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Digital Health Companies Rush To Integrate With Apple's HealthKit

Digital Health Companies Rush To Integrate With Apple's HealthKit | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Notwithstanding HealthKit’s aborted launch due to a software bug, digital health companies have jumped at the opportunity to integrate their products with Apple AAPL +0.51%’s HealthKit, a hub of personal health data that consumers can display in Apple’s new Health app in iOS 8. Many are betting that the tech giant has the clout and reach to make Health an indispensable tool for patients looking to engage with their doctors outside the clinic. “It’s going to be the biggest health release ever,” says Daniel Kivatinos, a founder of electronic health record provider drchrono.

It might take some time for doctors still struggling with electronic health records to widely accept the deluge of data HealthKit brings, but many companies don’t want to be caught flat-footed. Soon after Apple announced HealthKit in June, HealthLoop went to work to integrate its software. The start-up allows doctors to check in with their patients between visits, especially post surgery, to follow their progress. Patients who underwent joint replacement, for example, can now opt to share with their doctors who prescribe HealthLoop, the number of steps they took or their temperature from trackers and blue-tooth enabled devices uploaded through HealthKit.  A lack of activity or a spike in fever, can prompt a clinician to intervene. “HealthLoop is able to wrap these streams of biometric data with clinical context,” says Jordan Shlain, founder of HealthLoop and a practicing internist.

The application of biometric data in a defined clinical context, such as hypertension or diabetes, is critical in determining the success of monitoring devices with health care providers, as well as patients who are motivated to engage because of illness. “If data comes in and is not actionable, no one is going to bother,” says Michael Blum, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco, and director of its Center for Digital Health Innovation, which validates tracking devices in a clinical setting.

iHealth Labs, a subsidiary of Chinese medical equipment company Andon Health, which Apple chose as a partner to pilot HealthKit, sells FDA-approved wireless blood pressure and glucose monitors, among other tracking tools. Data from blood pressure cuffs are uploaded onto mobile devices, such as the iPhone and iPad, and are currently used in clinical studies at UCSF, and the VA Medical Center in San Francisco.

iHealth’s chief marketing officer Jim Taschetta says Apple introduced the company to electronic health records vendors Epic Systems and UK-based EMIS Group, as well as Stanford University, and Duke Medicine. To test HealthKit, Duke incorporated readings from iHealth blood pressure monitors into its Epic patient portal. Epic has integrated its MyChart with HealthKit, but it is up to its customers to decide whether they want to enable sharing. Taschetta is encouraged to see a handful of health care leaders adopt HealthKit. “The odds are in our favor to see widespread adoption,” he says.

Other companies tying into HealthKit include electronic health record providers Cerner CERN +0.29%, drchrono, and athenahealth .


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For digital health investors, which segments carry the greatest risk?

For digital health investors, which segments carry the greatest risk? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

What three healthcare investments represent the biggest risk for digital health investors? An AARP report highlights them.


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Healthy ageing: A utopia or an opportunity for new technologies? - mHealth

Healthy ageing: A utopia or an opportunity for new technologies? - mHealth | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

A drastic change is expected in the age structure of the European population. While in 2010 the more numerous age-group was people in their 40s, in 2060 it is predicted that it will be the group of these over 60 years old...

 

A series of problems (arise): from how can healthcare be provided to everybody, to how to pay the pensions of an increasingly old population, which also has less active people who contribute to taxes.

Many experts agree that new technologies, and mobile technologies in particular, can become a key factor in the solution of these new challenges. In fact, we have already manifold mobile solutions which can be useful in helping make ageing healthier. But they are not enough.

 


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ET Russell's curator insight, October 6, 4:20 PM

Joan Cornet Prat, Director. mHealth Competence Center, MWC leaves us with some food for thought:

 

- At the moment, Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) is (allowing) digital monitoring of vital signs, easing the control of patients with chronic diseases and patient communication with health professionals.

 

- new technologies, and mobile technologies and mHealth in particular, are ready. Now it is time for governments and the people responsible for health and social welfare to put into motion the right strategies, taking into account all the factors that are part of elderly people's lives.

 

- key to the future does not lie on classifying people, but on personalising medicine and patient attention. And to this end, mobile solutions can play a major role. Technology is ready.

