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Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

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Rachel Vartanian's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:40 PM

EdTech is about education: student learning and outcomes. 

Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, August 18, 2014 8:33 PM

Primero la pedagogía, después la tecnología.

Stéphane Bataillard's curator insight, August 24, 2014 1:26 PM

A méditer...

Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
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Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character 

Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character  | Metawriting | Scoop.it
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 6, 11:19 AM
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 7, 2:31 PM
Feedback is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about feedback can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Establishing a Writing Community in the College Classroom

Establishing a Writing Community in the College Classroom | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Fast forward a decade or so… many of these same students now view writing as a chore rather than something to celebrate. As the years progressed, writing became harder, and they started viewing it with dread as they struggled with increasingly difficult tasks. As freshmen in college, they are required to take my developmental writing class; they have not elected to take it. When the course begins, many of my students view themselves as bad writers, and most admit that they don’t like writing.


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10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies

10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Over the last few months I have been working hard to develop a set of commercially available lesson materials. These lesson plans aren't specifically designed for English language learners, though they will be useful for students at higher levels who want stimulating skills based practice or for any teacher interested in developing a CLIL or content based approach to language learning. They were designed to enable any teacher to develop students in a way that is more closely aligned to the kinds of skills they will need to function effectively and critically in the digital world.


Via Nik Peachey
Deanna Mascle's insight:

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

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Giselle Pempedjian's curator insight, March 13, 1:38 AM

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

Jennifer Furr's curator insight, March 13, 10:42 PM

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 8:09 AM

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

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4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise

4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise | Metawriting | Scoop.it
During revision, students should work closely together, share often, discuss models, add details, delete the unnecessary, and rearrange for clarity and effect.

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Web 2.0 for ELT's curator insight, February 25, 2:14 AM

Very good ideas.

rajamedinah's curator insight, March 5, 5:37 AM

These are actually quite good steps for developing a process approach to writing.

Daniel Jäggli's curator insight, March 8, 5:54 AM

These are actually quite good steps for developing a process approach to writing.

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Notable Notes: Writing as Thinking - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Writing as Thinking - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
two interesting strategies to promote thinking through writing
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Teacher’s Guide: Five ways Minecraft (and other video games) can boost student writing skills by Liam O'Donnell

Teacher’s Guide: Five ways Minecraft (and other video games) can boost student writing skills by  Liam O'Donnell | Metawriting | Scoop.it

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Breaking the Ice with an Argument - Metawriting

Breaking the Ice with an Argument - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
TweetSumoMe TweetThis week my first-year college students got to know each other better through argumentation thanks to my adaptation of Dave Stuart’s idea for an icebreaker that also introduces argumentation. In previous classes, we spent time getting to know each other through six-word stories and sharing our superpowers and kryptonite. Then students created Digital Untros...
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Notable Notes: Starting The Year Off Write (Reprise) - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Starting The Year Off Write (Reprise) - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
TweetSumoMe TweetIn my last blog post, Starting The Year Off Write, I noted some of my favorite ways to kick off the school year or semester using writing to break the ice and set the stage for the work we will do together. This post will share some great tips from my professional learning network...
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10 Must Have Tools for BYOD Classroom

10 Must Have Tools for BYOD Classroom | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Sergei Polovin's curator insight, November 14, 2015 9:54 AM

Interesting sites.

RESENTICE's curator insight, November 14, 2015 4:44 PM

GOOGLE classroom, Nearpod, SOCRATIVE teacher and student, Classdojo, TODAYSMEET and POLLeverywhere : applications utiles dans le cas de l'utilisation des équipements personnels des élèves en classe

Tony Guzman's curator insight, November 18, 2015 11:49 AM

This article shares a list of 10 tools/apps to consider for use in the BYOD classroom.

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CristinaSkyBox: Writing - The Space Between

CristinaSkyBox: Writing - The Space Between | Metawriting | Scoop.it

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Students can write: Making writing tasks relevant and personal can bring out hidden skills.

Students can write: Making writing tasks relevant and personal can bring out hidden skills. | Metawriting | Scoop.it

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A Guide to Producing Student Digital Storytellers

A Guide to Producing Student Digital Storytellers | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Everyone tells stories: journalists, politicians, scientists and entrepreneurs. Conveying information in a coherent and compelling way is vital to success in the real world, and it’s our job as educators to prepare our students to share their ideas in effective ways.The emphasis is on empowering st

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Five Resources To Charge Up Your Writing Conferences

Five Resources To Charge Up Your Writing Conferences | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Knowing what to teach is just as important as knowing how to teach. Here are five resources that will help with the what. Bonus: some are free!
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5 Resources That Help You Answer “What’s That Word?”

5 Resources That Help You Answer “What’s That Word?” | Metawriting | Scoop.it
You’re trying to think of a word, but it stubbornly refuses to materialize. Oh, well. You’ll think of it—when it’s too late. What do you do in the meantime?
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Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music

Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Download royalty free music for use in films, YouTube, and other projects, with no copyright restrictions.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, March 9, 3:07 AM

Royalty free music for Youtube and other projects with no copyright restrictions

wu wei's curator insight, March 13, 3:32 PM
Just share great music for everybody:)
Emily Lee's curator insight, March 31, 8:15 PM
This is very interesting to know that the royalty music does not have copyright restrictions. 
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Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful

Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful | Metawriting | Scoop.it
"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!

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"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Kristin Elliott's curator insight, March 8, 8:45 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 13, 9:47 AM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 14, 4:13 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration?

Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration? | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Perhaps instead of focusing our concerns on technology as a wonderful aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, and then ask ourselves (we are the clever adults here) how we can incorporate those elements into our formalized assessments.


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Charli Wiggill's curator insight, February 4, 12:48 PM

Thought-provoking and offering each of us a challenge...

#MIEExpert #MIEExperts

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 10, 1:54 AM
Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration?
Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, February 21, 8:05 PM

There is a very thin line between plagiarism and collaboration where group assessments are concerned. I also feel that in this digital age, the type of assessments, activities and questions should be re-defined and reworked. I also try to provide "wrappers" in the class especially on ethics. 

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#WhyIWrite - I Write Because I Must - Metawriting

#WhyIWrite - I Write Because I Must - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
TweetSumoMe TweetI write because I must. I must write assignments and lessons, comments to my students, models for them too, emails to my colleagues, and reports too many to name. I must blog, because I have so much to say about writing, teaching, and especially teaching writing. I must create poems, essays, and more, because »more
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Notable Notes: Considering the Literacy Narrative - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Considering the Literacy Narrative - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Notable Notes: Considering the Literacy Narrative
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The Digital Writing Process

The Digital Writing Process | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Now, with nearly 20 years of middle and high school teaching behind me, I still respect the writing process approach and its benefits. I also recognize that the nature of writing has changed tremendously over those two decades due to the significant influence of digital tools and sources. Of course, today’s composers still must meet the commonly accepted conventions of the genre in which they are engaged, but our visual digital culture creates different demands than did the primarily print text-based world.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 4, 2015 4:52 AM

Interesting approach to digital writing.

Digital Communication Students's curator insight, December 4, 2015 7:00 AM

"The nature of writing has changed tremendously over those two decades due to the significant influence of digital tools and sources". We completely agree with this phrase. Our way of writing is changing more than we notice. I figure that adults notice this more than young people, because this last group were born with the Internet. Nevertheless, its very important to learn how to write properly, this article provides the tools and the practice we need.

Annenkov's curator insight, December 5, 2015 9:14 AM

Algorythm SOARS:
    Survey
Organize
    Address:
Revise:
    Survey Again:

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Starting The Year Off Write - Metawriting

Starting The Year Off Write - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
TweetSumoMe TweetHow do you start things off with your students? I used to dive into the horribly, tedious syllabus review session on the first day. Big mistake! Not only is it boring for everyone, but it also makes a terrible first impression. I don’t want my students to think my class is all about rules...
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I Am A Writing Evangelist - Metawriting

I Am A Writing Evangelist - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
There has been intense discussion in my circles, both on- and off-line, of late about whether or not everyone is a writer (inspired by Rachel Toor’s “Scholars Talk Writing”). For the record, I believe everyone is a writer and everyone should write, and that may be why I was struck by a term I heard recently – Technology Evangelist – used to describe a person who promotes a particular product or technology with the zeal commonly associated with religious evangelism which describes the promotion of a particular set of beliefs (see Wikipedia). That is when I had the epiphany that I am a writing evangelist.

The act of writing itself is a technology and it uses a variety of technologies ranging from the low technology of using a stick to etch into mud or to the high tech of typing words on a computer screen. Writing can be a simple tool we use to note appointments or remind us to buy milk. Writing can be a private tool we help to remember the details of important milestones and think through important ideas. Writing can be a public tool to connect and communicate. Writing can be a weapon wielded to change the world or a spotlight to shine in dark corners. Writing can be majestic and magical or mundane and minute or every point in between. We all have the power to use writing for these purposes and this makes us all writers.

Sadly, too many voices have been silenced by red-inked swords and the scar tissue left in their wake. These writers forget that the only opinion that matters is their own. Unfortunately, too many writers have crumpled their words and tossed them away because they cannot compare to Hemingway or Angelou or Gonzales. These writers forget Hemingway was not always Hemingway and Angelou discarded more words than she shared. Even famous, published Writers (with a capital “W”) do not perform every writing task with equal panache. Even struggling novice writers can make angels weep. We are all writers even though at any given moment, and on any given task, we perform on a broad spectrum.

I pity those whose own self-belief must be built on the bones of others’ despair. There is not a limited pool of writing talent. Conceding that others might possess ability does not diminish yours. Helping other writers does not threaten you. I despise those who want to guard the gates to the ivory tower home to all Canonical Writers with ridiculous rules and an insurmountable moat. The truth is that any writer at any time has the power to inspire and to move any audience. We are all uplifted when writers are given free rein to write.

That is why I am a writing evangelist. I soothe balm on scarred and damaged voices. I celebrate the magic these voices bring to my life. I stand between these voices and the naysayers and doubters. I believe that nurturing voices is my gift to the world and by doing so I have made the world a better place for all of us. Are you a writing evangelist? Do you believe everyone can be a writer?
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Notable Notes: What does it mean to be a writer? - Metawriting

Notable Notes: What does it mean to be a writer? - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
TweetSumoMe TweetOne of the most popular links on my Twitter feed lately has been a post by Melissa Donovan of Writing Forward. Her post, “Thoughts on Becoming a Writer,” explores the journey of becoming a writer and what it means to be a writer, but what really resonated with me was the simple statement: “stop...
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Encouraging Nonfiction Reading and Writing - edu Pulse

Encouraging Nonfiction Reading and Writing - edu Pulse | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Students’ self-published books teach Common Core State Standards. I @scholasticadms
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