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Janssen Healthcare Innovation Launches Care4Today(TM) Mobile Health Manager 2.0

Janssen Healthcare Innovation Launches Care4Today(TM) Mobile Health Manager 2.0 | MHealth | Scoop.it
Free two-way secure messaging platform, mobile app and website introduces new Care4Charity™ and Care4Family™ features to motivate users to take medications on schedule and support caregivers (RT @JNJCares: Janssen Healthcare Innovation unveils new...
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Harnessing the cloud of patient experience: using social media to detect poor quality healthcare


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The Case for Social Media in Professionalism

Slides for my August 19, 2014 presentation at the #TTHC2014 CME conference at Mayo Clinic - "Sustaining Trust in a Technology-Driven Health Care World"

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AstraZeneca, Exco InTouch launch mobile-enabled COPD program

AstraZeneca, Exco InTouch launch mobile-enabled COPD program | MHealth | Scoop.it

A little over a year after completing a pilot study, pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and Exco InTouch have launched a mobile-enabled program in the UK to help patients manage their chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), called Me&MyCOPD.

The program has three components — a portal in which patients can connect with providers, a server on which information is saved and messages are schedules, and an app that the patient can use. Patients can use the program to track their condition, add data from medical devices, manage clinic visits, and view information on how to deal with different lifestyle issues.

“Me&MyCOPD will help patients to better control their condition and healthcare providers to make more informed decisions, tailoring care pathways to each patient’s individual needs,” Exco InTouch Director of Product Strategy Mark Brincat said in a statement. “This translates into improving patient welfare and their quality of life by reducing the number of unplanned hospital admissions and the frequency and severity of exacerbations, decreasing the overall treatment costs at the same time.”


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Helen Adams's curator insight, June 18, 2014 4:25 AM

I'll be interested to see how this pans out considering the demographic its aimed at.

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A smart shirt that tracks your health and will recharge during washing

A smart shirt that tracks your health and will recharge during washing | MHealth | Scoop.it

French company Cityzen Sciences won the CES 2014 Inclusive Innovation in Everyday Health award for the development of a smart-sensing fabric woven with integral micro-sensors that read body heat, respiration rate, heart rate, and motion through location via GPS.

 

The fabric combines sensors, fabric, distributed computation, and small battery-powered transmitter into a unit that links in real time to a smartphone.

 

Apparently, they're also working on a recharging system for the fabric that will receive most of its energy when the clothing is washed. Until it's implemented, you'll have to set the spin cycle to 24 hours*


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Art Jones's curator insight, February 6, 2014 10:59 AM

AmazingTech

DigitalMumsHQ's curator insight, February 7, 2014 4:08 AM

A  tee-shirt that tracks your health! Now thats clever

Sandy Spencer's curator insight, February 7, 2014 8:12 AM

Now this is interesting...not that I'd wear one. But very interesting! Would you wear a shirt that was wired for your health?

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Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world

Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world | MHealth | Scoop.it

Today we’re accustomed to going on the Internet to visit websites, send e-mails, shop online, run mobile apps, and even get up to the second and down to the inches directions from satellites orbiting the earth. We’re seeing medical devices and related hardware moving faster towards the same kinds of consumerization, their sensors switching from analog to digital native, becoming more mobile, and perhaps most importantly, becoming part of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) by generating enormous amounts of coveted clinical data.

 

What’s going to be even more spectacular is that you’ll soon be wearing smart watches that can know your vital signs, electronic “bandaids” that can sense whether wounds are healing, and many other personal medical devices that continuously monitor things going on within and around your body. These kinds of devices will make up what will soon become the “Medical Internet of Things” (mIOT). mIOT devices will generate significant amounts of data and managing this data becomes what’s known as a “big data” problem. The reason is obvious – data flowing continuously from your body comes in rapid velocity, large volumes, and many different kinds of variety.

 

As we create and upgrade future devices, our designers must realize that they’re no longer just making standalone devices, they’re likely crafting a system component that fits into a larger system of systems ecosystem that is creating and moving around enormous amounts of coveted data. Coveted because that data can be used to improve diagnostics, tailor clinical workflows, improve patient safety, and advance care coordination. All of these kinds of tasks and the data that will make them possible become even more important as payment models move from FFS to outcomes-driven.

