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'The web is dead - and the app killed it'

'The web is dead - and the app killed it' | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Combined with apps, the newer, nimbler mobile net is making the internet a far more useful place

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eMedToday's insight:

One reason we're using apps instead of the web is that we are mobile. The other reason is even more important: we're suffering from information overload. Despite all the talk of " big data", too much of it is hard to digest. The brain evolved in a world of limited information; abundance causes havoc. There is simply too much on the internet and, although the web excels at finding information, it does a poor job of filtering it.


 

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eMedToday's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:07 AM

Pharma need to think apps. Here is why and why e detailing needs to be done on an mobile app.

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Providers warming up to mobile health devices

Providers warming up to mobile health devices | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Electronic health records (EHR) cannot stand alone, say researchers in a PwC report. While the number of providers integrating smartphones and tablets into their EHR collection system has risen, there's still a long way to go.

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Jenna Collins's comment, March 25, 11:28 AM

Using electronic records is so much more efficient than the old style of millions of folders and files. While it is much easier to search and find specific files electronically, there is also the possibility of losing records or being hacked.
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A Primer on mHealth Applications

A Primer on mHealth Applications | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

SOURCE March 23, 2015 Described as “the convergence of the digital and genetics revolutions with health and healthcare," digital health captured over $4 billion in venture capital investment in 2014.


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Fitness tracker device revenue to reach $5.4B by 2019

Fitness tracker device revenue to reach $5.4B by 2019 | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

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Poll shows all ages seek digital health tools

Poll shows all ages seek digital health tools | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Millennials and baby boomers have a lot of common a desire for technology that supports health priorities.

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Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study

Acceptance Factors of Mobile Apps for Diabetes by Patients Aged 50 or Older: A Qualitative Study | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
A lack of additional benefits and ease of use emerged as the key factors for the acceptance of diabetes apps among patients aged 50 or older

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Apple Launches ResearchKit Platform With 5 mHealth Apps

Apple Launches ResearchKit Platform With 5 mHealth Apps | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Apple announced a new open source software framework called ResearchKit designed for medical and health research with five inaugural mobile health apps.
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KAIST Makes Platform for Integrating Mobile Health Care Techs

KAIST Makes Platform for Integrating Mobile Health Care Techs | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has built a platform that combines mobile and health care technologies, and will test its mobile health care service with 100 students.  KAIST announced on March 12 that it has...
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Apple updates developer guidelines for medical research apps

Apple updates developer guidelines for medical research apps | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The move comes after the company unveiled a developer framework to create apps for medical research

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Gas-sniffing pills could help diagnose gut diseases

Gas-sniffing pills could help diagnose gut diseases | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Researchers say they've found a way to sniff out health trouble from the inside

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Art Jones's curator insight, March 16, 5:05 PM

"The concept of a pill that does more than deliver medicine has already been proven to be useful. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the PillCam, a miniature camera a patient swallows that takes images inside the intestinal tract, as a less invasive alternative to colonoscopy."

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Consumers to improve wellness through wearables

Consumers to improve wellness through wearables | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
SOURCE March 13, 2015 Smartphone owners expect quantifying and regulating stress will increase life expectancy by two years Quantification of such behaviors today starts with wearables. However, those who are very satisfied with their wellness need both style and function: 55 percent say product design is important, while 59 percent buy technology devices to fulfill specific needs With 62 percent interested in a microclimate monitor, wellness also entails understanding societal health hazards. Interest in wellness on a personal level may therefore inspire transformation on a societal level Ericsson (NASDAQ:ERIC) today published its latest report from Ericsson ConsumerLab, entitled Living longer: wellness and the internet. This report examines how satisfied consumers are with their overall wellness, and how it relates to their use of the internet for health and fitness purposes. The report draws together data from several recent consumer surveys covering up to 49 countries.

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Google’s Mobile-Friendly Notice: A Dire Warning for Healthcare Websites

Google’s Mobile-Friendly Notice: A Dire Warning for Healthcare Websites | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Google’s changes mean that the search rankings could be at serious risk for websites that don’t meet the mobile-friendly requirements.

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Alexandre Gultzgoff's curator insight, March 16, 9:01 AM
a must-read article before designing a new spmsd website
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Health Data Consortium head spotlights startups making use of open health data

Health Data Consortium head spotlights startups making use of open health data | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The executive director of the Health Data Consortium highlighted some of the companies he thinks are overcoming some of the barriers to making health data more widely available and useful...

