mHealth- Advances...
Follow
Find
13.8K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by eMedToday
onto mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
Scoop.it!

Pharma mHealth Programs Need Clearer Strategies and Action Plans

“Pharma mHealth Programs Need Clearer Strategies and Action Plans MarketWatch (press release) The study, "Pharmaceutical Mobile Health: Transforming Brand Marketing, Healthcare Communication and Patient Adherence," discovered that companies often...”

eMedToday's insight:

 First, companies need to understand why they want to go mobile. Determining the rationale behind a mobile health strategy is a company's first responsibility when developing an mHealth initiative.

more...
No comment yet.
mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by eMedToday from Pharma Multichannel Marketing
Scoop.it!

Medical Calculators Use Big Data to Help Patients Make Choices

Medical Calculators Use Big Data to Help Patients Make Choices | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Doctors are turning to clinical calculators that crunch big data to help patients make informed medical decisions.


Via Giovanna Marsico, Sven Awege, Stephen Dunn
more...
Denise Silber's curator insight, September 26, 3:09 AM

Thanks to @giomarsi for pointing this out.

 

 
Rescooped by eMedToday from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

Digital Health Ear Thermometer Integrates with Apple HealthKit

Digital Health Ear Thermometer Integrates with Apple HealthKit | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Swaive has developed a digital health smart thermometer that integrates with Apple HealthKit that analyzes temperature and provides critical information.

Via Philippe Loizon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
Scoop.it!

Medical Innovations to Expect by 2064 | HealthWorks Collective

Medical Innovations to Expect by 2064 | HealthWorks Collective | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The Fred Alger Management team reached out to me recently asking what innovative changes I thought the medical and healthcare industry will be going through over the next 50 years. As Yogi Berra famously quipped “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future,” but I thought I’d give it a shot.

Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

An electronic revolution in the doctor's bag

An electronic revolution in the doctor's bag | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Via Philippe Loizon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Health, Digital Health, mHealth, Digital Pharma, hcsm latest trends and news (in English)
Scoop.it!

BlackBerry courting healthcare with Passport phone | mHealthNews

BlackBerry courting healthcare with Passport phone | mHealthNews | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Blackberry's Passport is the latest in a stream of tactics aimed at enterprises. Will its array of cloud, mHealth, patient engagement and supercomputing tools convince healthcare CIOs to give the company another chance?

Via Celine Sportisse
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Checkme: A Medical Tricorder from China's Viatom Technology

Checkme: A Medical Tricorder from China's Viatom Technology | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“Viatom Technology, a company out of Shenzhen, China, received the CE Mark and has released internationally its Checkme health monitor. The device provides (RT @EricTopol: Check Me: Am I Real and Accurate?”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

How biosensors could put a smartphone at the center of 21st-century medical care

How biosensors could put a smartphone at the center of 21st-century medical care | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Biosensors are on the verge of changing the way we use our smartphones to investigate the world around us.

A few years ago, University of Illinois engineer Brian Cunningham hosted an alumnus who’d made a fortune developing one of the earliest iPhone apps. “This person made a gazillion dollars on some trivial game,” he recalled with an incredulous laugh. “I thought, ‘there must be something better you can do with a smartphone.’”

Earlier in his career, after his parents died relatively young and within a few years of each other of lymphoma and prostate cancer, the electrical and computer engineering professor decided to shift his focus from biosensors for military applications like heat-sensing missiles to monitoring one’s health.

“Rather than bombing people, I decided to work on biosensors that could help diagnose disease,” he told me in a recent interview.

Brian Cunningham, University of Illinois

And his meeting with that wealthy game developer would prove to be another game changer. Cunningham gathered a group of students who agreed to volunteer their time for their senior design project developing a cradle and app for the iPhone 4 that would be capable of detecting a wide range of chemical and biological agents.

Their achievement made a big splash, but Cunningham said they’ve already gone well beyond it with additional work, and the future of smartphones that come equipped with built-in biosensors and dedicated cameras could be just a few years away.

