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The Geography of Drug Trafficking

The Geography of Drug Trafficking | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Web Site... 

 

Afghanistan and Burma (a.k.a.-Myanmar) are the world's leading producers of the illicit narcotic of heroin.  What environmental, political, developmental and cultural factors play a role in these distribution networks?  What geographic factors contribution to the production of these drugs to be located in these particular places?  Follow the link for a map of global cocaine distribution patterns.   


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 5, 2012 7:44 PM
Favorable environmental factors such as mountainous terrain, helps isolate and conceal these regions which creates conditions that makes the production of heroin and cocaine easier. Since you can’t conquer the environment, the best alternative may be further international cooperation to hinder drug trafficking and production.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 7:54 AM
The second half of this article shows just how crucial of a part Mexico plays in the drug trade. Most of the cocaine that comes from the Andean region is pushed up through Mexico and the Carribean only 17 tons are sold in Mexico while 165 tons are distributed into the United States. The US makes up 40% of global cocaine consumption, leaving a huge opportunity open to Mexico.
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Latest battlefield in Mexico's drug war: Social media

Latest battlefield in Mexico's drug war: Social media | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Twitter users report gun battles and fiery road blockades. A website lists victims' names and details of how they died. A blog posts gory photos of gruesome killings and videos of drug lords' confessions.

 

Result of anti drug cartel social media interaction.

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Colombia - DRUGS AND SOCIETY

This outlines the begining of the Columbian drug problem. They sought to be the global leaders in drugs, and fairly so succeeded for a short period of time. The US response is what forced them to settle down and find alternet ways of doing business.

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Mexican Drug Cartels Using Drones To Scout Border Crossings?

Mexican Drug Cartels Using Drones To Scout Border Crossings? | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Drones have become almost an everyday part of life now (not the kind Mark Levin speaks of - the robotic flying kind!

 

 

A wonderful technology for us to have and use. Potentially saving lives every time one is deployed rather then a scouting unit. The down side, quite litteraly, is the possibility of one of our drones falling into the hands of a cartel. Reproduction would be fairly easy with the seemingly unlimited amount of money they possess. It would not be hard for them to turn our own weapon against us.

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Gabby and Kamri's curator insight, November 21, 2013 10:17 AM

We chose this article for economy, because it talks about advancement in drone technology.

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Americas MexicoBlog: Mexican drug cartels try to establish direct ...

Americas MexicoBlog: Mexican drug cartels try to establish direct ... | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Las Vegas Sun: Jackie Valley. Mexican cartels are working to establish a direct foothold in Las Vegas to sell drugs here and use the region as a stepping stone to shipping large quantities of drugs to the East, law enforcement ...

 

 

 

Just some quick facts in the full article on the amount of drugs that are sold. It also brings the problem closer to home, showing that cartels are selling heavily in the Nevada, Callifornia areas.

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Central America's bloody drug problem - CNN.com

Central America's bloody drug problem - CNN.com | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
For the residents of Honduras and Guatemala, success isn't overtaking the drug cartels -- it's learning how to peacefully coexist.
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 5, 2012 10:11 AM
A slight basis for the origins of the drug problem in Central America
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Mapping Mexico's gang violence

Mapping Mexico's gang violence | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Voters are counting on the next president to find a solution to the country's alarming rise in organised crime.

 

This map shows the violence is most intense close to the US border and on costal areas with ports. Possibly because they are key areas for smuggling and due to heightened securiy there is more conflict.

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The US-Mexico border: where the drugs war has soaked the ground blood red

The US-Mexico border: where the drugs war has soaked the ground blood red | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
The border between Mexico and the United States is chaotically reverting to historical type, the place of horror it was for most of the 19th and 20th centuries.
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 27, 2012 9:44 AM
With so many internally corrupt, how could one hope to fight this war? The new president has announced many plans with the intentions of putting a stop to this violence. To have any hope of a win he may have to do a complete overhaul of his staff, along with the US border agents.
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Mexico's Drug Wars - Photo Essays

Mexico's Drug Wars - Photo Essays | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Photographer Anthony Suau documents the surging influence of the drug cartels in Northern Mexico and the efforts by police to maintain law and order...
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Kim Vignale's comment, August 12, 2012 11:06 AM
The Mexican drug trade is a serious and dangerous issue that is happening today. This project shed light on how dangerous it is. I realize that even the important officials are bribed by the drug dealers so nobody can be trusted. It is scary that the drug runs are done by young innocent people. Unfortunately, many people die if they speak up for what is right.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 4, 9:37 AM

Anthony Suau photographs images that tell a thousand words of the drug wars and its influences. Drug trafficking is a major issue in Mexico and due to this, govenment has increased its actions, prostitution has increased as well as the death rate. It is one thing to read about these incidents, but it is another to see them. Military search through bags and pull people thrown into canals out.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:39 AM

This picture depicts the drug trade and how well it is or isnt regulated. Many officials are nervous about the drug trafficing and do not feel confident in enforcing the laws against drug cartel and drug trafficing. This photography depicts the efforts ofd the police to maintain order.

