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Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed?

Will Any Health App Ever Really Succeed? | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

There are wildly successful apps for mapping, sending e-mail, and catapulting birds. Why aren’t there any for health care?

 

Geoffrey Clapp thinks a mobile app can make health care better—so much so, in fact, that his upcoming app is called just that: Better.

 

The app is being tested at the Mayo Clinic, which is an investor in Clapp’s startup, and is slated to launch in October. It aims to let people use a smartphone to reach a doctor, find a diagnosis, or keep track of their medical records. Storing personal medical data and using health-tracking features will be free, but users will be charged monthly fees for instant access to nurses and health coaches.

 

Better, also the name of the company, is among a slew of health and fitness companies concentrating on the mobile Internet market. So far, however, health apps have failed to take off. To the disappointment of “e-health” advocates who hope to see such apps transform the medical landscape, the number of Americans using technology to track their health or fitness didn’t change between 2010 and early 2013, according to data from the Pew Internet & American Life Project.

 
Via nrip
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

not until they realise its not about cool apps but good health, and that is a personal behavioral change!

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Ken Nelson's curator insight, September 26, 2013 12:21 PM

What a great idea, not before time something like this could be a life saver,and how many times do you get asked the same questions about your  health & what you are alergy to, would be great to store all this info on your phone securely of course.

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8 Digital Health Startup And Investment Trends We’re Watching In 2016

8 Digital Health Startup And Investment Trends We’re Watching In 2016 | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
Funding will shift overseas, corporate activity and partnerships will increase, and more trends looking forward in 2016.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

And here is the contrary viewpoint...! As always, debate stimulates opinion and informed decision making. #DigitalHealth is here to stay!

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Diets and Data: Counting More Than Just Calories

Diets and Data: Counting More Than Just Calories | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

Healthcare technology is reinventing how we treat obesity and other chronic diseases.

Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Lifestyle diseases are just that - a sickness and a malaise that can be treated. With lifestyle changes of course and a bit of coaching and informed decision making. 

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Healthcare Predictions For 2015

Healthcare Predictions For 2015 | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

Next year will be big for healthcare. We felt small tremors in 2014 of the seismic changes underway. In 2015, I predict five changes to the core of the U.S. healthcare system: insurance, pharmaceuticals, supplies, medical services and payments. Let’s take a look at each of these trends, what they mean for the healthcare sector, and what they mean for you.

Walmart becomes your healthcare insurer

This October, Walmart tipped its hand by launching a healthcare insurance exchange online. However, the insurance products currently sold on its exchange do not have Walmart as the carrier, which will change in 2015.

Walmart’s public announcements thus far provide a clear preview of the insurance plan’s future design. Primary care through retail clinics and $4 generic drugs at the pharmacy will drive traffic into stores. For specialty care, the plan will leverage the Centers of Excellence program that Walmart already offers to its 1.2 million insured employees. In this program, consumers pay little to nothing out-of-pocket for knee, hip surgery, and cancer treatment if they go to a short list of high-quality medical centers like Mayo, the Cleveland Clinic, Mercy and Geisinger.

With a store within five miles of 95 percent of all Americans and retail transactional data from its consumers, Walmart can provided tailored population health services and incentivize healthier shopping decisions to prevent diabetes and heart disease.

Startups sell into big pharma and become profitable

Despite a 5x increase in venture investments, most digital health companies are not profitable.  Digital health CEOs should look at pharma as its paying customer. Despite their vast differences, pharmaceutical manufacturers are starting to pay tech startups to solve their complicated problems.

One major issue pharma wants your help with is accessing and selling to physicians. In person detailing by trained sales representatives has been the core of pharma’s sale strategy for decades.

Yet, one-fourth of all MD’s offices and two-fifths of all offices with 10 or more MDs refuse to see pharmaceutical sales reps in their offices. The Sunshine Act, which compelled every pharma company to disclose what it spends on each MD, accelerated the problem. The problem of customer awareness and engagement is ripe for tech companies, particularly those focused on social media, mobile advertising and video, to capitalize on.

