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Search marketing: Six tips for mobile search success #mobilesearch

Search marketing: Six tips for mobile search success #mobilesearch | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Mobile search has grown 500 per cent in the past two years, with 95 per cent of smartphone users searching for information regularly. Among the advantages of mobile search for brands is building location data into search results, providing the possibility for more targeted recommendations (in the case of retailers/branded apps, for example). But what are the key recommendations for mobile search success?

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
Sam Stern's insight:

mHealth companies are by definition, MOBILE.  Why then do so few have a mobile strategy?  This is excellent content to start building your #mHealth strategy.

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mHealth marketing
mHealth trends, activities and insights
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Drive mHealth Sales with Social Media

Drive mHealth Sales with Social Media | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Does Social Media truly drive  mHealth sales? There seems to be differing opinions about the ROI effectiveness of Social Media. Email Still [...]
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Telehealth startup Doctor on Demand raises $21 million

Telehealth startup Doctor on Demand raises $21 million | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Telehealth startup Doctor on Demand has raised $21 million in its latest round of funding, the company announced Wednesday. The service allows customers to see board-certified physicians through a video visit, at $40 per consultation.
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Big Data Could Bring Your Credit Card History to Your Doctor

Big Data Could Bring Your Credit Card History to Your Doctor | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Carolinas, which covers as many as 900 medical centers in North and South Carolina, has been using an algorithm that takes into account the consumer data of over 2 million people and identifies patients who could be high risk – based on their...
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WHY Is Telling mHealth Stories Too Hard?

WHY Is Telling mHealth Stories Too Hard? | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
After over two years of talking with and working with dozens of mHealth, Digital Health, and Health IT firms, THIS [...]
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mHealth Story Strategy: Does It Connect to Your WHY?

mHealth Story Strategy: Does It Connect to Your WHY? | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
What’s your Story? What’s your Story Strategy? What’s your WHY? Imagine you’re across the table from a Venture Capital firm… [...]
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Why Your Health IT Firm Needs “Cornerstone” Content

Why Your Health IT Firm Needs “Cornerstone” Content | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Follow these 5 strategies to earn Google love from your Health IT Cornerstone Content.
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How to Write The Perfect Linkedin mHealth Update

How to Write The Perfect Linkedin mHealth Update | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
To engage your buyer personas and Ideal Future Clients on Linkedin, you need an active Linkedin Company Page. When you [...]
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Apple’s Healthkit: The Obvious Need to Merge Marketing with mHealth Apps

Apple’s Healthkit: The Obvious Need to Merge Marketing with mHealth Apps | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Apple is listening. If any company is a leader in Re-Imagining, it’s Apple. Apple has Re-Imagined the music business. The iPhone [...]
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Health Care Content Marketing Inspires with Powerful Storytelling - The Content Standard by Skyword (blog)

Health Care Content Marketing Inspires with Powerful Storytelling - The Content Standard by Skyword (blog) | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Health Care Content Marketing Inspires with Powerful Storytelling
The Content Standard by Skyword (blog)
Skyword had the pleasure of sponsoring the second Content Marketing for Life Sciences event last week, organized by ExL Pharma.
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Amazon's Fire Phone might be a boon for health apps

Amazon's Fire Phone might be a boon for health apps | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
It's easy to imagine your doctor staring out from the screen of your phone, talking to you as he reads the objective data being gathered by the sensors moving over your body.
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Story Strategy: Why Telling Stories Is Marketing Gold

Story Strategy: Why Telling Stories Is Marketing Gold | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
 One of the most powerful stories illustrating the secret of personal and business accomplishment is Acres of Diamonds. Russell Conwell, [...]
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Story Strategy: Why Telling Stories Is Marketing Gold

Story Strategy: Why Telling Stories Is Marketing Gold | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
 One of the most powerful stories illustrating the secret of personal and business accomplishment is Acres of Diamonds. Russell Conwell, [...]
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The Science of Storytelling | SocialTimes

The Science of Storytelling | SocialTimes | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it

The chemical and psychological makeup of our minds affects how we consume content: Our brains are wired to connect with compelling stories.


Brand storytelling tactics focus on different functions of the brain related to understanding and perception. The brain processes images 60 times faster than text, and 92 percent of consumers want brands to create stories around ads. Because of this, marketers should be delivering linear content with clear narratives and using images to tell their stories.


OneSpot has put together the following infographic to demonstrate how storytelling affects the brain and how brands can cut through the noise to offer stories that resonate with readers....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Kavita Sahgal's curator insight, June 10, 12:13 AM

The why behind the impact of Story Telling..

Beri Creative's curator insight, June 10, 12:22 AM

We LOVE this! We're all aware of how much us humans are drawn to stories - this just puts it into perspective.

