mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
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mDiabetes: Putting Health Information Literally Into the Hand of Consumers

mDiabetes: Putting Health Information Literally Into the Hand of Consumers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Diabetes is rampant in India – 60 million-plus Indians are currently living with the disease and one million die from it each year. Furthermore, Indians tend to get the disease at an earlier age – often in their 30s and 40s – during their prime earning years.

In September, Arogya World announced that we have reached more than 1,000,000 people from all over India with a series of 56 diabetes prevention and education text messages in 12 languages, fulfilling a Commitment we made at the 2011 Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Annual Meeting. Analysis of the program is ongoing, but initial results look very promising.

Following the program, consumers’ awareness of diabetes and its complications increased, and promising trends in behavior change included:

an 11% increase in daily exercise,a 15% increase in the intake of 2-3 servings of fruits a day,and an 8% increase in 2-3 servings of vegetables a day.

Prevention is Key

Photo Credit: Nokia

The WHO says that approximately 80% of heart disease and diabetes and 40% of cancers can be prevented through healthy lifestyles such as avoiding tobacco use, eating healthy foods and increasing daily physical activity. We decided to “go big” with mDiabetes because we know that it is a sustainable and scalable model for disease prevention that can be rolled out in countries around the world. And mobile phones are our technology of choice because they are widely used globally – with about 900 million cell phone subscribers in India alone.

How mDiabetes Works

In 2012, Nokia Life helped Arogya World recruit 1,052,633 consumers who opted-in to receive mDiabetes text messages. Messages were provided free to subscribers twice a week for six months. Participants came from all over India and a variety of socio-economic backgrounds.

Arogya World developed the 56 text messages with Emory University in late 2011, based on science and behavior change theory, and then, with Ipsos, consumer-tested them in simulated conditions as well as in the real world. Nokia Life provided the translation and transmission infrastructure, and transmitted more than 56 million mDiabetes text messages to the consumers throughout 2012.

We’re Not Done Yet

After we complete analysis of the first million, Arogya World plans to scale-up the program to reach and help millions more in India and beyond.  Future plans include partnerships with global health organizations, governments and private sector partners to expand the program even farther. We’re also exploring the development of a diabetes prevention “app” for consumers, as well as multimedia content on complications of diabetes and other non-communicable diseases.

mDiabetes, the largest diabetes prevention mHealth program in the world, was designed and implemented by Arogya World in partnership with Nokia Life.  Other partners include Emory University, Johnson & Johnson, and Ipsos.

Tags: CGI, Diabetes, health, mDiabetes, mobile, mobile health, NCDs, nutrition, Oct13, WHO


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What do patients and carers want from health apps?

What do patients and carers want from health apps? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.

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COM SALUD's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:53 AM

La tecnología ha dejado de ser un obstáculo para los pacientes, incluso para los mayores, debido a la generalización de los smartphones y a los dispositivos wearables, que se integran en la ropa y complementos, y que no necesitan conocimientos tecnológicos del usuario para poder monitorizar la salud y comunicarse con los profesionales sanitarios. En el I Congreso de Wearables y Big Data en Salud se presentarán ejemplos de esta tecnología intuitiva y útil para pacientes crónicos o dependientes, así como para quienes apuestan por la prevención.

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IBM Watson: How it Works - YouTube

Learn how IBM Watson works and has similar thought processes to a human. http://www.ibm.com/watson

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 11, 2014 2:16 PM

#TheFutureofHealthcare

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Algorithm identifies rare genetic disorders from family pics

Algorithm identifies rare genetic disorders from family pics | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
SOURCE October 16, 2014 Oxford University researchers have developed a computer program that can diagnose rare genetic disorders in children simply by analysing regular photographs. The program works by recognising certain characteristic facial structures that can be present with certain conditions, including Down's syndrome, Teacher Collins, Progeria, Fragile X and Angelman syndrome. It combines computer vision and machine learning to scan pictures for similarities to a database of pictures of people with known conditions, and then returns matches ranked by likelihood. One person in 17 has a genetic disorder, which can be difficult to diagnose. Between 30 and 40 percent of the 7,000 or so rare genetic disorders involve some change in the face and skull. Having a diagnosis can help parents understand the risks for other children and how likely a condition is to be passed on. It can also improve estimates of how the disease will progress or help identify which symptoms are caused by

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Apple Watch and HealthKit: A new age of virtual health care

Apple Watch and HealthKit: A new age of virtual health care | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
I think that technologies such as the HealthKit and the Apple Watch are giant leaps forward.

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Google made a 'Google Drive for genomes,' and it wants hospitals and universities to sign on

Google made a 'Google Drive for genomes,' and it wants hospitals and universities to sign on | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Google wants to help university labs and hospitals store their clients’ genomes in the cloud, and they’re calling the effort "Google Genomics."


