mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
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This wearable device reads your brain waves. Is there a market for it?

This wearable device reads your brain waves. Is there a market for it? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“ The chief executive of the young Canadian company Interaxon, Garten sought to use brain-controlled interface technology -- a science fiction-like development that allows a device to be controlled by the brain's electrical activity -- in a wearable device. With Google's Glass and Nike's FuelBand leading the way, so-called wearables are expected to grow from an $8 billion (in annual revenue) market today to a $20 billion one by 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. Using brainwaves to control them seemed like, well, a no-brainer. But Garten wanted to create something meaningful -- something that people would use every day. Not a gadget or novelty. So she watched and waited for the market to develop. Muse, the company's new $299 brainwave-controlled headband, will start shipping in May. With a splashy debut at this year's Consumer Electronics Show and what Garten reports as strong pre-orders from consumers and corporate employee assistance programs, the company's wait to go into hardware appears to be paying off. Garten and her two co-founders, Trevor Coleman and Chris Aimone, started their Toronto-based company in 2009 and spent its first three years creating experiences driven by technology based on electroencepholagraphy, or EEG for short. Whether it was a chair that levitated into the air as a person became more relaxed or giving several thousand visitors to the 2010 Olympic Games the chance to change the lighting on Toronto's CN Tower, Canada's Parliament Building and Niagara Falls, the company showed users that their minds could influence the world. MORE: Is wearable technology just for geeks? The company earned roughly a million dollars per year doing branded installations. More importantly, though, the efforts yielded insights into how people interacted with the technology, helping Interaxon better understand how to apply EEG tech to a consumer product. Garten described a day when someone came into the lab to do one of their user tests. "It was the first time we had really test-run the algorithm which could tell when you were focused and when you got stressed," she says. "There was a little bleep on the screen every time he got distracted. My heart sort of jumped every time I saw that bleep." Her team realized what they had to offer people was a way to learn to exercise control over themselves. For the last two years the team has largely shut down its demonstration and consulting operations to focus on developing Muse, a personal EEG device that sends readings to your phone or tablet. "Basically, [it] teaches you to calm your mind," Garten says. "With a calm mind, you can do more in life." Muse is shaped like a conventional headband, but it sits on your ears like eyeglasses and runs across your face, just above the eyebrows. It has seven sensors that collect data. Garten says the included application has activities on it that help to calm and settle the mind, such as before bed. Soon, it might also be helpful for noticing when your mind has wandered during a task. MORE: Nike+ Fuelband SE: What wearables should be The company has raised about $7.5 million to date, Garten says. It closed a $6 million round last year, on an offered $5 million. One of its investors is the actor Ashton Kutcher, who worked references to a company resembling Interaxon into an episode of the CBS sitcom Two and a Half Men. Another part of their funding has come from an IndieGogo campaign, where it beat its $150,000 goal by $137,000. At this year's Consumer Electronics Show, people waited as long as an hour just to get a chance to try the Muse device. Garten estimated a 75% conversion rate for pre-order sales at the show. "As soon as people try it, they get it," she says. Muse is also already generating corporate sales. Garten declined to share specific figures but says that employee assistance programs are pre-ordering the device to help staff with stress, attention, and overall wellness. There may also be a market for inattentive children. Research from 2003 has shown that EEG based training can serve as a drug free alternative for treating ADHD. Still, similar devices didn't deliver. Zeo was a device that also took EEG readings of people to help them get better rest. The sleep industry is a $32 billion industry, and Zeo had $12.3 million in equity funding, according to a 2010 SEC filing. That's nearly twice what Interaxon has. But the company shut down. One reason it failed? Because the public didn't understand it. Less accurate sleep monitors that also measured other activities, such as the Fitbit or Jawbone's Up, undermined Zeo's market. User education, Garten says, is the biggest hurdle Interaxon faces. MORE: The third wave of computing There are a number of EEG products on the market, including those by the companies NeuroSky, Emotiv, and Mindwave. Garten believes that Interaxon is different because the company is vertically integrated -- even the algorithms, which are sophisticated enough to accommodate for different sleep patterns, moods, and sweat, are developed in house. Further research will extend its functionality, Garten says. "As we start to expand what Muse can do, those applications will be provided to Musers." Each headset will come with a software development kit to allow third-party developers to build upon that foundation. For professionals and creatives, the possibilities the technology creates could be game changing. Improving attention alone could be enough, but Microsoft's Head of Thought Leadership Kelly Jones recently wrote on Huffington Post that consumers are demanding technology that's "Intelligently On" -- technology that knows a movie is no time for a phone to ring and a software update notification that can wait until you've met your deadline. In other words, future technology ought to read your mind. Interaxon hopes that such a statement is as much literal as figurative. ”Posted in: electroencephalography (EEG), Interaxon, Muse, Wearables
Via Celine Sportisse, dbtmobile, Valeria Duflot
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The very presence of a mobile phone a distraction to the brain