To be clear, biosensors have been hot for years now. Sensors currently exist or are being tested for their ability to detect a wide range of targets, including:

gases like methane and sarinexplosives like TNTchemicals like isopropyl alcoholfoodborne bugs like salmonella and listeriaallergens like peanutswater contaminants like lead and pesticidesand infectious diseases like influenza and HIV

But it’s only in the past few years that more scientists have been developing ones that can or will be integrated into smartphones. Cunningham’s cradle, for instance, is in its worst light a clunky piece of extra hardware most people aren’t going to lug around every day. Integrating the sensor into the phone itself, and adding a second camera dedicated to biosensing instead of selfies, is the next step.

Based on the interest Cunningham is getting from phone developers and end users, he predicts this advancement is coming in just two or three years.

 

And then there’s the $10M Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE, which has 10 finalist teams from six countries working to build a “consumer-focused mobile device” that can not only capture five health metrics but also diagnose and interpret 15 different medical conditions. Teams are expected to showcase a range of next-gen biosensors behind their proposed devices when consumer testing begins in 2015. The winner is scheduled to be announced in early 2016.

 

Alex Hsieh, widely known for his work developing a fitness tracker for Atlas Wearables before being snatched up by Apple in June, isn’t so sure. The limiting factor when it comes to integrating all these sensors into gadgets, he said, is power consumption: “In the coming years more and more sensors will be added, whether to phones or watches, but I think the first issue that has to be addressed is power consumption. The more sensors you add on, the more battery draw.”

The wide range of biosensing applications could also act as a deterrent, he added, given people can be overwhelmed by too many choices. “It could take some time to get to a point where it’s useful data for the consumer,” he said. “And as soon as you overload, people start to not care, and that’s a line you should try not to cross.”

Overwhelming or not, the range of coming possibilities is certainly wide, and to people like Cunningham, tantalizing. A new mom could measure BPA levels in her breast milk or lead in her home’s water; a nurse could test for drug-resistant bacteria on the door knobs and light switches of a health clinic; a backpacker could check for contaminants in lake water; a teacher could confirm the absence or presence of peanuts in cafeteria food; a rancher could diagnose infectious disease on a cattle farm; an HIV positive patient could monitor viral load on a regular basis; the list goes on and on.

Here’s a quick snapshot of some of the latest biosensor research that is already adapted or being adapted to smartphones:

Cunningham’s cradle and app to detect a wide range of materialsCell-all sensor sniffs the air to detect toxins and biohazardsSERS substrate for detecting toxins and explosivesMagnetoelastic biosensor to detect foodborne illnessesSmarthpone-ready biosensor that takes its cue from turkeys

In Alex’s world, fitness is king. He acknowledged that his focus may bias him, but he sees the general consumer being most interested in measuring metrics like heart rate and sweat content for day-to-day health and fitness tracking. Testing for things like the flu or allergens have a time and a place, but when it comes to the general consumer, being able to detect things like explosives and gases is way too niche to justify spiking a phone’s battery consumption or overall cost.

How long it takes for biosensors to work their way into the vast majority of smartphones, and exactly what most of them will be used to detect, of course remains to be seen. But as the folks associated with Cell-all wrote: “The goal seems imminently achievable: Just as Bill Gates once envisioned a computer on every desk in every home, so [the Cell-all creator] envisions a chemical sensor in every cell phone in every pocket, purse, or belt holster.”

Related researchSubscriber Content

How the health care industry can benefit from open data

 


Via Alex Butler, ChemaCepeda, dbtmobile
more...
ChemaCepeda's curator insight, September 24, 10:08 AM

Wearables, biosensores, big data, ... Se avecinan tiempos de recogida de millones de datos. ¿Seremos capaces de interpretarlos en el contexto de la salud? ¿Y de traducirlos en una mejor atención sanitaria?

Rescooped by eMedToday from Pharmabook
Scoop.it!