Google wants researchers to "explore genetic...

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In-depth: Samsung, Qualcomm mobile platforms | Samsung and Qualcomm are already squarely targeting healthcare providers

In-depth: Samsung, Qualcomm mobile platforms | Samsung and Qualcomm are already squarely targeting healthcare providers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Apple, Google and Microsoft are driving platforms that at least have the potential to rattle the healthcare landscape, but two companies already have offerings gaining traction with providers.

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Intel Turns to Wearables, Big Data to Fight Parkinson's

Intel Turns to Wearables, Big Data to Fight Parkinson's | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Medical researchers today have only a rudimentary understanding of how Parkinson's disease progresses in patients. In collaboration with the Michael J. Fox Foundation, Intel is helping researchers use wearable devices, the Internet of Things and big data technologies to collect and analyze patient data.

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App Lets You Peek Inside 80,000 Foods At Your Grocery Store

App Lets You Peek Inside 80,000 Foods At Your Grocery Store | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Looking beyond a nutrition label, Food Scores rates your grub based upon its pesticides, antibiotics, and processing.
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Connected gadgets will help patients take back their health information. Are they ready for it?

Connected gadgets will help patients take back their health information. Are they ready for it? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
A smart inhaler can warn a doctor a patient is having trouble before they go to the emergency room. But if patients have increased access to their data, they also will need to know how to manage it.

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Vigisys's curator insight, November 2, 2014 5:15 AM

Les patients sont ils prêts à se prendre en charge, et gérer leur données médicales ? C'est un enjeu important du développement de la médecine connectée. Quelques bonnes idées dans cette intervention.

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Report: mHealth Apps Market Ripe for Transformation

Report: mHealth Apps Market Ripe for Transformation | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The mHealth Apps Market is ripe for transformation with powerful new entrants such as Apple, Google, ad Samsung joining the space says ABI Research.
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Klara - ask a dermatologist today

Klara - ask a dermatologist today | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Get Klara - ask a dermatologist today on the App Store. See screenshots and ratings, and read customer reviews.
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New concierge service for chronic conditions gives access to live health coaches through smartphones

New concierge service for chronic conditions gives access to live health coaches through smartphones | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Vida launched a mobile health app to provide advice and guidance for people with chronic conditions and cancer patients with live health coaches accessed through text and video

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American Institute Health Care Professionals's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:39 PM

Healthcare Life coaching advice at the click of a button?   A new service will allow you access to a live health care coach through the use of your smartphone.   Preventative healthcare has never been easier.

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This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED

This Device Diagnoses Hundreds of Diseases Using a Single Drop of Blood | WIRED | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers.

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dagautier's curator insight, November 12, 2014 8:17 AM

"Right now, rHEALTH is reliable for cell counts, HIV detection, vitamin D levels, and various protein markers in the body. The next challenges, according to Chan, are adding more tests, scaling up production, and going through the laborious process of getting the rHEALTH commercialized. The company is manufacturing three different models: the rHEALTH One, which will be used for translational research; the rHEALTH X, meant to be used as a kind of power tool for clinicians; and the rHEALTH X1, which will be available for consumers."

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Why Google's Cancer-Detecting Pill Is More Than Just Hype | WIRED

Why Google's Cancer-Detecting Pill Is More Than Just Hype | WIRED | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Before Google started work on a pill that could detect cancers and other diseases by sending magnetic nanoparticles into your bloodstream, it talked to Sam Gambhir.

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Art Jones's curator insight, November 11, 2014 8:54 AM

More from the health sciences effort inside Google X, and its “Moonshot” research lab.

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Qualcomm And The George Institute For Global Health Establish The China Center For MHealth Innovation

Qualcomm And The George Institute For Global Health Establish The China Center For MHealth Innovation | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
-- New Initiative Designed to Support the Development of Community Healthcare and Contribute to Mobile Health Innovation in China --
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Consumer devices can help monitor such conditions as hypertension and diabetes

Consumer devices can help monitor such conditions as hypertension and diabetes | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

By Consumer Reports November 3

The modern health-device craze started with pedometers that simply tracked the number of steps you took in a day. Now there are hundreds of gadgets that you can slap on your wrist or tuck into your pocket.

They sync up to your smartphone and track everything from blood pressure and calories burned to how stressed you are and how well you slept last night.

But how effective are those gadgets in keeping you healthy? “That’s the big question,” says Steven Steinhubl, a cardiologist and director of the digital medicine program at Scripps Health in La Jolla, Calif.

He says published research shows that some devices on the market still have kinks to iron out. For example, one lets you take a photo of a skin lesion with your smartphone and tells you whether it’s cancerous. But it got the diagnosis wrong a third of the time.