The very presence of a mobile phone a distraction to the brain | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
People asked to carry out electronic tests of their attention spans by scientists from Hokkaido University in Japan were found to perform worse when a mobile phone was present.
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Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick, study shows

Wearable sensors can tell when you are getting sick, study shows | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Wearable sensors that monitor heart rate, activity, skin temperature and other variables can reveal a lot about what is going on inside a person, including the onset of infection, inflammation and even insulin resistance, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. An important component of the ongoing study is to establish a range of normal, or baseline, values for each person in the study and when they are ill. "We want to study people at an individual level," said Michael Snyder, PhD, professor and chair of genetics. Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-wearable-biosensors-flag-illness-lyme.html#jCp

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Mediterranean diet may have lasting effects on brain health

Mediterranean diet may have lasting effects on brain health | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
A new study shows that older people who followed a Mediterranean diet retained more brain volume over a three-year period than those who did not follow the diet as closely. The study is published in the January 4, 2017, onlin

Via Art Jones
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Art Jones's curator insight, January 5, 11:11 AM

There are many words of wisdom that I can still hear my Mom repeat to me over and over again "An apple a day keeps the Dr. away" or "Eat your vegetables before you leave the dinner table" now both of those sayings ring more true because we have scientific proof that eating more fruits and vegetables support brain health.

Thanks Mom!

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Got a chronic disease? There will soon be a prescription app for that

Google DeepMind is already using patient data to help improve treatment, but there are a whole hosts of startups using big data to help doctors treat chronic conditions
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7 major medical breakthroughs of 2016

7 major medical breakthroughs of 2016 | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
From yet another DNA innovation to the discovery of new genes, here are seven of the most important medical breakthroughs of the year:
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Free mobile game can diagnose Alzheimer's in MINUTES

Free mobile game can diagnose Alzheimer's in MINUTES | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
More than 2.4million people around the world have downloaded the free Sea Hero Quest game which tests their ability to navigate a boat around mazes and misty seas in a fictional world.
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Your smartphone may be hurting your sleep

Your smartphone may be hurting your sleep | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Smartphone use is associated with worse quality of sleep in adults, according to a study, especially when they put in screen time just before bed.
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In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says

In five years, machine learning will be a part of every doctor’s job, Vic Gundotra says | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Gundotra, a longtime Microsoft and Google executive, is now the CEO of AliveCor, a mobile health-tech startup.
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Abortion by prescription now rivals surgery for U.S. women

Abortion by prescription now rivals surgery for U.S. women | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Medication abortions accounted for 43 per cent of pregnancy terminations at Planned Parenthood in 2014 - up from 35 per cent in 2010.
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What America Doesn’t Know About Diabetes (Infographic)

What America Doesn’t Know About Diabetes (Infographic) | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
In a Cleveland Clinic — Parade magazine survey, diabetes touched the lives of 53 percent of Americans. While they recognized that diabetes is serious, what they don't understand about its symptoms, risk factors or impact may surprise you.