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Mexico's New Strategy To Counter Drug Violence?

Mexico's New Strategy To Counter Drug Violence? | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
BOGOTA, Colombia — The top security adviser for Mexico's next president said Friday that he is recommending the creation of elite units of police and troops who will target not just major drug traffickers but also lower-level cartel hitmen as a way...
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 25, 2012 4:32 PM
This new counter-cartel team may be a step in the right direction. The retired columbian police officer who reccomended the force, has delt with the problem from the source for years. As the President elect is indicating, hitting the smaller gangs and middle men would deplete the drug bosses of their resources. As Lozoya says in the article, "The best weapons against organized crime and insecurity is jobs," If Mexico were to focus more on agriculture and infrastructure, that would boost their economy as well as create jobs. With plenty of jobs available, the people of Mexico will not be forced to turn to drug pushing, or selling as quickly, eliminating replacements fo those they that have been taken out or arrested.
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In Monterrey, Mexico, a culture of fear is evident

Javier Guzman, a 25-year-old industrial engineer, eased his SUV toward the curb on a recent Sunday as a masked state police officer in the middle of the road signaled him to pull over. Guzman...
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Mexico drug war displaces families in Sinaloa highlands

Mexico drug war displaces families in Sinaloa highlands | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
CULIACAN, Mexico — For generations, the extended Hernandez family tended fields of marijuana high in Sinaloa's western Sierra Madre highlands.

 

 

In 2011 160,00 Mexicans were displaced from their homes due to the violence.

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Would Legalizing Marijuana in Washington Put Mexican Drug Cartels Out of Business? - Seattle News - The Daily Weekly

Would Legalizing Marijuana in Washington Put Mexican Drug Cartels Out of Business? - Seattle News - The Daily Weekly | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
The ballot initiative to legalize, tax, and sell marijuana for recreational use in Washington was the subject of a...
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Enrique Pena Nieto of the PRI Wins Mexico's Presidential Election

Enrique Pena Nieto of the PRI Wins Mexico's Presidential Election | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
In an entirely expected but still somehow improbable election result, Mexico voted the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) back into power yesterday.
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 5:49 AM
With Nieto's stance on the drug war, i personally disagree with the editors opinion that it will be a return to the old PRI way of corruption and "drug lord police" The president elect has been very adamant about trying to quell the widespread violence and chaos that has been occurring. He has stated that he wishes to strengthen ties with the US government to try and deal with the drug cartel issue. As long as he follows through on his set direction he could be the leader Mexico is longing for.
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The Business - Colombian Traffickers | Drug Wars | FRONTLINE | PBS

The Business - Colombian Traffickers | Drug Wars | FRONTLINE | PBS | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it

The end of the columbian cartels through a show of force from the authorities. The fall of these key cartels, opened up the door for the Mexican cartels to move in and dominate the market. Today they make up 90% of all drugs trafficed to the US.

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The pure heroin so potent it can kill before users even take the needles from their arms - available for just £7

The pure heroin so potent it can kill before users even take the needles from their arms - available for just £7 | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Drug smugglers are selling the ‘black tar’ substance for as little as £7 ($10) a bag, raising concerns that its cost will widen its appeal with addicts.

 

 

A quick look at Black tar heroin. This drug is much cheaper to produce then regular heroin and is usually availble for a cheap price to get people addicted.

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“Top Undercover Cop” on CIA's Control of the Drug Trade « The ...

“Top Undercover Cop” on CIA's Control of the Drug Trade « The ... | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
In late July a top Mexican government official made headlines around the world by accusing the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) of playing a key role in facilitating the international drug smuggling trade.

 

 

 

A separate side viewing the war on drugs, bringing up some interesting points. If there were no drugs there would be no need for a drug task force and yes they would be out of a job. Considering all the violence running unchecked in Mexico i would like to hope this is a bit far fetched. Innocent lives lost for money, not the most unbelievable trade off.

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Colombia is no Lesson For Mexico (Part I)

Colombia is no Lesson For Mexico (Part I) | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Since Mexico's crackdown on organized crime was launched in December 2006, it's become popular to compare the fight with Colombia's own drug war between the 1980s and early 2000s. But the comparisons are both risky and wrong.
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Did a Mexican political party have agreements with organized crime? - CNN.com

Did a Mexican political party have agreements with organized crime? - CNN.com | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Mexican President Calderon's comment hinting a link between an opposition political party and organized crime is creating a stir.
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The Geography of Drug Trafficking

The Geography of Drug Trafficking | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Web Site... 