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Apple's Research Kit "Diagnostic Tool": Will FDA Send Apple a Warning Letter?

Apple's Research Kit "Diagnostic Tool": Will FDA Send Apple a Warning Letter? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

Apple Inc.’s new ResearchKit software platform turns the iPhone into a diagnostic tool drawing medical data from millions of potential customers, creating a boon for researchers and a headache for privacy advocates.  Just how viable is this announcement and is it more sizzle than steak?

 

The platform, which will be available on the latest version of iPhone software next month, will allow any iPhone user to enroll in tests of new drugs and therapies by downloading apps from hospitals and providers who are recruiting patients. Hardware already available on the iPhone, like the voice recorder and motion sensor, will then be used to measure health outcomes — everything from steps taken to testing whether someone’s voice patterns are indicative of Parkinson’s disease. It works with HealthKit, which Apple introduced last year.

 

ResearchKit joins health-tracking technology tools such as Fitbit Inc.’s wristwear that can generate reams of data on people’s health and activity levels. While researchers are enthusiastic about having access to such information culled from a diverse population, privacy advocates are concerned the information could be tied to individual users.  ResearchKit’s uses would cross into areas where the privacy protections of the HIPAA law are not always present.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 11, 8:59 AM


During Apple's presentation, Tim

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Built By A Parkinson’s Sufferer, MyHealthPal Tracks Symptoms, Creates Research Data

Built By A Parkinson’s Sufferer, MyHealthPal Tracks Symptoms, Creates Research Data | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The development and availability of wearables is running hand in hand with the exploding interest in the digital health space. Managing our health via apps..

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Sarah Palmer's curator insight, March 27, 12:40 PM

#innovate #healthcare

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Apple’s ResearchKit: Can apps take medical research to the next level?

Apple’s ResearchKit: Can apps take medical research to the next level? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Apple's ResearchKit is aimed at medical research SOURCE March 25, 2015 These days, apps are ubiquitous as tools to improve health and fitness. But Apple thinks it can do more than that and even take medical research to a new level, thanks to its power to crowdsource subjects in clinical tests and monitoring studies. Can the company's recently-announced ResearchKit, an open source software framework for researchers, be the medical study game changer that it's aiming to be? Strength in numbers The first thing that comes to mind with ResearchKit is the sheer quantity of information the studies will be able to amass. A vast range of data can be accessed from the Health app, such as weight, blood pressure and glucose levels. Apple introduced the HealthKit software framework with iOS 8 so developers could design health and fitness apps that can communicate with each other. ResearchKit can access even more data such as gait, motor impairment, speech and memory through hardware such as the

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Watch the skies: ambulance drones bringing AED CPR, medical supplies, and more

Watch the skies: ambulance drones bringing AED CPR, medical supplies, and more | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Ambulance drones that can deliver vital medical supplies and “on screen” instructions.

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Atari steps into fitness with health app launch, partners with Walgreens | mobihealthnews

Atari steps into fitness with health app launch, partners with Walgreens | mobihealthnews | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

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Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health?

Could Video Games Be Used To Improve Youth Health? | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Video games can sometimes be associated with a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy weight gain.  A new study led by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS) suggests that certain games could...

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Emlyn Davies-Cole's curator insight, March 24, 10:36 AM

Video games just as good as any other Physical Education activity.

Justin Tu's curator insight, March 25, 11:36 PM

Daniel. T,  2013, 'Could Video Games be Used to Improve Youth Health?', Article of Forbes. 

Daniel explains in this article that E-games could provide more exercise than physical education for kids in middle school. The author provides that the studies from George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services demonstrate the ability in using video games to provide an attractive energy-burning P.E.. Their research focuses on 'Exer-games', where middle school students get on the video game 'Dance Dance Revolution' and has proven to burn more calories over traditional P.E. activities. The article is useful, it provides details on how video games benefit people's fitness, however the main limitation is that Daniel's article does not provide studies or information on how this affects adult fitness through video games. It'll be further researched to discover whether video games can be a useful alternative way of exercise. 

