that the root-infecting fungus F. oxysporum secretes a peptide similar to the plant regulatory peptide RALF (rapid alkalinization factor) to induce host tissue alkalinization and enhance plant colonization. This study demonstrates that in addition to secreting classical plant hormones (or mimics thereof), fungi have also evolved functional homologues of plant peptides to alter host cellular processes.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
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Synthetic Biology: Engineering Microbes to Solve Global Challenges - Jay Keasling

http://www.ibiology.org/ibioeducation/taking-courses/synthetic-biology-course.html Dr.


Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Mystery microbes in our gut could be a whole new form of life - New Scientist

Mystery microbes in our gut could be a whole new form of life - New Scientist | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Genetic analysis of microbial DNA from our guts suggests there is a whole new domain of life lurking inside our own bodies – the dark matter of life
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Rescooped by Franc Viktor Nekrep from Plant-Microbe Symbiosis
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Microbiomes in light of traits: A phylogenetic perspective

Microbiomes in light of traits: A phylogenetic perspective | mikrobiologija | Scoop.it
Microbial communities—microbiomes—are intricately linked to human health and critical ecosystem services. New technologies allow the rapid characterization of hundreds of samples at a time and provide a sweeping perspective on microbiome patterns. However, a systematic understanding of what determines microbiome diversity and composition and its implications for system functioning is still lacking. A focus on the phenotypic characteristics of microorganisms—their traits—offers a path for interpreting the growing amount of microbiome data. Indeed, a variety of trait-based approaches have been proposed for plants and animal communities, and this approach has helped to clarify the mechanisms underlying community assembly, diversity-process relationships, and ecosystem responses to environmental change.

Although there is a growing emphasis on microbial traits, the concept has not been fully appreciated in microbiology. However, a trait focus for microorganisms may present an even larger research opportunity than for macro-organisms. Not only do microorganisms play a central role in nutrient and energy cycling in most systems, but the techniques used to characterize microbiomes usually provide extensive molecular and phylogenetic information.

ADVANCES
One major difference between macro- and microorganisms is the potential for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in microbes. Higher rates of HGT mean that many microbial traits might be unrelated to the history of the vertically descended parts of the genome. If true, then the taxonomic composition of a microbiome might reveal little about the health or functioning of a system. We first review key aspects of microbial traits and then recent studies that document the distribution of microbial traits onto the tree of life. A synthesis of these studies reveals that, despite the promiscuity of HGT, microbial traits appear to be phylogenetically conserved, or not distributed randomly across the tree of life. Further, microbial traits appear to be conserved in a hierarchical fashion, possibly linked to their biochemical and genetic complexity. For instance, traits such as pH and salinity preference are relatively deeply conserved, such that taxa within deep clades tend to share the trait. In contrast, other traits like the ability to use simple carbon substrates or to take up organic phosphorus are shallowly conserved, and taxa share these traits only within small, shallow clades.

OUTLOOK
The phylogenetic, trait-based framework that emerges offers a path to interpret microbiome variation and its connection to the health and functioning of environmental, engineered, and human systems. In particular, the taxonomic resolution of biogeographic patterns provides information about the traits under selection, even across entirely different systems. Parallels observed among human and free-living communities support this idea. For instance, microbial traits related to growth on different substrates (e.g., proteins, fats, and carbohydrates) in the human gut appear to be conserved at approximately the genus level, a resolution associated with the level of conservation of glycoside hydrolase genes in bacteria generally. A focus on two particular types of traits—response and effect traits—may also aid in microbiome management, whether that means maintaining human health or mitigating climate change impacts. Future work on microbial traits must consider three challenges: the influence of different trait measurements on cross-study comparisons; correlations between traits within and among microorganisms; and interactions among microbial traits, the environment, and other organisms. Our conclusions also have implications for the growing field of community phylogenetics beyond applications to microorganisms.

Via Jean-Michel Ané
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