The 7 Most Important Fitness Tracker Measurements

The 7 Most Important Fitness Tracker Measurements | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
How they work and what healthy data looks like

Via Philippe Loizon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

7 Ideas to Create the Best Mobile Website for Your mHealth Company

7 Ideas to Create the Best Mobile Website for Your mHealth Company | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“I recently wrote a blog on why mHealth companies need to develop a mobile strategy.  Now that you are thinking [...] (RT @Modallic: 7 Ideas to Create the Best Mobile Website for your #mHealth Company http://t.co/5KI0MTo4W2)...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Can smartphones really cut it as diagnostic tools? | mHealthNews

Can smartphones really cut it as diagnostic tools? | mHealthNews | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“While the pendulum appears to be swinging in the direction of inexpensive smartphones as sophisticated point-of-care devices, there are reasons to believe it could swing back. (Can smartphones really cut it as diagnostic tools?”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Emergency Medicine Apps

Top 10 Emergency Medicine Apps | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

The following is a list of 10 essential medical apps Emergency Medicine providers should have on their smartphones. Links to iPhone and Android platforms are provided for each app. The apps are listed based on my experiences working in the Emergency Room and the app reviews that have been done prior at iMedicalApps.

1) EMRA PressorDex

An essential tool for Emergency Medicine physicians. This app not only includes information about vasoactive agents, but gives dosing and treatment information for almost every single type of critical care situation that arises.

Price: $16.99
iTunes Link
Android Link: Currently not available — it’s unfortunate EMRA has not created an Android version of their popular critical care handbook.


2) ERres

ERres is the swiss army knife of apps for Emergency Medicine providers. ERres is essential for all physicians who work in the ER setting due to the breadth of content contained. It can be used at the point of care for a wide acuity of conditions.

If there is one app you’re going to download from this list, ERres is going to be the most useful. The only reason it wasn’t the number one app was due to the significant amount of content contained in PressorDex.

Price: $4.99
iMedicalApps Review
iTunes Link
Android Link


12345
Author:
Via Emmanuel Capitaine , dbtmobile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Health issues, not software choices, should be focus when prescribing mHealth apps

Health issues, not software choices, should be focus when prescribing mHealth apps | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
As mobile apps take root within healthcare, one physician says the focus shouldn't be on prescribing apps but helping patients determine what health factors need to be tracked by mHealth apps and devices.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Digital Health in Action - Smartphones Turn into Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tools for mHealth

Digital Health in Action - Smartphones Turn into Point-of-Care Diagnostic Tools for mHealth | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Digital Health is a broad term which encompasses overlapping technology sectors across healthcare—as evidenced by our Venn diagram representing the Digital Health Landscape.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record

Apple's HealthKit Now Sends Medical Data Right to Your Health Record | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

iHealth was the first company to sell a medical device through Apple, so it's only natural it's also the first to fully integrate its products with Apple's HealthKit. That means all the data iHealth's connected monitors and trackers collect not only gets sent straight to the app, it's also automagically logged in your electronic health record.

This is really exciting news. When Apple initially announced the Health app and HealthKit platform, it sounded like the holistic approach to health data we'd been waiting for. The app looked like an ever-evolving, personal electronic health record. Even hospitals were helping design the thing! Of course, anybody who got a sneak peek at the app wondered where exactly the health data was going to come from and how it would get to doctors. Obviously, Apple was thinking about this, too.

So a couple of months ago, Apple approached iHealth to help fully integrate the company's popular suite of connected medical devices into the Health app. In developing the new workflow, iHealth maintained its tradition of making the device experience as simple as possible. That also means that it also needed to be easy to transfer the data between devices and to allow it to be shared. You can manually input data, as well, and which data gets shared is up to you. Indeed, the finished product is downright elegant.


Now, if you've upgraded to iOS 8, you can seamlessly send data from your iHealth devices to the Health app, where you can look at and compare trends over time. If your health care provider uses Epic to manage electronic health records, that data can then go straight to your chart, so your doctors has it at his fingertips next time you go in for a visit. The Health app and HealthKit integration works across all nine of iHealth's medical devices and can collect up to 15 different vital signs.

"Doctors have a more informed view," iHealth CMO Jim Taschetta told Gizmodo in an interview. "They can literally look at data you collected and adjust medication based on that." He added, "I think this is a really important turning point in how digital health monitoring can make a difference. This is an exciting time."

Of course, if your doctor doesn't use Epic for electronic health records, this innovation is probably slightly less exciting. There are other ways to share the data with your doctor, and over time, the HealthKit platform will surely support more hospitals, doctors, and electronic health records systems. Just as iHealth's first connected devices opened up a new category of medical devices so many years ago, this new, deep integration with iOS is only the beginning.