 

Read more: http://medcitynews.com/2014/02/keeping-medical-device-designs-relevant-big-data-world-slideshow/#ixzz2tf5cOHMI


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Top Physician Information Sources by Mobile Device

Top Physician Information Sources by Mobile Device | MHealth | Scoop.it

The infographic above illustrates the top physician information sources by frequency of mobile device usage on smartphones/tablets. 

 

source: http://hitconsultant.net/2014/02/20/infographic-top-physician-information-sources-mobile-device/

 


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Antoine POIGNANT, MD's curator insight, March 27, 2014 7:16 PM

The infographic above illustrates the top physician information sources by frequency of mobile device usage on smartphones/tablets. 

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Project ranks billions of drug interactions

Project ranks billions of drug interactions | MHealth | Scoop.it

For decades, drug development was mostly a game of trial and error, with brute-force candidate screens throwing up millions more duds than winners. Researchers are now using computers to get a head start. By analysing the chemical structure of a drug, they can see if it is likely to bind to, or ‘dock’ with, a biological target such as a protein. Such algorithms are particularly useful for finding potentially toxic side effects that may come from unintended dockings to structurally similar, but untargeted, proteins.

 

Last week, researchers presented a computational effort that assesses billions of potential dockings on the basis of drug and protein information held in public databases. The result, a website called Drugable (drugable.com) that is backed by the US National Library of Medicine (NLM), is still in testing, but it will eventually be available for free, allowing researchers to predict how and where a compound might work in the body, purely on the basis of chemical structure


more at original : http://www.nature.com/news/project-ranks-billions-of-drug-interactions-1.14245


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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:15 PM

The website, containing all this informatio,is called Drugable (drugable.com), and is backed by the US National Library of Medicine It is still in testing, but it will eventually be available for free. 

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Healthcare.gov: What The Federal Government Could Learn From Health IT Startups | HIStalk Connect

Healthcare.gov: What The Federal Government Could Learn From Health IT Startups | HIStalk Connect | MHealth | Scoop.it
Government officials are answering to charges that the glitch-ridden healthcare.gov federal health insurance exchange website cost $634 million in taxpayer

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India’s Secret to Low-Cost Health Care

India’s Secret to Low-Cost Health Care | MHealth | Scoop.it
A renowned Indian heart surgeon is currently building a 2,000-bed, internationally accredited “health city” in the Cayman Islands, a short flight from the U.S.

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Mhealth to be a Pfizer priority

For more Mobile Commerce news related articles.The pharmaceutical industry giant is now calling for a focus on the mobile health sector.

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New app helps patients with Crohn’s disease

New app helps patients with Crohn’s disease | MHealth | Scoop.it
In order to help patients manage their condition more easily, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) has developed an app that patients can use to track their health.

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Allison Emma Schizkoske's curator insight, November 22, 2013 3:49 PM

To have an app to be able to connect with doctors is amazing. If you have a question and dont feel like waiting for hours to see a doctor you can get an answer quickly. This is also great so you can track what you have ate to see what food makes you react. 

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Mhealth startup deepens patient literacy app experience for medical professionals - MedCity News

Mhealth startup deepens patient literacy app experience for medical professionals - MedCity News | MHealth | Scoop.it
Mhealth startup deepens patient literacy app experience for medical professionals MedCity News Photo 166 When Orca Health CEO Matt Berry set out to develop apps to improve health literacy, he saw them as a useful tool to stimulate interactions...
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How do I turn my idea into a health app (and 10 things you might not…

Presented at MCHIEC event Healthcare Apps - Maximising Impact on 1 Feb 2013 http://www.mchiec.org.uk/events/details/healthcare-apps-maximising-impact

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PatientView's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:13 PM

Guide to health app regulation 

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Vida app manages chronic conditions

Vida app manages chronic conditions | MHealth | Scoop.it
Healthcare startup Vida is an enterprise care platform integrating coaches, videoconferencing, messaging, and charting data from wearables.

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Marc Phippen's curator insight, February 2, 2015 4:18 AM

Vida, which offers 24/7 care in a one-on-one or team-based model, helps users manage their chronic conditions with the help of health coaches for conditions like obesity, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. The app essentially combines features like those of Yelp to match a user with health coaches, Skype videoconferencing and instant messaging with coaches, and charting blood pressure and weight with Apple HealthKit and wearable device integration.