Next year is going to be a tipping point, because spending and hiring within pharma’s commercial organizations are changing fast. Plus, the FDA published draft guidance on social media in July 2014. Suddenly, these corporations have large eMarketing teams and VPs of digital health. We are seeing CIOs from companies like Dell working at Merck. These indicators tell me that 2015 will be the year when pharma is willing to shop for best-in-breed companies that address their business problems.

Amazon undercuts the medical supply chain

Amazon sells a dizzying array of products. Catheters and surgical gloves are not on the market yet, but they will be soon. Doctors and practice managers are just like the rest of us — they love Amazon Prime for their homes, so why not for their practices?

Amazon will first target small practices and cutout group-purchasing organizations that take an undeserved cut of savings that could be passed on to physicians. If Amazon can ship you toilet paper in two hours, it can supply a small practice with gloves and gowns. The volume from these accounts will justify free shipping, especially when Amazon moves upstream into higher-margin products such as sutures, syringes and other commoditized supplies.

 

While medical professionals and business managers will be driven by price and convenience, Amazon’s motivations will be financial. General surgical supply company Owens & Minor generated $9 billion in annual revenue last year. Amazon isn’t known for letting glaring business opportunities go untouched, especially those that can move its stock price.

Hospitals become a channel for peer-to-peer lending

If you understand the flow of payments in healthcare, you can predict the trends. Consumers and employers are purchasing insurance plans with high deductibles. As a result, the first dollar that hospitals earn is now coming from consumers. Actually, the first $17,000 is coming from consumers. With an average income of $55,000, most American consumers simply can’t pay their medical bills.

When they don’t pay, it hurts providers financially. What consumers don’t pay shows up as accounts receivable on hospital balance sheets and eventually turns into bad debt. Since many hospitals are financed by debt and their credit worthiness is partially determined by the health of their balance sheet, the problem of getting patients to pay is urgent.

This raises the question — how can we find the money to help consumers finance their health care payments? Many consumers are able and willing to pay their medical bills, they just can’t do it all at once. Peer-to-peer lending companies have paved the way for unsecured structure notes, where an individual’s loan can be financed by others. These have shown impressive growth. Peer-to-peer lending is already being used to finance plastic surgery and other cash-pay procedures. Now it could be used for the majority of medical expenses in the U.S.

Latinos become the most desired healthcare segment in the U.S.

There are 54 million Latinos living in the United States, constituting 17 percent of the population. Politicians have taken notice and are paying attention to Latinos as an important voting demographic. Healthcare providers are beginning to do so, too.

Latinos have been disenfranchised by the U.S. healthcare system because of legal status, English language skills and financial constraints. Fewer than 4 percent of healthcare providers speak Spanish and most do not know how to approach the cultural and economic diversity within the Latino population. Even native English speakers can’t make sense of PPOs vs. HMOs.  As a result, Latinos are 1 out of every 5 uninsured individuals in the U.S. and leverage healthcare services differently than other demographic cohorts

As hospitals compete for volume, they cannot ignore 1 out of 5 Americans. In order to win the loyalty of this untapped customer segment, we will see Latino-branded services with evening and weekend hours to serve dual-income families. Since these services will be built from scratch to provide high-quality care at low prices, they might leap frog the care that the rest of the population currently receives.

Change has historically come slowly and reluctantly to the healthcare industry, but thanks to widespread demand from the government, payers, and consumers for improvement in coverage and care, it seems to be speeding up.

These five predictions represent a power shift in the world of healthcare, where new players emerge as forces to be reckoned with, and consumers gain greater control over their care. I predict, and hope, that 2015 will be the year when leaders across the healthcare spectrum will welcome innovation and embrace much-needed change.


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Wearables in healthcare: Examining the impact on providers and patients

Wearables in healthcare: Examining the impact on providers and patients | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
One of the most promising aspects of new technology in the healthcare industry is the ability to provide better, faster care while engaging patients in their own treatments; to that end, wearables are making a big impact. Read more...
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driven by an increasing desire amidst patients to know more and be well!

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Infographic: The Rise of Wearable Technology

Infographic: The Rise of Wearable Technology | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
From smartwatches to mobile heart monitors, wearable technology is changing our world as we know it. According to the latest projections from ABI Research,
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Infographic: Doctors Prescribing More Mobile Health Apps

Infographic: Doctors Prescribing More Mobile Health Apps | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
According to the most recent industry data available, doctors are beginning to encourage patients to use mobile health apps in numbers that would have been
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Take your digital health pill and make sure you are looked after... 