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From Google to New Reimbursement Models, Digital Health Trends for 2015

From Google to New Reimbursement Models, Digital Health Trends for 2015 | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

There is no question that 2014 was an exciting and eventful year for digital health. Even with all of the advancements and innovations in 2014, this year promises to be even better. The growth in business cases for new models of healthcare delivery and integration of digital health technology is reaching the point of convergence — creating powerful synergies where there was once only data silos and skepticism.

Maybe we have not quite achieved this synergy yet, but the trends emerging in 2015 will move the industry much closer to the long-awaited initiatives in connected, value-based care.. To understand the convergence that is taking place in digital health, we need to examine the key emerging trends in technology, healthcare and business.

Technology

 Connecting to Smart Clinical Devices

Technology has advanced to the point that we are constantly hyper-connected to a variety of networks and devices. We have handheld diagnostic tools on our person continuously generating an astounding amount of data.

The types of health devices that are connectable and disseminating data are rapidly changing. Tools are emerging like flash thermometers that do not require physical touch, which diminish contamination risks, and smart EpiPen casings that automatically alert medical professionals during an allergic reaction.

These devices are not only becoming less expensive, but they are also starting to be reimbursable by insurers. Thus, over time these devices will replace traditional, non-connected products. Clinical devices are increasingly designed as Bluetooth-enabled, allowing for the real time collection of patient data, and providing better access and outcomes for patients.


 Wiser Wearables

Wearables will continue to enter the market, but their features and focus will go well beyond fitness. Even the devices entering the market now are more sophisticated than ever before. Some are now equipped with tools like muscle activity tracking, EGG, breath monitoring, and UV light measurement.

It will be fascinating to watch how consumer electronics, wearables, and clinical devices continue to take new forms. Some particularly interesting examples will be in the categories of digital tattoos, implantable devices, and smart lenses. As the adoption of wearables continues to grow, we will see more value placed on accessing digital health data by healthcare organizations. This will be especially important as health organizations move to value-based models of care. The need to gain access to the actionable data on such devices will only grow as innovation creates more complex technologies in the market.

Incentivized Consumer Adoption & Data Sharing

As these new devices enter the market, consumer adoption will continue to flourish. Right now, nearly 70 percent of U.S adults track their health or the health of a loved one in some way. And, more than half of US consumers have used some sort of fitness technology in the last year. It is projected that 112 million wearable devices will be shipped by 2018, with most of that activity taking place in 2016. This means a huge ramp up for device sales and adoption in 2015.

The adoption of wearable devices has grown exponentially. The trend started with health enthusiasts, such as runners tracking steps, location, and heart rate. Today, there is widespread adoption by all types of consumers. People are even being incentivized to use wearables by outside groups, such as insurance companies, healthcare providers, and employers.

Nine out of 10 employees want their company to provide a wearable device for incentivized tracking, and more than half of those individuals believe fitness trackers will help them be more active. As a result, insurance companies are starting to undertake proactive approaches to the adoption of mobile. For example, Oscar Health Insurance recently partnered with Misfit to provide financial incentives for fitness activities logged with an activity tracker.

This year, new innovations in both clinical and consumer devices will generate different and relevant types of health data. These mobile health technologies are already crossing from the consumer sphere into the clinical sphere. Hospitals are using patient-generated data to monitor patients post-discharge and reduce the risk of re-admittance. Health systems are devising new ways to monitor and manage their populations through engagement portals and analytics programs

Access to new types of actionable and applicable health data is making a substantial impact across all segments of healthcare. Pharmaceutical companies and clinical research organizations are using data to more accurately monitor clinical trials and conduct research studies. Employers and payers are using data to develop more engaging incentives around physical activity and healthy lifestyles. The list goes on, and so does the potential.

 Telehealth  Extending the Point of Care

This is the year the promise of telehealth will be realized. It is projected that by 2018, 65 percent of interactions with health organizations will take place via mobile devices. Those statistics speak to the need of satisfying the growing demands being placed on providers, along with the growing discernment among patients when it comes to selecting affordable and convenient medical services. The continued adoption of telehealth will extend the point of care for providers and provide ubiquitous access to medical professionals for patients.

A number of entities are already putting this into practice: Walgreens, in partnership with MDLIVE, recently expanded their mobile platform to offer virtual doctors visits for acutely-ill patients; Google is testing a HIPAA-compliant medicine platform for video chats with doctors; and, digital urgent care solutions like Doctors on Demand are growing in popularity due to their convenience and low cost.