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What mHealth investment trends mean for day-to-day practice

What mHealth investment trends mean for day-to-day practice | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Digital health investment report from Startup Health highlights potential impacts on clinical practice The post What mHealth investment trends mean for day-to-day practice appeared first on iMedicalApps.


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Report : Taking Digital Health to the Next Level

Report : Taking Digital Health to the Next Level | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
This report draws on the views and experiences of experts and innovators in the field of digital health technology to make recommendations for overcoming barriers to its adoption.

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Find out how connected you are with your body thanks to WLSA

Find out how connected you are with your body thanks to WLSA | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Find out how connected you are with your body thanks to WLSA!


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Art Jones's curator insight, October 4, 12:42 PM

The Internet of Everything #IOE 

(we are being wired to monitor everything and send it anywhere)

#quatifiedself 

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4 Wearables That Give You Superpowers

4 Wearables That Give You Superpowers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Super strength. Super hearing. Super artistry. Super expression. The future of wearables is really a quest for human enhancement.

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StartUp Health Insights - Digital Health Funding Rankings Q3 2014

If you thought last year was big for digital health funding, take a look at this year's numbers. According to StartUp Health's Q3 funding report, investors hav…

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Medical Calculators Use Big Data to Help Patients Make Choices

Medical Calculators Use Big Data to Help Patients Make Choices | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Doctors are turning to clinical calculators that crunch big data to help patients make informed medical decisions.


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Denise Silber's curator insight, September 26, 3:09 AM

Thanks to @giomarsi for pointing this out.

 

 
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Digital Health Ear Thermometer Integrates with Apple HealthKit

Digital Health Ear Thermometer Integrates with Apple HealthKit | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Swaive has developed a digital health smart thermometer that integrates with Apple HealthKit that analyzes temperature and provides critical information.

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Medical Innovations to Expect by 2064 | HealthWorks Collective

Medical Innovations to Expect by 2064 | HealthWorks Collective | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The Fred Alger Management team reached out to me recently asking what innovative changes I thought the medical and healthcare industry will be going through over the next 50 years. As Yogi Berra famously quipped “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future,” but I thought I’d give it a shot.

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How mHealth and data integration impact patient engagement

How mHealth and data integration impact patient engagement | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Integrating data from mobile health applications and other sources with a patient's electronic health record (EHR) offers more data and greater patient engagement, but industry leaders encourage providers to carefully consider what--and how...
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ePharma Summit: mHealth Explained in Facts

ePharma Summit: mHealth Explained in Facts | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Twenty two facts on #mHealth- http://t.co/3PEfCcTJJw
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How Big Data Is Changing Medicine

How Big Data Is Changing Medicine | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
SOURCE October 3, 2014 Here’s how science usually works: Come up with a question or a hypothesis. Develop an experiment to test it and create data. As any middle school student could tell you, it’s called the scientific method. Now, some researchers and entrepreneurs in the Bay Area say that method is being upended, especially when it comes to medicine. Consider what happened in the pediatric intensive care unit at Stanford’s Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital a few years ago. In 2011, a young g

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Epic updates MyChart app to sync with Apple Health, huge for mobile health - iMedicalApps

Epic updates MyChart app to sync with Apple Health, huge for mobile health - iMedicalApps | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Epic adds Track my Health feature, enabling millions of patient's to sync Apple Health data to their medical records.

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Silicon Valley's Top Ten Tech Trends

Silicon Valley's Top Ten Tech Trends | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Trend #4: Health insurance industry mirrors Kodak and goes ‘poof!’

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Art Jones's curator insight, October 3, 5:05 PM

Some percent of the predictions made in this article will become true.


What do you think about this one > Trend #4: Health insurance industry mirrors Kodak and goes ‘poof!’ 

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Mayo Clinic Launches App with Apple HealthKit Integration

Mayo Clinic Launches App with Apple HealthKit Integration | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
On Thursday, Mayo Clinic launched its mobile health app with Apple HealthKit integration available to Mayo Clinic patients and the general public, VB first reports.

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COM SALUD's curator insight, October 6, 10:52 AM

El acceso a los datos clínicos es la clave en la que se moverán aplicaciones y wearables en los próximos años y para los que plataformas como Health Kit han abierto el camino. Las autoridades sanitarias deberán estar atentas a controlar la confidencialidad y encriptación de esos datos y los profesionales para sacarles el máximo partido. De todo ello hablaremos en el I Congreso de Wearables y Big Data en Salud

Mark Davis's curator insight, October 7, 9:48 AM

Patients can contact their care team directly through secure messaging and manage appointments.

