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Soil Microbes Go Beyond Antibiotic Resistance to Eating Antibiotics

Soil Microbes Go Beyond Antibiotic Resistance to Eating Antibiotics | Microbe | Scoop.it
Superbugs that can survive antibiotics have become a major concern.
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Microbiology news // Noticas de microbiología
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Kawasaki disease looks like a virus, but could cause permanent heart damage ... - The Denver Channel

Kawasaki disease looks like a virus, but could cause permanent heart damage ... - The Denver Channel | Microbe | Scoop.it
The Denver Channel
Kawasaki disease looks like a virus, but could cause permanent heart damage ...
The Denver Channel
Doctors: early detection is crucial. cooper-in-hospital_1367455352657.jpg.
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Altered Gut Microbes Key to Bypass Surgery Success | HMS

Altered Gut Microbes Key to Bypass Surgery Success | HMS | Microbe | Scoop.it
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Drug-resistant bacteria and lack of new antibiotics pose ‘catastrophic threat’ : Nature News Blog

Drug-resistant bacteria and lack of new antibiotics pose ‘catastrophic threat’ : Nature News Blog | Microbe | Scoop.it
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As SARS-like virus hits 12th person, WHO urges countries to stay alert - Raw Story

As SARS-like virus hits 12th person, WHO urges countries to stay alert - Raw Story | Microbe | Scoop.it
Raw Story As SARS-like virus hits 12th person, WHO urges countries to stay alert Raw Story The World Health Organisation on Saturday urged countries to be vigilant over the spread of a potentially fatal SARS-like virus after a new case in Britain...
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Usutu Virus Highlights Importance of Disease Surveillance - The Disease Daily

Usutu Virus Highlights Importance of Disease Surveillance - The Disease Daily | Microbe | Scoop.it
Usutu Virus Highlights Importance of Disease Surveillance The Disease Daily A new virus previously only isolated in mosquitoes in tropical and subtropical Africa had somehow migrated to Europe and infected local bird species, which were susceptible...

Via Ed Rybicki
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 16, 2013 2:44 AM

Increasing spread of viruses out of Africa and Asia - and it's only going to get worse.

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Microbial predator and prey: Heliozoan gets euglena for lunch (video)


Via Cesar Sanchez
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Bioslogoss's comment, February 3, 2013 5:53 AM
Great video!
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Bacteria Are Blowing in the Wind | The Scientist Magazine®

Bacteria Are Blowing in the Wind | The Scientist Magazine® | Microbe | Scoop.it
New work shows that bacteria reach miles into the atmosphere, bolstering the notion that microbes can affect precipitation and cloud formation.
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wheather machines in the future? 

 

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Drinking water unexpectedly rich in microbial life

Drinking water unexpectedly rich in microbial life | Microbe | Scoop.it
Flow cytometry can now be officially used for the quantification of microbial cells in drinking water. The new analytical method provides much more realistic results than the conventional method, in which bacterial colonies are grown on agar plates.

Via Ed Rybicki
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, January 27, 2013 12:19 PM

Pretty much mirrors phage practicals we used to do in MCB here at UCT: tap water was always cleaner in terms of coliphages than bottled mineral water.  I'd still go with phages over flow cytometry, though: it was exquisitely sensitive, and a LOT cheaper.

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Immune cells engineered in lab to resist HIV infection, study shows

Immune cells engineered in lab to resist HIV infection, study shows | Microbe | Scoop.it
Researchers have found a novel way to engineer key cells of the immune system so they remain resistant to infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Via Ken Yaw Agyeman-Badu
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How bacteria adapt to antibiotics - Health24.com

How bacteria adapt to antibiotics - Health24.com | Microbe | Scoop.it
How bacteria adapt to antibiotics
Health24.com
Despite the remarkable success of antibiotics, bacterial infections remain a leading cause of death, and antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is a significant threat to public health.
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Symbiotic Microbes: How Insects Domesticate Bacteria

Symbiotic Microbes: How Insects Domesticate Bacteria | Microbe | Scoop.it

Colin Dale from the University of Utah discovered a new bacterium isolated from the infected wound of an Indiana man who impaled his hand on a tree branch. He and his team also found that the new bacterial strain, named HS, is related to Sodalis, a genus of bacteria that lives symbiotically inside insects’ guts in a mutually beneficial symbiotic relationships. The discovery solved an old mystery by showing that insects domesticate bacteria by picking them up from plants or animals in their environment, not from other insects. Colin Dale, the study’s senior author and an associate professor of biology, says the findings provide “a missing link in our understanding of how beneficial insect-bacteria relationships originate. Our work shows specifically that these relationships arise independently in each insect. This is a surprising conclusion: the insect picks up a pathogen that is widespread in the environment and then domesticates it. This happens independently in each insect.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Bacteria May Have Been Responsible For World's Biggest Extinction Event

Bacteria May Have Been Responsible For World's Biggest Extinction Event | Microbe | Scoop.it
Add this to the murderous microbe highlight reel--a single strain of bacteria could have worsened the Great Dying event 250 million years ago, producing (Bacteria May Have Been Responsible For World's Biggest Extinction Event
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Making your Christmas tree microbiological!

Making your Christmas tree microbiological! | Microbe | Scoop.it
If you haven’t got your Christmas tree up and trimmed already, why not make it microbiological?! A couple of weeks ago I came across this post on Exploring The Invisible (if you haven’t checked out this blog already, do so!