 

Afghanistan and Burma (a.k.a.-Myanmar) are the world's leading producers of the illicit narcotic of heroin.  What environmental, political, developmental and cultural factors play a role in these distribution networks?  What geographic factors contribution to the production of these drugs to be located in these particular places?  Follow the link for a map of global cocaine distribution patterns.   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 5, 2012 7:44 PM
Favorable environmental factors such as mountainous terrain, helps isolate and conceal these regions which creates conditions that makes the production of heroin and cocaine easier. Since you can’t conquer the environment, the best alternative may be further international cooperation to hinder drug trafficking and production.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 7:54 AM
The second half of this article shows just how crucial of a part Mexico plays in the drug trade. Most of the cocaine that comes from the Andean region is pushed up through Mexico and the Carribean only 17 tons are sold in Mexico while 165 tons are distributed into the United States. The US makes up 40% of global cocaine consumption, leaving a huge opportunity open to Mexico.
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The Mexico drug war: Bodies for billions - CNN.com

The Mexico drug war: Bodies for billions - CNN.com | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
There are kingpins with names like the Engineer, head-chopping hit men, dirty cops and double-dealing politicians. And, of course, there are users -- millions of them.
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 5, 2012 7:18 AM
This article carries a great deal of information and the links within it also lend much to the subject. I have scooped those as well due to the important infomation.

There are a few graphic pictures of the brutal nature of the cartels, and one of a graph showing the amount of deaths comparing all total and that just of the Ciudad Juarez cartel.

The wide range of this article speaks to the origin of the drug problem, the present and the future possibilities. It would seem that the change of political hands in 2000, the cartels went into chaos, and since then any resistance has been met with increasingly brutal violence. As it was said in the article "they seemingly kill just because they can." A grim outlook on the everyday life of Mexico's citizens.
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Mexico's Drug War Version 2.0 [FEATURE] | StoptheDrugWar.org

Mexico's Drug War Version 2.0 [FEATURE] | StoptheDrugWar.org | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, August 6, 2012 6:10 PM
If the new president is able to reform the police force as he has said, there may be hope for their fight in the drug war. Corruption running rampant among the previous force exacerbated the issue more then it already was. Becoming united in the cause and with the US backing them, cracking down should slow the trade. The other possibility is escalation, when they start pushing, the cartels may push back causing even more problems. The violence may end up being even worse then before, as hard as that is to believe.
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Cartels use legitimate trade to launder money, U.S., Mexico say

It's fast becoming the money-laundering method of choice for Mexican drug traffickers, U.S. and Mexican officials say, and it involves truckloads not of cash, but of fruit and fabric. Faced with new...
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Arrest of alleged kingpin seen as blow to Sinaloa cartel

Arrest of alleged kingpin seen as blow to Sinaloa cartel | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
SAN DIEGO — Alleged drug kingpin Victor Emilio Cazares, among the most wanted trafficking suspects in the United States, has been arrested in Mexico , U.S. and Mexican officials say, despite having changed his appearance through plastic surgery.
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Google Enters The Drug War

Google Enters The Drug War | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
WESTLAKE VILLAGE, Calif. -- Google, so far, has won the search engine wars. Now it wants to target international crime, including Mexico's powerful drug cartels.
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Would Legalizing Marijuana Stop the Drug Violence in Mexico? - Forbes

Would Legalizing Marijuana Stop the Drug Violence in Mexico? - Forbes | Mexican drug trade | Scoop.it
Sylvia Longmire argues that legalizing marijuana would not really decrease drug violence from the cartels in Mexico: For a growing number of American policy makers, politicians and activists, the best answer to the spiraling violence in Mexico is ...
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Nichole's comment, July 22, 2012 11:15 AM
This is an interesting theory, though I'm not sure legalizing marijuana would actually help. In some ways, it may even make matters worse. The cartels may begin to focus their violence toward those who attempt the legal sale of marijuana, causing them to once again be the only supplier. And since marijuana would be legal at that point, their business would most likely increase, making them financially stronger rather than weakening them. It could play out a lot of different ways, depending on the reaction from the cartels.
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 5:44 AM
I disagree in one sense Nichole, I believe that the legalization would indeed cause the cartels to refocus their violence, however it will not just be a slow process. Marijuana sales are a huge part of their income as you eluded to, and that would be the same for any local convenience store or retailer in Mexico. I think it would create an influx of drugs to most business owners, making it widely available to anyone. i don't believe the cartels could enforce a stoppage that wide, however there is no way of knowing what they are fully capable of. As you said their business would certainly increase, though I believe it would be in the form of exporting drugs and through the sales of other more dangerous drugs within Mexico.