Mexico, Ryan Crotts
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Google Image Result for http://www.cancunwonders.com/weblog/wp-content/uploads/bullfights-mexican-traditions-cancun.jpg

I think the bull chasing is cool too.

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Mexico Forecast

Mexico Forecast | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

The weather in Mexico right now is mild. It is somewhat cloudy and very nice temperatures. They don't get much rain right now. It is on average about 72 degrees for the high. It is on average of about 42 degrees for the low.

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Mexico's Day of the Dead

Day of the dead is a very important holiday in Mexico. It is to honor the dead. They make many foods for their ancestors. They make alters to put offerings to the dead on. It is also a celebration of life.

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Answer to: What are Mexico's largest industries and the products they manufacture?

Answer to: What are Mexico's largest industries and the products they manufacture? | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

Mexicos major industry is construction. They also make a lot of metalic products. These two things give mexico a lot of jobs. They also ship these goods all over the world. These industries bring in a lot of money to mexico.

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Mexican Food

Mexico has a very many different types of food. They are known for the taco. Mexico has many festivals where they cook food. They are also known for their chili. Mexico also grows many foods such as pineapple.

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Mexico Government type

Mexico Government type | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

Mexico is a federal republic. A federal republic is when the powers of the central government are restricted and in which the component parts (states, colonies, or provinces) retain a degree of self-government. Ultimate sovereign power rests with the voters who chose their governmental representatives.

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Exchange Rate

Exchange Rate | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

The mexican dollar is called a peso. 1 US dollar equals 12.9 Mexican dollars. You can exchange your money at any bank in Mexico City. Their money is very different. You can also change your money at an airport.

 

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Area

Area | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

The area of Mexico is 1,958,200 square kilometers or 761,606 square miles. Mexico is the 15th largest country in the world. Mexico is roughly the size of Spain. It has a various terain. Mexico is bordered by the US and Central America.

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Flag of Mexico

The flag of Mexico (Spanish: Bandera de México) is a vertical tricolor of green, white, and red with the national coat of arms charged in the center of the white stripe. While the meaning of the colors has changed over time, these three colors were adopted by Mexico following independence from Spain during the country's War of Independence, and subsequent First Mexican Empire. The current flag was adopted in 1968, but the overall design has been used since 1821, when the First National Flag was created. The current law of national symbols, Law on the National Arms, Flag, and Anthem, that governs the use of the national flag has been in place since 1984.

Red, white, and green are the colors of the national liberation army in Mexico. The central emblem is the Aztec pictogram for Tenochtitlan (now Mexico City), the center of their empire. It recalls the legend that inspired the Aztecs to settle on what was originally a lake-island. The form of the coat of arms was most recently revised in 1968. A ribbon in the national colors is at the bottom of the coat of arms. Throughout history, the flag has changed four times, as the design of the coat of arms and the length-width ratios of the flag have been modified. However, the coat of arms has had the same features throughout: an eagle, holding a serpent in its talon, is perched on top of a prickly pear cactus; the cactus is situated on a rock that rises above a lake. The coat of arms is derived from an Aztec legend that their gods told them to build a city where they spot an eagle on a nopal eating a serpent, which is now Mexico City. The current national flag, the Fourth National Flag, is also used as the Mexican naval ensign by ships registered in Mexico.

Before the addition of the first national flag, people flags used during the War of Independence from Spain had a great influence on the design of the first national flag. It was never adopted as an official flag, but many historians consider the first Mexican flag to be the Standard of the Virgin of Guadalupe, which was carried by Miguel Hidalgo during the Grito de Dolores on September 16, 1810.[1] The Standard became the initial symbol of the rebel army during the Mexican War of Independence. Various other Standards were used during the war. José María Morelos used a flag with an image of the Virgin to which was added a blue and white insignia with a crowned eagle on a cactus over a three-arched bridge and the letters V.V.M. (Viva la Virgen María – "long live the Virgin Mary").[1] The Revolutionary Army also used a flag featuring the colors white, blue and red in vertical stripes. The first use of the actual colors—green, white and red—was in the flag of the unified Army of the Three Guarantees (pictured above) after independence from Spain was won.[2]

Red, white and green are the colors of liberation in Mexico. The central emblem is the Aztec pictogram for Tenochtitlan. This flag was adopted when Mexico gained independence from Spain. The overall design has been in place since 1821. The current flag is used on ships registered to Mexico.