Images via iHealth


Via Alex Butler, Chaturika Jayadewa, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek, dbtmobile
more...
Sandy Williams Spencer's curator insight, September 30, 10:53 AM

This could be so important during a medical event. 

www.free-alzheimers-support.com

Olivia Klenda's curator insight, September 30, 6:50 PM

The new HealthKit is a great way to keep track of your personal health records, exercise, and eating habits. 

Rescooped by eMedToday from Mobile Health: How Mobile Phones Support Health Care
Scoop.it!

The future of healthcare: live-saving innovations for the bottom billion

The future of healthcare: live-saving innovations for the bottom billion | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
From India to Mexico, meet the innovators in open-heart surgery and palliative care developing unconventional health solutions Many of the most radical health innovations, that will improve the lives of hundreds of millions of people, will come...

Via Emmanuel Capitaine , dbtmobile
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare? - NASDAQ

Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare? - NASDAQ | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
NASDAQ
Apple vs. Google: Which Tech Giant Will Conquer Healthcare?
NASDAQ
By comparison, Google has taken an industry-straddling approach to healthcare, expanding into biotech, medical devices, and mobile health at the same time.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

3 Fascinating Ventures Leading the Preventive Health Revolution

Today’s healthcare problem is one of the most multi-faceted, and central to the biggest challenges of the modern world.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

iHealth of Tianjin Raises $25 Million for Mobile Health Monitoring - ChinaBio® Today

iHealth of Tianjin Raises $25 Million for Mobile Health Monitoring - ChinaBio® Today | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“iHealth, a Tianjin company that makes smartphone-compatible health monitoring device devices, received a $25 million capital investment from Xiaomi Ventures, a China electronics company.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Wireless Access for Health Project on shortlist for Secretary of State’s Office of Global Partnerships Award

Wireless Access for Health Project on shortlist for Secretary of State’s Office of Global Partnerships Award | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“A testament to how mobile connectivity can benefit communities at large.”
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from mHealth marketing
Scoop.it!

Drive mHealth Sales with Social Media

Drive mHealth Sales with Social Media | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Does Social Media truly drive  mHealth sales? There seems to be differing opinions about the ROI effectiveness of Social Media. Email Still [...]

Via Sam Stern
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

The ROI Of Mobile Apps For Your Healthcare Clients - Business Solutions Magazine

The ROI Of Mobile Apps For Your Healthcare Clients - Business Solutions Magazine | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“EmpowHerThe ROI Of Mobile Apps For Your Healthcare ClientsBusiness Solutions MagazineMobile apps might be a hard sell for your clients, but an added benefit of cost reduction is sure to get even the most reluctant customer interested.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Mobile Integrated Nurse Manager - RN

Mobile Integrated Nurse Manager - RN | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
“JOBS/TEXAS: Mobile Integrated Nurse Manager - RN: Evolution Health - Dallas, TX - Job DescriptionJob Title: Mo... http://t.co/G2nttRsznd”;
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by eMedToday from Digital Marketing for Pharma
Scoop.it!

Dartmouth's StudentLife app can tell you if your mental health is hurting your grades

Dartmouth's StudentLife app can tell you if your mental health is hurting your grades | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Not sure if you're depressed? Your smartphone may be able to clue you in. Researchers at Dartmouth have developed an Android app that keeps tabs on

Via Julie O'Donnell
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Why do docs think mHealth is useless for patient monitoring?

Physicians are still not sold on the benefits of mHealth to truly improve patient health, according to a new survey by Deloitte. (Why do docs think #mHealth is useless for #PatientMonitoring?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by eMedToday
Scoop.it!

Essilor to Launch a Mobile App to Inform Consumers About Eye Health and Encourage Eye Exams

Essilor to Launch a Mobile App to Inform Consumers About Eye Health and Encourage Eye Exams | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
LAS VEGAS—
Essilor of America announced yesterday that it is launching a mobile application that addresses what the company sees as a rising demand by consumers for timely, reliable eyecare information online.
more...
No comment yet.