The devices that experts say are most useful right now are those that help monitor common, chronic conditions. For example, a study at the University of Florida found that home blood pressure monitors and blood glucose meters gave doctors valuable information to help them treat people with hypertension and diabetes.


The Fitbit One activity tracker counts steps and logs calories. (Courtesy of Fitbit)

The devices also helped patients get more involved in their own care.

In a study published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, older patients recovering from heart surgery wore activity trackers, which are devices that count steps taken and calories burned.

The patients who took the most steps early on had shorter hospital stays. The researchers concluded that trackers might motivate patients to move more after surgery, which can speed recovery.

Here are three devices that Consumer Reports found accurate in its tests. All can be synced to your computer, smartphone or both, though sometimes that requires buying other software.

Blood pressure monitor: iHealth Dock BP3, $100

What it does: Allows you to track and store your blood pressure and heart-rate results on your iPhone or iPad and to share the information with your doctor. It also offers a blood pressure risk indicator and a detector for irregular heartbeats.

Best for: Older adults, whose blood pressure can vary; people whose blood pressure tends to spike when tested in a doctor’s office (a condition called white-coat hypertension); people with diabetes, for whom blood pressure monitoring is important.


The Accu-Chek Aviva Expert monitors blood glucose and includes a built-in bolus calculator. (Courtesy of Accu-Chek)

Blood glucose meter: Accu-Chek Aviva Expert, $20

What it does: Stores up to 500 readings of your blood glucose levels and calculates averages over time. Users can flag their results as pre- or post-meal for reference.

Best for: People with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes who take insulin.

Activity tracker: Fitbit One, $100

What it does: Counts steps, logs calories, monitors sleep and tells you how close you are to meeting daily health goals. It also has a clock and an alarm.

Best for: People who want a motivational tool to help them become more active.

 

Copyright 2014. Consumers Union of United States Inc.

For further guidance, go to www.ConsumerReports.org/Health, where more detailed information, including CR’s ratings of prescription drugs, treatments, hospitals and healthy-living products, is available to subscribers.


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New app scours baby pictures for eye health risks | mobihealthnews

New app scours baby pictures for eye health risks | mobihealthnews | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

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What is mHealth?

This video was filmed at the 2013 mHealth summit and captures a number of brief definitions of mHealth. How would you define mHealth?


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Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity?

Tablet computers in healthcare settings: novelty or necessity? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

As things currently stands, tablet computers are more than a novelty but are not as yet a necessity. Tablets are useful for data retrieval during ward rounds but their use as a tool to engage patients in the care process remains limited. Individual health professionals or organisations contemplating the introduction of mHealth are advised to speak to their IT department prior to purchasing tablet computers to understand their local clinical information systems requirements (e.g., operating system compatibility) and any limitations associated with translating the systems to smaller devices. Such considerations are critical if tablet computers are to deliver on their full potential.

 


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Bart Collet's comment, November 7, 2014 5:24 AM
deploying task assignment and -registration via tablets as we speak :)
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Mobile health startup Gauss Surgical raises $1.5M

Mobile health startup Gauss Surgical raises $1.5M | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Mobile health startup Gauss Surgical has raised $1.5 million through the sale of equity as part of a total offering that could reach more than $2 million, according to a filing with the SEC.
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Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support

Open thread: Microsoft Health's big advantage is cross-platform support | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Microsoft has been winning generally approving headlines for its Microsoft Band fitness tracker and accompanying Microsoft Health platform, since both were revealed – seemingly unintentionally at first – on Wednesday.

 

One of the key points about both hardware and software is their cross-platform nature: they won’t just be restricted to people with a Windows Phone smartphone and/or a computer running the Windows OS. They’ll also support Android, iOS and Mac.

 

Microsoft Health is also open to other devices and apps, with Jawbone’s Up and the apps MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal and RunKeeper the first to be announced.


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Laurent FLOURET's curator insight, October 31, 2014 9:19 AM

“We plan to have a regular cadence of Microsoft Health announcements including additional device and service partnerships, SDK availability and additional cross-platform applications and services,” blogged Microsoft’s Todd Holmdahl.

Bart Collet's comment, October 31, 2014 12:23 PM
true! aggregate or die!
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When will digital health go mainstream? When millennials are older and sicker

When will digital health go mainstream? When millennials are older and sicker | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
A panel discussion on mobile health at IMPACT 2014 varied from when it will go mainstream, people's comfort level with data sharing and telemedicine adoption.

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Look Here: Phone App Checks Photos For Eye Disease

Look Here: Phone App Checks Photos For Eye Disease | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Bryan Shaw showed it was possible to detect early signs of eye cancer from a family photo album. Now, he and his research team have made an iPhone app.
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100 healthcare statistics to know

100 healthcare statistics to know | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The term “healthcare” encompasses a wide variety of issues ranging from insurance coverage controversies and workforce compensation trends to prescription drug administration and health information technology.
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