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Health app market to reach $6.7 billion by the end of 2014

Health app market to reach $6.7 billion by the end of 2014 | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
RT @derekjones1951: Health app market to reach $6.7 billion by the end of 2014 - http://t.co/CqRlrq35Tq #mHealth
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Will 2015 be the year mHealth takes off?

Will 2015 be the year mHealth takes off? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

I’ve been toiling in the field of connected health for 20 years now, watching for signs of adoption that will move us into the steep part of the curve.  I have to wonder, with announcements from several huge consumer companies recently, if that time is coming.

By now you’ve heard about Apple’s HealthKit announcement, which involved not only Apple, but Mayo Clinic and Epic.

Samsung is not sitting still, having released increasingly sophisticated versions of their S Health app.

 

Rumor has it that Samsung will also be coming out soon with the next version of their Galaxy Smartphone accompanied by a developers’ toolkit for health apps.  Google will be launching Google Fit.

Some of this exuberance (is it rational?) also involves excitement around wearables, and the intersection of mHealth and wearables is an area of particular interest.  To wit, Microsoft is rumored to be introducing a smartwatch this fall, amid lots of interest at Google, Apple and Samsung in the role of the smartwatch in mHealth.

OK, you get the picture.  Any analyst worth her salt has got to be predicting a break-out year for mHealth.  The mHealth market is said to have been $1.95B in 2012, growing to $49B by 2020; the wearables market is predicted to be $12B by 2018, of which 60% will be health tracking.  We just coined a new term, the Internet of (Healthy) Things to describe this convergence.

What’s not to like here?  Well, I’m not sure, but there are some reasons to be cautious.  Better still, there are some things we must get right as we steward this amazing opportunity to harness a game-changing technology (mobile) and apply it to the laudable goal of improving the health of our citizens.

First the words of caution.  My friend Nancy used to tell me she hated to be the skunk at the picnic, and those words ring true here. But allow me a couple of comments contrary to all of the enthusiasm.  As noted previously, if HealthKit is just another place to store health-related data — moving from a web application to a mobile phone — do we really think consumers are going to jump for joy?  Santayana said, “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”  Did we learn the lessons from Google’s failed PHR? From Microsoft’s HealthVault?  If you build it, they do not necessarily come.  For health, it has to be more compelling than that.

Here are some facts that remind us of the challenge:

Although one out of ten U.S. adults over the age of 18 owns an activity tracker, within six months, one-third stops using it.More than 80% of health apps that are downloaded are abandoned within two weeks.Also of note, Aetna discontinued CarePass, seemingly because their members weren’t enthralled by it.

Most app development is based on the adage, “Give the people what they want.”  Snapchat, Instagram, Tinder, etc., are all designed to meet a basic human need in a very simple way.  The challenge in health care is that, though we know what patients/consumers need to do to improve their health, most of them don’t want to hear about it. That makes building “sticky” health apps and devices much tougher than a messaging or photo sharing app.

Today, most health care app development is still confusing education with inspiration. They are not equivalent!  I’ve told the story before about how we check our smartphones 150 times per day. But in a blood pressure monitoring study at the Center for Connected Health, we had difficulty getting patients to push one button once a day to participate in a program their doctor enthusiastically recommended for them.

What, then, do we do to take full advantage of the opportunity that Samsung, Apple, Google and others are providing us?  The answer, simple and yet elusive, is this: focus on engagement.

Over these 20 years, I’ve seen technologies come and go, trends take hold and others fade away. We are learning a great deal about how to empower patients to self-manage their health, and what to do with all of this patient-generated data. The common denominator, the one critical element we must get right, is how to ‘sell’ health to consumers and keep them coming back for more. I say it’s got to be personal, motivational and ubiquitous. What do you say?

Joseph Kvedar is director, Center for Connected Health, Partners HealthCare. He blogs at The cHealth Blog.


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Keith McGuinness's curator insight, October 1, 7:43 PM

One reason to be cautious is a problem of semantics.  There are too many words that seem suddenly to mean different things to different people.  ‘Engagement’ is one of them.  Jargon proliferates rapidly at the beginning of something.  As the stewards of connected health or mHealth, or whatever more useful term emerges, we must be cautious about jargon.  I believe the perfectly good word ‘engagement’ is becoming jargon.  Too many are using this word as if it were a bona fide health metric. 