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Most patients willing to share health data with researchers, employers

Most patients willing to share health data with researchers, employers | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
68 percent of the respondents said they would be OK with sharing health information anonymously
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68 percent of the respondents said they would be OK with sharing health information anonymously

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Your personality could be the cause of your ill health

Your personality could be the cause of your ill health | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
Did you know that your emotions and personality do play an essential role in your health? Yes, according to the study performed at the University of Nottingham in England, your personality may affect your health and well being and longevity.
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Fitness Tracker Fatigue? How to Make Wearable Tech Useful

Fitness Tracker Fatigue? How to Make Wearable Tech Useful | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
The popularity of fitness trackers has exploded, yet few people keep using these devices after a few months. Now, researchers are looking at what key features would it would take to make trackers better.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Been wearing mine for 2 years, but yeah agree with the statement - "lots of data, no analysis"!

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Wearable Technology And Digital Healthcare Strategies Should Shift Focus To Chronic Medical Illness

Wearable Technology And Digital Healthcare Strategies Should Shift Focus To Chronic Medical Illness | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

As we marvel at the gadgets that companies such as Nike, Fitbit, Jawbone and Apple have recently produced and brought to market–gadgets that can record our heart rate, calories expended, and steps taken—one can only think of how this technology could likely be used on a greater scale to help those who truly need it the most: people with chronic medical illnesses such as emphysema, diabetes, or congestive heart failure.

 

A recent article by J.C Herz in Wired Magazine provides an excellent beginning point to do just that: recognizing how we, as a society, have yet to harness such powerful and innovative technology to help millions with chronic medical illnesses.

As things currently stand, which Herz eloquently outlines in her essay, existing companies’ technology in wearables has for the most part been utilized by tech aficionados and athletes who marvel in tracking personal health data—but not ultimately benefiting society at large.

In her article, Herz makes clear references to multiple regulatory stumbling blocks, adding not only cost but logistical nightmares to pushing forward–including HIPAA and the FDA, to mention two big ones. She points out that so many of these nifty and innovative gadgets are often put away, gather dust, and may not outlast the novelty of a 6-month period.

In fact, a report last month by PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Health Research Initiative (HRI) evaluating the state of wearable digital technology and devices further supports our current dilemma: Less than half of people who own a wearable use it on a daily basis.

The report, which surveyed over 1,000 consumers, is sobering to say the least. Based on the report, 21% of people in the US have purchased such a device, with 52% of those persons neglecting to use it on a daily basis. Tucked into this 52% of persons are 10% who have stopped using their device altogether.

As a follow-up, HRI released a more recent report just days ago evaluating how the future paradigm of healthcare needs to catch up to other sectors of our economy to improve not only efficiency but quality of care. Entitled Healthcare delivery of the future: How digital technology can bridge the gap of time and distance between clinicians and consumers, the report provides a compelling argument for a change in how we monitor patients with chronic medical issues in the home setting, along with how patients communicate with their healthcare providers and the healthcare system as a whole.

The take-home of this report is that there is a growing acceptance among physicians, with a more open attitude toward adopting digital technology for their medical practices, with clear suggestions for insurers, healthcare companies, physicians and other stakeholders to explore and develop such technologies to help patients who suffer from chronic illness.

“Digitally enabled care is no longer nice to have, it’s fundamental for delivering high quality care,” said Daniel Garrett, Health Information Technology Practice Leader, PwC US.  “Just as the banking and retail sectors today use data and technology to improve efficiency, raise quality, and expand services, healthcare must either do the same or lose patients to their competitors who do so.”

The HRI survey spoke with over 1,000 industry leaders, physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician’s assistants.

The findings of the report:

1. Put diagnostic testing of basic conditions into the hands of patients:  Close to 42% of physicians are comfortable relying on at-home test results to prescribe medication.

2. Increase patient-clinician interaction:  Half of physicians said that e-visits could replace more than 10% of in-office patient visits, and nearly as many consumers indicated they would communicate with caregivers online.