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How mobile became mighty in healthcare

How mobile became mighty in healthcare | MHealth | Scoop.it
Without a doubt, 2014 will be declared the year mobile became mighty in healthcare. No matter where in the world you live, whether you are talking about patients, consumers, or healthcare providers, mobile is revolutionising the future of healthcare – so much so, that it's worth taking a closer look at 10 powerful trends emerging throughout the mobile health space. We'll also be showcasing our findings on mobile health user experience at the Mighty Mobile seminar at the inauguralCannes Lions Health festival.

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5 ways mobile is improving health care outcomes

5 ways mobile is improving health care outcomes | MHealth | Scoop.it

Here is a statistic every health care communicator should know: 99 percent of text messages are read.

Translation: If you don’t have a mobile strategy for 2014, you’re missing out. A text message won’t get lost in the sea of posts, tweets, or emails you send to patients.

“Every phone has SMS on it,” says Sam McKelvie, Head of Mobile Strategy at Mobile Commons. “Texting goes across all demographics, age, race, and socio-economic statuses.”

A mobile strategy can help you gather more data about your patients.

“As a health care communicator, you can get so much data from the people participating in mobile campaigns,” McKelvie says. “Gone are the days of long-term follow-up interviews and phone surveys. People are willing to respond back and forth by text.”

Mobile Commons shares five examples of how mobile is changing health care:

Helping smokers quit

Mobile Commons teamed up with The National Cancer Institute to help teens stop smoking. So far, with SmokefreeTXT, the quitting rate averages around 6 percent for teens who opted-in to receive text message support—double the quit rate of teens that do not receive text message reminders.

SmokeFree TXT, under the umbrella of SmokeFree.gov, is available for both English and Spanish speakers.

“The overall goal of SmokeFree.gov is to make smoking cessation readily available to people no matter where they are in the mobile health space,” says Erik Auguston of The National Cancer Institute. “SmokeFree TXT allows us to deliver behavioral intervention and treatment to users.”

With a texting campaign, it’s easier to gather data and measure its effectiveness.

“When a person opts in, we ask them their gender, age, and how many cigarettes they smoke each day,” McKelvie explains. “We ask people about once a week, ‘Are you still smoke-free?’ This has helped us see if the campaign is more effective for teens or adults.”

SmokeFree.gov will create similar smoking cessation texting programs for the Veteran’s Administration and The Department of Defense.

“The backend technology and platform is very sophisticated and it allows us to think about these texts like conversations,” Auguston says. “Plus, I have found the Mobile Commons team to be responsive and great to work with.”

To opt-in to SmokeFreeTXT, a person can text QUIT to IQUIT (47848). They can also sign up online at SmokeFree.gov.

Chatting with a counselor

Remember what it felt like being a teenager and having a lot of questions about sex—and not knowing whom to ask?

Mobile Commons works with Planned Parenthood to help get these questions answered. Over the past three years, more than 250,000 teens have opted into this service.

A new study from the Journal of Medical Internet Research shows that the program has helped relieve teenage anxiety and confusion about sex. The program allows a live health educator to respond to a teenager’s questions by SMS or online chat, quickly and privately.

By using their mobile phone, teens don’t have to worry about using a public or family computer to talk about personal issues or health problems. Questions are answered through the integration tool, Live Person, making it easy for users to have a one-on-one conversation with an expert.

The campaign has been promoted at Planned Parenthood offices, on the Planned Parenthood website and on TV shows such as Teen Mom and 16 and Pregnant.

Directing people to the right information

If you’re in New York City, you’ll see ads all over buses, encouraging people to get flu shots. The calls-to-action on the ads tell people to text “FLU” to 877877.

When people text in, they are prompted to enter their address. In return, they will receive a message with the location of the nearest flu shot center.

Related: Download 5 Ways Mobile is Improving Healthcare Outcomes.

Mobile Commons helped the New York City Health Department create the campaign. The flu shot locator is a completely automated system. To set it up, all the department had to do was upload a spreadsheet of all the locations at which someone could get a flu vaccination.

This information and locator look-up tool can also be used for vaccines, clinic locators, and health fairs.