Moons Lucien's curator insight, June 13, 12:59 AM

Would preffered to be storyselling or picth featured selling when you meet a saleman or you will meet a customer? think two minutes?

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How to Use PR to Boost mHealth Content Marketing

How to Use PR to Boost mHealth Content Marketing | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
If you want to grab more attention and get more bang for your buck on your Content Marketing investment, add [...]
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Patients Are Hungry for Information: Does Your mHealth Solution Deliver?

Patients Are Hungry for Information: Does Your mHealth Solution Deliver? | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
What conversations are health care organizations… clients for your enterprise health IT solutions… having with patients (potential end user mHealth app users)? [...]
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The Future of Programmatic Media Buying

The Future of Programmatic Media Buying | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
By Nicholas Galante
Media buying has evolved tremendously in the past few years with the increased utilization of programmatic media buying systems.
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Healthcare’s digital future | McKinsey & Company

Healthcare’s digital future | McKinsey & Company | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it

by McKinsey; See also Insights by Gary Monk at MobiHealth here

 

A McKinsey & Company article: Insights from our international survey can help healthcare organizations plan their next moves in the journey toward full digitization. 

The adoption of IT in HealthCare systems has, in general followed the same pattern as other industries. [ ..]
As for its effects on the healthcare sector, this second wave of IT adoption helped bring about, for example, the electronic health card in Germany. It was also a catalyst for the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act in the United States—an effort to promote the adoption of health-information technology—and the National Programme for IT in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Regardless of their immediate impact, these programs helped create an important and powerful infrastructure that certainly will be useful in the future.

Many institutions in the private and public sector have already moved to the third wave of IT adoption—full digitization of their entire enterprise, including digital products, channels, and processes, as well as advanced analytics that enable entirely new operating models. No longer limited to helping organizations do a certain task better or more efficiently, digital technology has the potential to affect every aspect of business and private life, enabling smarter choices, allowing people to spend more time on tasks they deem valuable, and often fundamentally transforming the way value is created. What will this third wave of IT adoption look like for healthcare?

Players in the healthcare industry were relatively successful at—and benefited from—the first and second waves of IT adoption. But they struggled to successfully manage the myriad stakeholders, regulations, and privacy concerns required to build a fully integrated healthcare IT system. This is partly because the first and second wave of IT adoption focused more on processes and less on patient needs. Still, programs like the N3 communication network in the United Kingdom and the secure telematics platform in Germany have created powerful infrastructures that have the potential to support the third wave of digital services in healthcare—but only if stakeholders take the appropriate next steps.

 

Now that patients around the world have grown more comfortable using digital networks and services, even for complex and sensitive issues such as healthcare (successful websites DrEd, PatientsLikeMe, and ZocDoc are just three examples of this trend), we believe the time has come for healthcare systems, payors, and providers to go “all in” on their digital strategies. The question is, where should they start?

 

[...] Success in the third wave of digital depends very much on first understanding patients’ digital preferences in both channel and service. But many digital healthcare strategies are still driven by myths or information that is no longer true. We interviewed thousands of patients from different age groups, countries, genders, and incomes; respondents had varying levels of digital savvy. Our research revealed surprising and actionable insights about what patients really want, which can in turn inform how healthcare organizations begin their digital patient-enablement journey. Here, we present five of those insights.

Myth 1: People don’t want to use digital services for healthcare

Many healthcare executives believe that, due to the sensitive nature of medical care, patients don’t want to use digital services except in a few specific situations; [..] . In fact, the results of our survey reveal something quite different. The reason patients are slow to adopt digital healthcare is primarily because existing services don’t meet their needs or because they are of poor quality. [..] 1 more than 75 percent of respondents would like to use digital healthcare services, as long as those services meet their needs and provide the level of quality they expect (Exhibit 1).[..] Of course, nondigital channels will continue to be relevant and important, so digital channels will have to be embedded in a well-thought-through multichannel concept.

 

Myth 2: Only young people want to use digital services

[..] however, that patients from all age groups are more than willing to use digital services for healthcare (Exhibit 2). In fact, older patients (those over 50) want digital healthcare services nearly as much as their younger counterparts. More than 70 percent of all older patients [..] A recent report from the European Union2 suggests that service type—not just channel—should be segmented by age; [..]

Myth 3: Mobile health is the game changer

[..] our survey shows that demand for mobile healthcare is not universal. It is therefore not the single critical factor in the future of healthcare digitization [..]

 

Myth 4: Patients want innovative features and apps

[..] But the core features patients expect from their health system are surprisingly mundane: efficiency, better access to information, integration with other channels, and the availability of a real person if the digital service doesn’t give them what they need. [..]