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Mexico City, Mexico

Mexico City, Mexico | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

Mexico is a farely large country of about 761,603 square miles. Their main language is spanish. Mexico is made up of 31 states. Mexico is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean. Mexico is also bordered by Texas.

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Mexico Attractions

Some of the most famous mexican attractions are the aztec pyramids. They are visited by many people each year. People also go to see the beaches of mexico. They also look at the temples. Many people each year visit mexico to see the tourist attrations.

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Famous Mexicans

Diego Rivera is important for his paintings. He is known for many of his paintings. The people loved his art. His painting are in many buldings in mexico. his paintings are still loved today.

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timeline

Mexico become independent from Spain from 1810-1821. There are many different tribes in mexico. Many people in Mexico can trace their ancestors. The Aztecs have been around for a long time. There are many artifacts in Mexico.

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Mexico Agriculture/crop

  Domestically, the most important crops for consumption purposes are wheat, beans, corn, and sorghum. Mexico is really known for their diverse agriculture. The do a lot of farming. The most important crops for export purposes are sugar, coffee, fruits, and vegetables. They rely heavily on their agriculture.

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Religions - Mexico

Religions - Mexico | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

According to the 2000 census, about 88% of the Mexican population is at least nominally affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church. About 6% are Protestant. Christian denominations represented include Presbyterians, Jehovah's  Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventists, Mormons, Lutherans, Methodists,  Baptists, and Anglicans. There are many churches in Mexico.

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Mexico - literacy rate

Mexico - literacy rate | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

Literacy rate, youth female (% of females ages 15-24) in Mexico was 98.38 as of 2009. Its highest value over the past 29 years was 98.38 in 2009, while its lowest value was 90.86 in 1980. Literacy rate, youth male (% of males ages 15-24) in Mexico was 98.67 as of 2009. Its highest value over the past 29 years was 98.67 in 2009, while its lowest value was 93.09 in 1980. Literacy rate, adult female (% of females ages 15 and above) in Mexico was 92.12 as of 2009.

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President of Mexico

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The President of the United Mexican States (Spanish: Presidente de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos)[2] is the head of state and government of Mexico. Under the Constitution, the president is also the Supreme Commander of the Mexican armed forces. The current President is Felipe Calderón, elected in 2006, with a term that ends on December 1, 2012. The president-elect is Enrique Peña Nieto, the winner of the 2012 Presidential election held on July 1, 2012.

Currently, the office of the President is considered to be revolutionary, in that it is the inheritor[clarification needed] of the Mexican Revolution and the powers of office are derived from the Revolutionary Constitution of 1917. Another legacy of the Revolution is its ban on re-election. Mexican presidents are limited to a single six-year term, called a sexenio. No one who has held the post, even on a caretaker basis, is allowed to run or serve again. The constitution and the office of the President closely follow the presidential system of government.

The current President is Felipe Calderon, elected in 2006. His term ends on December 1, 2012. Currently, the office of the President is considered to be revolutionary. Mexican presidents are limited to a single six-year term. No one who has held the post, even on a caretaker basis, is allowed to run or serve again.

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Population and Racial Demographics

Mexico has a population of 112,336,538. They are mostly spanish speaking people. It is very densely populated. There isnt many english speaking people in Mexico. Mecico also has a percentage of black people.

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Mexico Map

Mexico Map | Mexico, Ryan Crotts | Scoop.it

Mexico is located in North America. It is the 13th largest country in the world. it is bordered by three bodies of water, the Pacific Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico. It has a very high climate. Mexico covers a total are of 761,606 square miles.

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