3. Promote self-management of chronic disease using health apps: 28% of consumers said they have a healthcare, wellness, or medical app on their mobile device, up from 16% last year.  Nearly 66% of physicians would prescribe an app to help patients manage chronic diseases such as diabetes.

4. Help caregivers work more as a team: 79% of physicians and close to 50% of consumers believe using mobile devices can help physicians better coordinate care.

“The adoption and integration of digital technology with existing healthcare processes has not yet fulfilled its potential to transform care and value for patients,” said Simon Samaha, MD, Principal, PwC. “The next five years will be critical, with leaders emerging from those who use digital technology to innovate and revamp the interactions between consumers, providers and payers.”

It’s clear from HRI’s report that major stakeholders in the healthcare industry including hospitals, insurers and the pharmaceutical industry all believe that major changes will occur in how healthcare is delivered. However, several barriers exist in preventing the implementation of this new paradigm of healthcare. These include issues of security, privacy, consumer consent, data-sharing, fragmented workflows and digital buy-in.

HRI’s recommendations for healthcare stakeholders:

1. Generating actionable insights through analytics to yield better outcomes: Analytics allow healthcare providers to tailor unique care plans for patients while also managing care plans and improving patient health. Additional goals of treatment are to identify high-risk populations for focused care.

2. Using increasing amounts of data to rethink the workforce and workflows: Using technology to adjust the workforce, which can reduce costs and improve quality. The end result is to adjust staffing based on advances in technology. Digital technology can be used to ensure physicians are practicing at the top of their licenses and leverage care extenders, such as nurse practitioners, when appropriate.

3. Targeting digital interventions for where they make the most sense: Health systems need to figure out how and where digital technology may replace or augment traditional office visits based on a patient’s medical condition.

Sean MacLeod, President of Seattle-based Stratos, an incubator of healthcare technology for new product innovation takes a similar position with PwC’s report, urging the healthcare industry to make a greater commitment toward caring for an important segment of our population— aging baby boomers and those with chronic medical illness.

“On the wearable side, our market position here [at Stratos] is that this technology is great–Fitbits, mobile EKGs, pedometers, but ‘so what’–the only difference between this and technology 20 years ago is that connectivity and the cloud computing power that’s behind it. You are not getting any other actionable data than you could have acquired as a first user or early adopter from the late 1990s,” said MacLeod.

“We have always taken the approach that these are great enabling technologies and the adoption factor really points that the market is ready for this—but the market space that they are being applied to is somewhat arbitrary,” added MacLeod.

MacLeod asks the question: “Is there actionable data that really affects the healthcare system and the costs that are associated with it?”

“What about the diabetics, what about people with epilepsy, what about those with chronic mental illness? And those without resources that get trapped within the health care reimbursement cycle and don’t get predictive and preventable care on a regular basis that helps them through avoiding a worsening of a chronic disease, but also to allow them to manage the disease with their healthcare professional.”

“The big promise here,” explains MacLeod, “is that by implementing these devices in a meaningful way to truly address chronic or preventative medicine—that will be the way you will likely have a large impact on the cost structures of the system.”

“The way that the system is set up right know, it’s very hard to do an ROI calculation that is meaningful across the board, and as a country and you probably won’t get there unless you end up in a single-payer type of environment,” adds MacLeod.

In his view, “The system still hasn’t broken out of an acute-care type of engagement. As a typical healthcare consumer you see your doc for 15 minutes a year. There isn’t a viable or sustainable paradigm for monitoring and tracking the chronicity of care.”

So, the issue is whether we can implement wearable technology to make a meaningful change in how we approach caring for patients.

“There has been a paradigm shift in the marketplace currently from this acute-care setting to more of a chronic-care setting—but it hasn’t shifted yet to address the continuum of wellness. The ISB (Institute for Systems Biology) program in Seattle takes it further to do predictive medicine in such a way that evaluates leading indicators of decreasing wellness. It enables a physician, stakeholder or individual to take proactive measures to not only address a decrease it wellness, but to course-correct it back to a state of wellness,” said MacLeod.