 

Myth 5: A comprehensive platform of service offerings is a prerequisite for creating value

 

When going digital, many institutions—not only those in healthcare—think it is necessary to “go big” before they can achieve anything; they believe they must build a comprehensive platform with offerings along the entire spectrum of customer services. But our survey finds that it can be smarter to start small and act fast (Exhibit 4). [..] Surprisingly, across the globe, most people want the same thing: assistance with routine tasks and navigating the often-complex healthcare system.[..]patients most often cite “finding and scheduling physician appointments"[..] selecting the right specialist and support for repetitive administrative tasks such as prescription refills. What most of these services have in common is that they do not require massive IT investments to get started.

The third wave of digitization in healthcare: Getting started

Three steps can help healthcare companies begin their journey toward the third wave of digitization.
The first step is to understand what it is that patients really want and the best way to give it to them. [..]
Next, organizations should segment their services according to basic criteria such as the amount of investment required, estimated patient demand, and value created through the service.[..]
And finally, just like organizations in other industries, healthcare companies should continually add new services to keep patient attention and build value. Once patients are familiar with the general idea of digital-service provision, organizations can begin offering more complex, high-value services, such as integrated-care companion apps or mobile health records....


Via rob halkes, Michael Seres
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rob halkes's curator insight, July 16, 4:11 AM

Great Survey results, aligning with what experts already thought. Results generated by Germany, Singapore and the UK, but believed to be representative of patients in these advanced markets (!).

Results tell us this:

  • Age of patients does not influence the desire to find health services on line - the differences between age groups regard preferences for channels and for content: in any case directly related with the very health condition of the patient;
  • Current, initial expectations of patients regard convenience services first, like ability to make appointments on line and service with prescription refills - but there's indication that expectations will rise with accustomed use of available offerings;
  • This means that a developmental process of creating and rendering services allows for both the health care organization and its patients to grow into more complicated patterns of digital services. It also makes way for gradual implementation of the very development. So each organization may create its own path in digital development, internally and with external digital service delivery;
  • It implies that there is no dominance as in "need-to-have" of specific digital services  - no organization needs to jump to hypes, as they perceive them, but the very need is to do and take your own roadmap with digital;
  • Even stronger, the roadmap to digital is better guided with the concept of eHealth, that in fact entails every aspect of digital service provision in health care, from a facilitative level of making appointments, through information support, health records, wearables and monitoring, up to interaction, data exchange and communication. The authors acknowledge that there is no one concept needed of a one comprehensive platform (myth 5);
  • So one's development into one's own configuration is the best way to move forward. But, indeed there are two conditions:
    - it better be well thought off: early steps may generate but also limit consecutive steps, so a general design of one's view on eHealth will be helpful, and
    - each patients does prefer his or her own selection and (developmental) way into further uses. This implies that the very digital platform needs to allow for such. That strengthens the need to apply experience-co-creation methods of development.   

In short: we know where to move, we know how to create it, let's go for it.
Get in contact here



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#008- Digital Health Marketing- Branding and Positioning Action Plan

#008- Digital Health Marketing- Branding and Positioning Action Plan | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
To compete in a crowded, noisy marketplace today, you must first do your homework to create a smart strategy. We [...]
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Tap the Power of Storytelling in mHealth Marketing

Tap the Power of Storytelling in mHealth Marketing | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
You… only YOU… can tell the story of your business and why you do what you do. In a crowded, [...]
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The Fight for Clients: Story Strategy for Health IT Firms

The Fight for Clients: Story Strategy for Health IT Firms | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Discover the 5 steps to telling your power-packed Health IT marketing Story that CONNECTS with prospects and wins clients.
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4 Easy Rules for Using Numbers in Titles

4 Easy Rules for Using Numbers in Titles | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Blog post titles with numbers bring in as much as eight times the traffic as posts without one.
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Internet Trends for mHealth Marketers

Internet Trends for mHealth Marketers | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
If you’re over 40 years old, you probably remember the iconic E.F. Hutton ads: “When E.F.Hutton talks, people listen.” Today, [...]
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Launch Great Marketing: Client Insight Mapping for Digital Health

Launch Great Marketing: Client Insight Mapping for Digital Health | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
If your desire is great marketing that delivers Ideal Profitable Clients to your Digital Health business,… It starts with a [...]
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A Social Media Marketing Strategy That Isn’t Focused On “Creating Compelling Content”

A Social Media Marketing Strategy That Isn’t Focused On “Creating Compelling Content” | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
Tweet Tweet Most conversation about social media strategy sucks. Write compelling headlines, use interesting photos, follow “influencers” Pfffft…. what a crock of shit. I’m going to blow the doors wide open on why most social media marketing strategies are garbage & why even the halfway decent ones still aren’t nearly as effective as they could(...)

Via Walt Goshert
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Is Your Health IT Business a “Star”?

Is Your Health IT Business a “Star”? | mHealth marketing | Scoop.it
“Star” businesses, according to Richard Koch in The Star Principle, are start-up companies that operate in high-growth areas and quickly [...]
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