Via Naomi Osborne
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Coronavirus: is this the next pandemic?

Coronavirus: is this the next pandemic? | Microbe | Scoop.it
Last September a doctor in a Saudi hospital was fired for reporting a new, deadly strain of the coronavirus.
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Predicting Hotspots for Influenza Virus Reassortment - Vol. 19 No. 4 - April 2013 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC

Predicting Hotspots for Influenza Virus Reassortment - Vol. 19 No. 4 - April 2013 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC | Microbe | Scoop.it
The 1957 and 1968 influenza pandemics, each of which killed ≈1 million persons, arose through reassortment events. Influenza virus in humans and domestic animals could reassort and cause another pandemic.

Via burkesquires
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Appendix Not Totally Useless | The Scientist Magazine®

Appendix Not Totally Useless | The Scientist Magazine® | Microbe | Scoop.it
The small organ evolved too many times for it to be an accident, but it’s still unclear what it does.
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How The Flu Outsmarted Google

How The Flu Outsmarted Google | Microbe | Scoop.it

Scientific hindsight shows that Google Flu Trends far overstated this year's flu season, raising questions about the accuracy of using a search engine, which Google and the media hyped as an efficient public health tool, to monitor the flu. 

 

Nature's Declan Butler reported today on the huge discrepancy between Google Flu Trend's estimated peak flu levels and data collected by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this winter. 

 


Via Alex Butler, Olivier Delannoy
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PLOS Pathogens: Identification and Manipulation of the Molecular Determinants Influencing Poliovirus Recombination

PLOS Pathogens: Identification and Manipulation of the Molecular Determinants Influencing Poliovirus Recombination | Microbe | Scoop.it

Viral recombination is critical to understanding the evolution of viral groups and impacts vaccine design, but is poorly understood. In the poliovirus vaccine, recombination is one potential mode of failure where vaccine strains recombine to produce a pathogenic product. We combine gene synthesis and deep sequencing to generate a high-resolution recombination map of poliovirus, both as a model RNA virus and a continuing threat that has yet to be eradicated. This map shows that recombination is concentrated into hotspots and suggests that predictable and alterable motifs in the RNA sequence are associated with recombination frequency. We demonstrate the utility of these observations by re-designing a poliovirus strain to recombine more frequently than normal, facilitating future studies on the role of viral recombination during infection. This result suggests that a large-scale redesign of the entire poliovirus genome to dampen recombination may be feasible, with implications for producing safer and more stable live vaccines.

 


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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 8, 2013 1:47 PM

And people are worried about engineering H5N1 viruses??  I'm more scared of polio....

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Microbes in Pipes: The Microbiology of the Water Distribution System

Microbes in Pipes: The Microbiology of the Water Distribution System | Microbe | Scoop.it
Welcome to the American Academy of Microbiology
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Small Things Considered: Domestic Just for the Sake of it – The Evolution of a Fungus with Good Taste

Small Things Considered: Domestic Just for the Sake of it – The Evolution of a Fungus with Good Taste | Microbe | Scoop.it
We know quite a bit about how the wild aurochs or their ilk evolved into tame, bossy cows and how the insignificant grass teosinte became nutritious maize, but what do we know about the evolution of microbes involved in food and drink production?
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Synthetic corkscrew peptide kills antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria

Synthetic corkscrew peptide kills antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria | Microbe | Scoop.it
An engineered peptide provides a new prototype for killing an entire category of resistant bacteria by shredding and dissolving their double-layered membranes, which are thought to protect those microbes from antibiotics.
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Twitter / acuestamd: Yep. #AntibioticsResistance ...

Yep. #AntibioticsResistance going all the way up... this is one of the reasons #cold #antibioticos #resfriado http://t.co/GF8wvEP9
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Protein structure using viruses and ice

Protein structure using viruses and ice | Microbe | Scoop.it
Protein production: Going viral [Via Eureka! Science News - Popular science news] A research team of scientists from EMBL Grenoble and the IGBMC in Strasbourg, France, have, for the first time, des...

Via Chris Upton + helpers
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The ISME Journal - An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice

The ISME Journal - An opportunistic pathogen isolated from the gut of an obese human causes obesity in germfree mice | Microbe | Scoop.it
The ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology is the official Journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology, publishing high-quality, original research papers, short communications, commentary articles and reviews in...
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Un grupo de investiagción en China ha asociado la obesidad con un sobrecrecimiento de enterobacterias en el intestino

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Syndemic Microbiology Game

Syndemic Microbiology Game | Microbe | Scoop.it
View the Indie DB Syndemic Game video Cinematic Gameplay Trailer

Otro juego de microbiología, aunque aun en desarrollo. En este caso, tomamos el papel de un microrganismo simbionte que ayuda al sistema inmune del organismo a luchar contra una infección. Estas pueden variar, pudiendo ser bacterianas, víricas, fúngicas...y además, muchos de los microrganismos que las causan están basados en la vida real. Un shooter con unos escenarios muy trabajados, mezclado con algo de estrategía y un sistema de mejoras y armas que promete bastante!


Las páginas del juego donde podeis ver un trailer:
http://www.indiedb.com/games/syndemic/videos/cinematic-gameplay-trailer
http://www.facebook.com/SyndemicGame

Y por si os interesa financiar este proyecto:
http://www.indiegogo.com/syndemic
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Andrés Gtz.'s curator insight, December 19, 2012 11:52 AM

Para cuando terminemos los examenes...