Via Technical Dr. Inc.
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EmmanuelGrunenberger's curator insight, March 18, 6:05 AM

 More Wearable Wiser devices and more Data Sharing: #DigitalHealth Trends for 2015. As an example 70% of US adults are using #Healthcare #ConnectedDevice.

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The danger to online health seekers

The danger to online health seekers | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it

POST SUMMARY: According to the Pew Internet Project, 72 percent of US internet users look up health-related information online. But an astonishing number of the pages we visit to learn about private health concerns—confidentially, we assume—are tracking our queries, sending the sensitive data to third party corporations, even shipping the information directly to the same brokers who monitor our credit scores. It’s happening for profit, for an “improved user experience,” and because developers have flocked to “free” plugins and tools provided by data-vacuuming companies.

In April 2014, Tim Libert, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania, custom-built software calledwebXray to analyze the top 50 search results for nearly 2,000 common diseases (over 80,000 pages total). He found the results startling: a full 91 percent of the pages made what are known as third-party requests to outside companies. That means when you search for “cold sores,” for instance, and click the highly ranked “Cold Sores Topic Overview WebMD” link, the website is passing your request for information about the disease along to one or more (and often many, many more) other corporations.

According to Libert’s research, which is published in the Communications of the ACM, about 70 percent of the time, the data transmitted “contained information exposing specific conditions, treatments, and diseases.” That, he says, is “potentially putting user privacy at risk.” And it means you’ll probably want to think twice before looking up medical information on the internet.

This puts users are risk for two significant reasons: first, people’s health interests may be publicly identified along with their names. This could happen because criminals get a hold of the information, it is accidentally leaked, or data brokers collect and sell the information. Second, many online marketers use algorithmic tools which automatically cluster people into groups with names like “target” and “waste.” Predictably, those in the “target” category are extended favorable discounts at retailers and advance notice of sales. Given that 62 percent of bankruptcies are the result of medical expenses, it is possible anyone visiting medical websites may be grouped into the “waste” category and denied favorable offers.

Personal health information — historically protected by the Hippocratic Oath — has suddenly become the property of private corporations who may sell it to the highest bidder or accidentally misuse it to discriminate against the ill,” Libert said. “As health information seeking has moved online, the privacy of a doctor’s office has been traded in for the silent intrusion of behavioral tracking.”

Online privacy has for some time been a concern. Studies conducted by Annenberg dating back to 1999 indicate wariness among Americans about how their personal information may be used. And slightly more than one in every three Americans even knows that private third-parties can track their visits to health-related websites.



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Dr Martin Wale's curator insight, March 19, 1:07 AM

Interesting and troubling account of the perils of searching for health information on line. It's probably safe to assume that information about what you're searching for, or even contact information is being collected for sale or marketing.

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Infographic: SXSW Health Tech Trends - HIT Consultant

Infographic: SXSW Health Tech Trends - HIT Consultant | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Phillips illustrates how data, connectivity and innovation are changing the healthcare landscape, as well as the key health tech trends throughout this year

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Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health

Top 10 Companies Pushing Innovation In Digital Health | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
There are many reasons why the digital technologies hope to improve patient care as well as the state of healthcare itself. They include improving efficiencies, patient safety, and cost. We selecte...

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How ResearchKit can blow past hype and be the next big thing

How ResearchKit can blow past hype and be the next big thing | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
I don’t like hyperbole in healthcare marketing. I also was skeptical when Apple introduced its consumer-centric HealthKit platform last summer. But this week’s announcement of ResearchKit by the Cupertino, California-based...

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Creative Review: Your health in your hands

Creative Review: Your health in your hands | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
The best in visual communication

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Thousands Sign Up for Medical Study Apps on Apple's ResearchKit - iHealthBeat

Thousands Sign Up for Medical Study Apps on Apple's ResearchKit - iHealthBeat | mHealth- Advances, Knowledge and Patient Engagement | Scoop.it
Mobile applications designed to run on Apple's newly released ResearchKit -- an open-source software platform that allows researchers to collect health data through consenting iPhone users -- have seen strong demand, but some experts are advising researchers to proceed with caution. Modern Healthcare, Bloomberg Business.

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