Most medical technology companies today are also attempting to engage in chronic health management, so as part of that, they are pulling wellness apps and wearable technologies into their portfolios, as their “companion products” to their core business. (This could include a pharmaceutical, pacemaker, or healthcare customer relationship management system.)

“These companies are coming up to speed as how to apply the technologies—but they are not educated in the consumer market so they are bit uncomfortable with the “consumerization of their core competency,” believes MacLeod.

“It’s a slow-moving market, so until the consumers of these actionable data devices actually demand it, there is little likelihood that the system will change because of the lack of momentum due to inertia of payers, reimbursement systems and the cost structure that currently exist.”

There is a movement for comparative data that has been growing and this may be addressed by placing technology that is accessible to patients and medical providers in the home setting.

Readmissions of patients through the emergency department cost the healthcare system billions of dollars per year, so developing technology to monitor variations in parameters of chronic disease states may help reduce US healthcare expenditures. Monitoring blood glucose and changes in oxygen saturation, as well as changes in blood pressure, are simple things which can not only improve outcomes but help to reduce costs.

According to Rich Able, CMO and Founder of X2bio, a company dedicated to sensors for monitoring head injuries, “effectively utilizing wearable technology is the key to helping advance our healthcare system to reach the next level—detection and correction of course-based data, predicated on real-time  evaluation.”

Apple and Google, according to Able and MacLeod, serve as channels to the consumer side, but the innovation he feels needs to come from the medical technology space for long term chronic care or wellness paradigms to be successful, with reimbursement paradigms following close behind.


Helius is an example of a unique technology incubated and refined by Stratos for Proteus Digital Health, based in Redwood City, California. The technology connects patients with their medical providers using novel ingestible sensors powered by the body’s natural compounds. A specialized wearable sensor attached to the body and then connected by Bluetooth technology to a smartphone or tablet can then provide real-time feedback relative to the effects of specific medications (heart rate, activity level). Helius received European regulatory approval (CE Mark) in August of 2010, and FDA market clearance as a medical device for co-ingested applications in July of 2012.

“Proteus has revolutionized a platform that completely digitizes the pharmacological response and compliance schedules in a living being, said MacLeod.  “It foresees the future of healthcare where clinicians, caregivers, and family members are connected to a patients’ well being.”

The end result is that “Proteus brings a positive paradigm shift to the notion of personalized medicine and the ‘Connected Human,’” added MacLeod.

Baby boomers driving a changing healthcare approach

Many believe that encouraging the use of connected devices, such as Proteus, may help decrease re-admissions rates, especially with an aging demographic. The new paradigms for health care of our aging population will have to involve the home-care setting.

Able stresses that “75 million baby boomers taxing on the healthcare system” will make treatment in the home using wireless and wearable technologies imperative.

So what will be the driver that will finally push technology into the home, making other approaches suboptimal?

“It’s a realization that the cost structures of today will ultimately bankrupt us as families, or us as a community, or us as a country,” according to MacLeod. “How many years in a row can you put up with double digit increases in your healthcare costs?”

If cities could embrace such technology, potentially in pilot programs to actually demonstrate economic advantages to an integrated system using wearables in a “connected home”, which then translate into improvements in prosperity, reduced cost of living, improved lifestyle and wellness, it is feasible that insurers and other stakeholders would take notice.

A National Initiative to Change How We Manage Chronic Disease?

An initiative from the White House might be the best way to approach integrating wearable technology and digital health to make the connected home the new paradigm to manage people in the outpatient setting.

Just as the electronic health record (EHR) became a national priority, so too should mobile and wearable technology invested in chronic medical care in the home setting become a top priority on the nation’s agenda.

“This is a point of national pride that we should do this,” urges MacLeod. “Lets create a brand new industry and own it.”

MacLeod sums it up another way: “This is the new moonshot for 2016. We will not only will put a man on the moon, but we will bring him back.”

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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Kevin Ellen's curator insight, December 3, 2014 1:58 PM

As more people adopt mobile wearable technology, the need for real time data and responsive services grows.

mawesys.com's curator insight, December 11, 2014 9:42 PM

i wonder where all this is headed

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Why Digital Marketing Has Become the Health-Care Industry's Rx for Revenue

Why Digital Marketing Has Become the Health-Care Industry's Rx for Revenue | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
As profit-pinched hospitals look for cost-effective means to draw in business, they are marketing where the patients are -- online and on mobile devices.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Search is key and healthcare is social! Thats the truth - deal with it.