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Most Americans Are Trying To Lose Weight: Obesity on the Minds of Americans - HealthPopuli.com

Most Americans Are Trying To Lose Weight: Obesity on the Minds of Americans - HealthPopuli.com | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
60% of Americans are currently trying to lose weight. So it shouldn’t be a surprise that when asked, “what’s the most serious health problem in the United States?” Americans say it’s obesity, tied with cancer, and ahead of heart disease and diabetes. Overweight and obesity are top-of-mind for most Americans, according to research conducted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) and NORC at the University of Chicago. This research has created two reports which can be accessed at the link. The survey, conducted among 1,509 consumers in August and September 2016, found that Americans’ understanding of obesity’s risks for chronic disease (namely diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, and cancer) has improved since a similar study was done in 2013. However, there remain misconceptions on how to effectively address the obesity epidemic, posing opportunities to better educate the public on obesity’s role in health and available treatments beyond the peoples’ favorite: diet and exercise. While most consumers agree on the health risks of obesity, many people who are obese do not seek help from the health care system to help them deal with the issue. ASMBS perceives that consumers and the medical profession are on different pages about the condition: that clinicians have reached a consensus that obesity is a disease (cited as such by the AMA in 2013), only one-third of Americans call obesity a disease. Instead, most consumers say obesity is a risk factor for other diseases. Furthermore, people who believe obesity is a lifestyle issue are less likely to talk to a doctor about their weight. Medical consensus among clinicians is that obesity is caused by several factors: behavioral, emotional, environmental, and genetic. But most Americans with obesity tend to believe that obesity is based totally on lifestyle choices, with the main barrier being lack of willpower (perceived by more men than women). One in 3 Americans know someone who died or developed a disease because of obesity. People with such a connection are more likely to call out the severity of obesity and its link to other conditions. These people are more likely to “take weight seriously in their own lives,” the report notes, “more often report talking to a doctor about their own weight” and thinking through the role of weight in other parts of their lives. There’s a Mars/Venus difference in how men see themselves as overweight vs. obese compared with women. About two-thirds of men who are overweight or obese underestimate their weight. Men are less likely to recognize obesity in themselves compared to women: less than half of women who are overweight or obese underestimate their weight, the survey found. In this political season, it’s also interesting to note a party difference on the role of prevention in public policy: while 95% of Democrats and Independents believe something should be done to prevent obesity, only 78% of Republicans support such a prevention policy. Health Populi’s Hot Points:  Most people say “willpower” is the key barrier to dealing with obesity, followed by fair-priced, accessible healthy foods. Nearly 100% of people have tried to lose weight through diet and exercise (on their own): the go-to tactic for weight loss. 78% of people believing diet and exercise are most effective for weight loss. However, this has not been borne out by both individuals’ experience on sustained weight loss as well as an evidence base of clinical research. Most Americans (78%) believe that health insurance should cover losing weight with the help of a doctor through diet or exercise. weight loss surgery (75%), one-on-one dietary counseling (73%), prescription medications (61%), and formal exercise programs (60%). But most people who are obese haven’t yet approached their physicians to discuss these options — whether insurance currently would pay for the various approaches or not. Due to the multi-factor nature of obesity that goes well beyond the norm of diet-and-exercise, closing the chasm between consumers who are obese and their health care providers would be one important strategy to help deal with America’s overweight epidemic. There is compelling research, too, that supports a social role, peer-to-peer support, in weight loss beyond “going it alone” for diet and exercise, detailed in Christakis and Fowler’s work, Connected. In addition, Michele Segar’s research published in her book No Sweat provides compelling research into how people can look at exercise as a gift and not a chore, taking into account the a key barrier to sustaining behavior change. What we know we know through ASMBS and NORC’s two reports is that overweight and obesity are issues that the bulk of Americans, Democrats and Republicans, men and women, think about a lot. The issue is deeply embedded into our popular culture. As the medical system takes on more value-oriented payment, health care providers must bundle into care the social determinants of obesity and overweight — access to nutritious food and places to move around safely and accessibly, insurance coverage for treatment, social care for conversations and counseling, and broadband connectivity to be able to access social networks for peer-to-peer social health.            

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Research team develops portable iPhone-powered lab that can detect cancer with 99% accuracy

Research team develops portable iPhone-powered lab that can detect cancer with 99% accuracy | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
It’s no secret that Apple has ambitious plans for iPhone and Apple Watch in the health industry, but it’s not the only company looking for ways to integrate smartphones in the medical f…
Via Matt Vaidis
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Top 5 forces shaping the future of healthcare

Top 5 forces shaping the future of healthcare | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
PwC ranked healthcare’s most pressing trends, some of which will grow the system, while others are more likely to limit growth.
Via Philippe Marchal
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Growing millennial work force demanding different health benefits

Growing millennial work force demanding different health benefits | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Younger workers are also seeking online access to healthcare providers and health and wellness and information
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Does a healthy diet have to come at a hefty price? 