Helping people eat more healthily

The University of Maryland’s Food Supplement Nutrition Education program uses the Mobile Commons platform to send out tips to parents about how to help their children live healthier lifestyles.

The text messages include recipe ideas, fitness tips, school activities, and more. More than 1,000 parents have opted in to the program. Following a one-semester pilot, a survey showed that “73 percent of parents take the actions in the text messages always or most of the time.”

“We’re reaching out to parents and giving them tips on what to buy near them,” says Gloria Fong, Director of Client Experience at Mobile Commons. “For example, instead of just saying, ‘go to a store and buy fruit,’ we say, ‘Bananas are on sale at Food Lion for 20 cents a pound.”

Sending medication reminders

New York Presbyterian, Columbia University, and the Harlem Health Promotion Center createdProject STAY (Services to Assist Youth), a program that sends text message alerts to remind young people with HIV/AIDS to take their medication. Mobile Commons helped set up the text messaging service for the project.

“All the alert says is ‘remember,’” Fong says about the text reminders. “It still keeps the patient’s privacy in mind. It doesn’t say, ‘Remember to take your HIV medicine.”

Patients can also get text message reminders for eye exams, doctor’s appointments, or birth control. The messages also include the contact information for the clinic, in case a patient has to reschedule or cancel the appointment.

Mobile campaigns are improving health care outcomes across the country by reaching people on the device they use the most—their mobile phones. The ability to send personalized messages in a cost-effective manner has become increasingly important for health care institutions in a time where resources are limited. Text messaging can be a powerful and valuable tool for organizations to use to make an impact in their communities, from promoting healthy behaviors to raising awareness on important issues.

 


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David Mattioli's curator insight, November 6, 2014 7:17 AM

Using mobile apps to promote a healthier lifestyle and collect data.   I think that this is a great way to reach and communicate with people today, especially the younger generation.

 

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GE launches iPad app GE MIND to track neurological disorders | mobihealthnews

GE launches iPad app GE MIND to track neurological disorders | mobihealthnews | MHealth | Scoop.it

GE Healthcare launched a new app and website this month called GE MIND, which stands for Make an Impact on Neurological Disorders.

GE MIND aims to identify ”gaps in current frameworks for the prediction, detection, diagnosis, and care of people with neurological disorders and to propose viable solutions,” according to the app’s description.


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Samsung creating center for digital health care innovationto accelerate the development of mobile technologies for preventive health care

Samsung creating center for digital health care innovationto accelerate the development of mobile technologies for preventive health care | MHealth | Scoop.it
UCSF and electronics giant Samsung are establishing a center for digital health care innovation.

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Marc Phippen's curator insight, February 24, 2014 4:26 AM

UCSF and electronics giant Samsung are establishing a center for digital health care innovation, they said Friday, an endeavor that seeks to accelerate the development of mobile technologies for preventive health care.

The lab, to be located on UCSF's Mission Bay campus, will function as a kind of cross-cultural exchange, the rare kind of space where technologists and innovators will be able to validate technologies like smartphone apps or wearable sensors alongside top medical researchers. At the same time, researchers and clinicians will be able to funnel ideas through Samsung designers and engineers.

"Technologists, their experience is focusing on designing better functioning, more appealing technology, and that generally works with consumers," said Dr. Michael Blum, UCSF's associate vice chancellor for Informatics. "We typically focus on the problem, not the design. We approach it from two very different perspectives. The goal is to get all those people under one roof, so we can work as one piece instead of two different silos."


Noël Ashekian's curator insight, February 24, 2014 12:54 PM

Like Apple, Samsung is also making sizable investments in the healthcare field.

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The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed

The three critical factors wearable devices need to succeed | MHealth | Scoop.it

Wearables may be the tech du jour, but the next generation of devices and services needs to focus more on keeping users engaged in the long-term. These three factors, based on behavioral science, can help them do just that.

 

1. Habit formation. Sustained engagement depends on a device or service’s ability to help the user form and stick with new habits. Wearable devices have the potential, all too often unrealized, to make the process of habit formation more effective and efficient than ever before. The best engagement strategies for wearables move beyond just presenting data (steps, calories, stairs) and directly address the elements of the habit loop (cue, routine, reward), triggering the deep-seated psychological sequences that lead to the establishment of new habits.