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Discover Your Spark: The evolution of organisational performance and workplace wellness interventions

Discover Your Spark: The evolution of organisational performance and workplace wellness interventions | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
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Table manners set to change as digital health market evolves

Table manners set to change as digital health market evolves | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
Healthcare
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Funding tightening, appetite shrinking but need growing! Sounds a bit like digital starvation to me! :-) A toast to the future with hope...

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'Nobody could do anything': Chronic shortage of youth psychiatrists persists

'Nobody could do anything': Chronic shortage of youth psychiatrists persists | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

An estimated one million Canadian children have experienced mental health disorders that make it difficult for them to function, but research shows that fewer than 25 per cent will receive proper treatment.

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IoT moving into home healthcare | mHealthNews

IoT moving into home healthcare | mHealthNews | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
Samsung's new system-on-a-chip could spur development of smart devices and broaden connectivity in the rapidly developing home health market.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

Only the disconnected die young!

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Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health

Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
There are many reasons why the digital technologies hope to improve patient care as well as the state of healthcare itself. They include improving efficiencies, patient safety, and cost. We selecte...

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Wearables must align to consumer needs for longtime adoption

Wearables must align to consumer needs for longtime adoption | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
New research from Parks Associates reveals 5 percent of U.S. broadband households are home to a smartwatch providing health and fitness tracking features, and 8 percent of households are using a digital fitness activity tracker such as a pedometer.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

So if we need to beat the bleed off rate that wearers discard within 3 months, we need to pay heed!

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2014 digital health investment exceeded total of three previous years combined, Rock Health says

2014 digital health investment exceeded total of three previous years combined, Rock Health says | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
KPCB, Khosla Ventures, Sequoia, Andreessen Horowitz, First Round, and Venrock were the biggest investors in the health care space in 2014.
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

4.1B$ in 2014 in digital health and we are still questioning business models? Well, there are certainly a bunch of believers out there ; become one!

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Infographic: The Rise of Wearable Technology

Infographic: The Rise of Wearable Technology | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
From smartwatches to mobile heart monitors, wearable technology is changing our world as we know it. According to the latest projections from ABI Research,
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

I am wearing 2!

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mHealth Summit 2014: Providers must invite patients to use mobile tools

mHealth Summit 2014: Providers must invite patients to use mobile tools | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
To get patients to embrace mobile healthcare tools, providers must invite them in, according to panelists speaking at Tuesday morning's FierceMobileHealthcare Breakfast at the mHealth Summit at National Harbor near the District of Columbia.
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"Engagement and adoption is tied to a personal invitation from someone you trust in the healthcare system," he said.

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Tanzania’s Safe Motherhood Text Messaging Service enters third year

Tanzania’s Safe Motherhood Text Messaging Service enters third year | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
Since its launch two years ago, 500,000 men and women accumulatively received 40 million informative safe motherhood messages and reminders through the Wazazi Nipendeni SMS service.
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Tom Rath: How Small Changes Make All The Difference In Your Life

Tom Rath: How Small Changes Make All The Difference In Your Life | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it

To find out more about wellness at work and how to live a healthy lifestyle, I spoke to Tom Rath, who is the author of the new  book "Eat Move Sleep: How Small Choices Lead to Big Changes."


Via Barb Jemmott
Connected Digital Health & Life's insight:

The 3 pillars of good living remain intact - eat and sleep well and get active.

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8 hospital actions for stronger patient engagement

8 hospital actions for stronger patient engagement | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
As healthcare shifts toward value-based care, patient engagement, experience and satisfaction are more important than ever as consumers seek to become a bigger part of their own care.
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Get the patient and his family involved. They want to anyway, dont shut them out because they wont understand. Instead bring them in and use them best!

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Teleconsultations

Teleconsultations | mHealth & Digital Health | Scoop.it
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And Telemedicine makes it presence felt in the UAE, and that too supported by the largest payor. Great news

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