Does a healthy diet have to come at a hefty price?  | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
A long-held belief has been that healthier foods were more expensive while unhealthier foods were cheaper. Three dietitians explain that health and price don't necessarily correlate.
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100 Best Android Apps of 2017

100 Best Android Apps of 2017 | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Trying to find the Best Android Apps available for Download? Look no further: this up-to-date list has everything you need and more!
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Start the New Year's right with these calories counting apps for Windows phone

Start the New Year's right with these calories counting apps for Windows phone | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Looking for an alternative to MyFitnessPal on Windows phone? Here are a few suggestions to start the New Year's right!
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The Rise of Consumer Health Wearables: Promises and Barriers

The Rise of Consumer Health Wearables: Promises and Barriers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Will consumer wearable technology ever be adopted or accepted by the medical community? Patients and practitioners regularly use digital technology (e.g., thermometers and glucose monitors) to identify and discuss symptoms. In addition, a third of general practitioners in the United Kingdom report that patients arrive with suggestions for treatment based on online search results [1]. However, consumer health wearables are predicted to become the next “Dr Google.” One in six (15%) consumers in the United States currently uses wearable technology, including smartwatches or fitness bands. While 19 million fitness devices are likely to be sold this year, that number is predicted to grow to 110 million in 2018 [2]. As the line between consumer health wearables and medical devices begins to blur, it is now possible for a single wearable device to monitor a range of medical risk factors (Fig 1). Potentially, these devices could give patients direct access to personal analytics that can contribute to their health, facilitate preventive care, and aid in the management of ongoing illness. However, how this new wearable technology might best serve medicine remains unclear.

Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, December 22, 2016 5:59 AM
Les Wearables sont très attendus, mais quid de la fiabilité et de la sécurité des données ?
JEAN PASCAL POISSONNET's curator insight, January 10, 10:43 AM
A comprehensive work on wearables and health particularly to the point, when handling the question : do wearables affect wearers behaviour? The answer seems to be : yes but marginally and not over a long period of time. Promises are better identified in the case of follow up for patients with serious or chronic diseases. Seems to me that patients will more and more make the difference between wearables for well being and wearables that clearly bring an added value where heath stakes are higher. So will doctors.  
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50 things we now know about digital health consumers | Rock Health

50 things we now know about digital health consumers | Rock Health | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
50 things we now know about digital health consumers | Rock Health | We're powering the future of healthcare. Rock Health is a seed and early-stage venture fund that supports startups building the next generation of technologies transforming healthcare. | We're powering the future of healthcare. Rock Health is a seed and early-stage venture fund that supports startups building the next generation of technologies transforming healthcare.

Via Olivier Delannoy
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Olivier Delannoy's curator insight, December 19, 2016 9:35 AM
interesting and fresh facts and data on digital (US) health consumers
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These wearables detect health issues before they happen

These wearables detect health issues before they happen | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Technologies created by the federally funded MD2K project could lead to consumer devices that offer health guidance in real time.
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The Doctor Is In (Your Pocket): How Apps Are Harnessing Music’s Healing Powers

The Doctor Is In (Your Pocket): How Apps Are Harnessing Music’s Healing Powers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The most trusted voice in music.
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Health IT – [Em]Powering Patient Care - Healthcare CommunIT

Health IT – [Em]Powering Patient Care - Healthcare CommunIT | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
When it comes to care, how valuable is health IT to patients and providers? Find out in our NHIT Week infographic examining the tech at the heart of care!

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, Giuseppe Fattori
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Using Telehealth, mHealth to Fight the Flu

Using Telehealth, mHealth to Fight the Flu | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Providers see mHealth, telehealth as virus control tools
Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Why every mum should take away their teens’ phones?

Why every mum should take away their teens’ phones? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Lorraine Candy has taken away her daughter's phones after 9pm. Even though she doesn't think it's unreasonable, they've reacted badly. But she thinks their phones are making them miserable.
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Artificial Intelligence Wants to Make Us Healthier, If We Let It

Artificial Intelligence Wants to Make Us Healthier, If We Let It | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Market opportunities arise as healthcare slowly goes digital
Via Philippe Marchal
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