 

2. Social motivation. To sustain engagement beyond the initial habit formation, a device or service must be able to motivate users effectively. Social connections are a particularly powerful source of motivation that can be leveraged in many creative ways. In addition to using social connections to influence behavior, social media and networking sites can be exploited to alter habits for positive outcomes.

 

3. Goal reinforcement. To achieve sustained engagement, a user also needs to experience a feeling of progress toward defined goals. Research shows that achieving several smaller goals provides the positive momentum necessary for achieving bigger goals. Wearable products and services that help people experience continuous progress can do so, for example, through real-time updates that are powered by big data and insights. Facilitating personal progress in this way leads to improved health, user satisfaction and long-term sustained engagement.

 

more at http://gigaom.com/2014/02/22/the-three-critical-factors-wearable-devices-need-to-succeed/

 


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This Virtual Assistant Is Like Siri For Doctors And Patients

This Virtual Assistant Is Like Siri For Doctors And Patients | MHealth | Scoop.it
Alme for Healthcare is a digital assistant app designed for doctors and patients with diseases.

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Technique Lets Doctors Measure Vital Signs with Just a Cell Phone Camera

Technique Lets Doctors Measure Vital Signs with Just a Cell Phone Camera | MHealth | Scoop.it
A remote heart monitoring device is only the latest innovation in telemedical technology and home healthcare.

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JMIR--Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives ...

JMIR--Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives ... | MHealth | Scoop.it
Considerations for Community-Based mHealth Initiatives: Insights From Three Beacon Communities.
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mDiabetes: mHealth to Prevent Diabetes in India

This video delivers progress on a CGI Commitment to Action by Arogya World.
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Putting diabetes awareness information in the hands of one million Indians

Putting diabetes awareness information in the hands of one million Indians | MHealth | Scoop.it

Diabetes is rampant in India – 60 million-plus Indians are currently living with the disease and one million die from it each year. Furthermore, Indians tend to get the disease at an earlier age – often in their 30s and 40s – during their prime earning years.

 

In September, Arogya World announced that we have reached more than 1,000,000 people from all over India with a series of 56 diabetes prevention and education text messages in 12 languages, fulfilling a

 

Commitment we made at the 2011 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting. Analysis of the program is ongoing, but initial results look very promising.

 

In 2012, Nokia Life helped Arogya World recruit 1,052,633 consumers who opted-in to receive mDiabetes text messages. Messages were provided free to subscribers twice a week for six months. Participants came from all over India and a variety of socio-economic backgrounds.

 

Arogya World developed the 56 text messages with Emory University in late 2011, based on science and behavior change theory, and then, with Ipsos, consumer-tested them in simulated conditions as well as in the real world. Nokia Life provided the translation and transmission infrastructure, and transmitted more than 56 million mDiabetes text messages to the consumers throughout 2012.

 

Following the program, consumers’ awareness of diabetes and its complications increased, and promising trends in behavior change included:

 

* An 11% increase in daily exercise

* A 15% increase in the intake of 2-3 servings of fruits a day

* An 8% increase in 2-3 servings of vegetables a day.


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Health IT will dictate how health is provided in the future

Health IT will dictate how health is provided in the future | MHealth | Scoop.it

Health IT is hot and health IT will be leading the revolution and health IT will transform itself and health care. The big (and rather comfortable) enterprise health IT will just get stronger and bigger to better support industry consolidation.

 

The little data feeder and analytics health IT will service the big health IT. It is very possible that some of these new consumer apps will gain huge market share and become big health IT (just big, not enterprise), and most likely this is why venture capital is investing. Take home lesson for little health IT: you can’t beat them, so the best strategy is to join them. And if you think something is missing from this (too) long dissertation, like patient empowerment for example, think again.

 

Yes, we will have health IT ATMs where we can get a little information when stranded in a strange city, but when was the last time you walked into a Chase bank and cashed a Bank of America check? And when was the last time your Fidelity financial advisor was able to peruse your various accounts at your current bank and all banks you used in the past, to better advise you on saving for retirement? Come to think of it, when was the last time you switched banks? And how much transactional history was interoperated between your old bank and your new bank?

 

 more: http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/10/health-dictate-health-future.html
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Steve Kingsley's curator insight, October 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I think the title should be: "Health IT will dictate how health services will be provided in the future."