I too have been at this for more than 20 years, but from the developer side.  Developers love engagement.  They compete for advertising dollars based on engagement.  Engagement can mean, ‘whatever gets a consumer to return to my app.’ Stickiness is neutral.


Consider this.  A consumer (aka a patient) is offered a choice between two apps.  Both apps promise to help with behavioral issues that affect hypertension.  Both apps are equally engaging.  But only one of them is effective to reduce hypertension.  The consumer does not know which one.  Under such conditions the choice, based on engagement alone, is a 50-50 proposition.  Half of the patients, drawn in by ‘engagement’ will choose a behavioral placebo.


As for CarePass, it is/was a platform offered by Aetna, a health plan.  If you are a health plan that wants to enthrall app developers, provide a platform that reimburses for the apps that join it, that would be enthralling.  To be fair to Aetna, if you are an app developer that wants to enthrall a health plan, measure outcomes continuously, that would likewise be enthralling, and reimbursable.


Outcomes first, then engagement.

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Time for health insurance companies to act like D2C businesses

Time for health insurance companies to act like D2C businesses | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

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Art Jones's curator insight, October 1, 5:06 PM

I think they meant to say B2C


#ACA is once again driving change where it's needed

Greg Judd's curator insight, October 2, 12:57 AM

Al Waxman's Psilos is always up to something worth paying attention to.....

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Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record

Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

iHealth was the first company to sell a medical device through Apple, so it's only natural it's also the first to fully integrate its products with Apple's HealthKit. That means all the data iHealth's connected monitors and trackers collect not only gets sent straight to the app, it's also automagically logged in your electronic health record.

This is really exciting news. When Apple initially announced the Health app and HealthKit platform, it sounded like the holistic approach to health data we'd been waiting for. The app looked like an ever-evolving, personal electronic health record. Even hospitals were helping design the thing! Of course, anybody who got a sneak peek at the app wondered where exactly the health data was going to come from and how it would get to doctors. Obviously, Apple was thinking about this, too.

So a couple of months ago, Apple approached iHealth to help fully integrate the company's popular suite of connected medical devices into the Health app. In developing the new workflow, iHealth maintained its tradition of making the device experience as simple as possible. That also means that it also needed to be easy to transfer the data between devices and to allow it to be shared. You can manually input data, as well, and which data gets shared is up to you. Indeed, the finished product is downright elegant.


Now, if you've upgraded to iOS 8, you can seamlessly send data from your iHealth devices to the Health app, where you can look at and compare trends over time. If your health care provider uses Epic to manage electronic health records, that data can then go straight to your chart, so your doctors has it at his fingertips next time you go in for a visit. The Health app and HealthKit integration works across all nine of iHealth's medical devices and can collect up to 15 different vital signs.

"Doctors have a more informed view," iHealth CMO Jim Taschetta told Gizmodo in an interview. "They can literally look at data you collected and adjust medication based on that." He added, "I think this is a really important turning point in how digital health monitoring can make a difference. This is an exciting time."

Of course, if your doctor doesn't use Epic for electronic health records, this innovation is probably slightly less exciting. There are other ways to share the data with your doctor, and over time, the HealthKit platform will surely support more hospitals, doctors, and electronic health records systems. Just as iHealth's first connected devices opened up a new category of medical devices so many years ago, this new, deep integration with iOS is only the beginning.

Images via iHealth


Via Alex Butler, Chaturika Jayadewa, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, dbtmobile
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Sandy Williams Spencer's curator insight, September 30, 10:53 AM

This could be so important during a medical event. 

www.free-alzheimers-support.com

Olivia Klenda's curator insight, September 30, 6:50 PM

The new HealthKit is a great way to keep track of your personal health records, exercise, and eating habits. 

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The future of healthcare: live-saving innovations for the bottom billion

The future of healthcare: live-saving innovations for the bottom billion | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
From India to Mexico, meet the innovators in open-heart surgery and palliative care developing unconventional health solutions Many of the most radical health innovations, that will improve the lives of hundreds of millions of people, will come...

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , dbtmobile
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Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare? - NASDAQ

Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare? - NASDAQ | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
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Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare?
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By comparison, Google has taken an industry-straddling approach to healthcare, expanding into biotech, medical devices, and mobile health at the same time.
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