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5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students

5 Powerful Questions Teachers Can Ask Students | Metawriting | Scoop.it
My first year teaching a literacy coach came to observe my classroom. After the students left, she commented on how I asked the whole class a question, would wait just a few seconds, and then answer i
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Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
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15 Digital Storytelling Tools for Educators | D...

15 Digital Storytelling Tools for Educators | D... | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Engaging, multimedia-rich digital stories can capture the attention of students and increase their interest in exploring new ideas.

Via Matt Smeller
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44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work | Metawriting | Scoop.it
44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Grisell Rodriguez's curator insight, April 30, 1:34 PM

Nice infographic

Grisell Rodriguez's curator insight, April 30, 1:39 PM

Nice infographic

AlisonMcNab's curator insight, May 1, 11:43 AM

44 Diverse Tools To Publish Student Work

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Student shaming is bad for YOU

Student shaming is bad for YOU | Metawriting | Scoop.it
I’ve been thinking a lot about the issue of student shaming and why we shouldn’t do it. I agree with others who have argued that it is bad for our students  and it is bad for education, but perhaps...
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29 Unique Ideas for Publishing Student Work

29 Unique Ideas for Publishing Student Work | Metawriting | Scoop.it
After you've looked at these 29 sites, there's no reason to print student work and stick it on a wall. You have too many options: Book Cover creator Create a magazine cover Flipboard—organize ideas...
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Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane

Ten Reflective Questions to Ask at the End of Class - Brilliant or Insane | Metawriting | Scoop.it
How deep is your commitment to reflective practice?

Do you maintain a reflective journal? Do you blog? Do you capture and archive your reflections in a different space?

Do you consistently reserve a bit of time for your own reflective work? Do you help the learners you serve do the same?

I began creating dedicated time and space for reflection toward the end of my classroom teaching career, and the practice has followed me through my work at the WNY Young Writer’s Studio. I’ve found that it can take very little time and yet, the return on our investment has always been significant.

Via John Evans
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Darrington Lee's curator insight, March 7, 9:36 PM

I feel that it is generally important to reflect on one self after taking a lesson, this ensures we are learning on the right track and doesn't "fall off" the topic. Reflection keep us calm and collected, so we can stand back straight up even after a failure to accomplish something. This gives us a never ending space to improve and beyond than just learning, but also to persevere, take responsibility in one's learning and also to excel in things we do.

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 9, 1:54 PM

Reflection...don't leave class without it!

Ann-Lois Edström's curator insight, March 10, 12:52 PM

Att reflektera över sin undervisning och hjälpa eleverna att också göra det. Jättebra frågor!

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How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic]

How To Find Openly Licensed Educational Resources You Can Use [Infographic] | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Most of us turn to the internet when we are looking for resources to use for a presentation, report or article. The internet holds the key to so many robust resources.

Yet how many of these resources can you legally use for free? How many of them can you adapt?

That’s where Open Educational Resources (OER) can help. Here’s an infographic from the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (at the University of Texas at Austin) that can help.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Suzanne's curator insight, February 17, 5:02 AM

Every language teacher and student should contribute to make this a powerful resource concept. Language is an instrument; use it, take care of it, share it.

Dean Mantz's curator insight, February 18, 11:15 AM

Thanks to @Dennis T OConnor for sharing this infographic on finding and identifying open source education resources.  

Iolanda Bueno de Camargo Cortelazzo's curator insight, February 19, 12:00 PM

Bastante úteis estas informações para professores e gestores educacionais.

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5 Free Tools For Making Digital Portfolios | Edudemic

5 Free Tools For Making Digital Portfolios | Edudemic | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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CTD Institute's curator insight, February 10, 10:22 AM

At the top of the list is Google. With its portability, synch capability and extensive apps, Google is THE tool for making ePortfolios.

Calliope Global Fran's curator insight, February 10, 8:09 PM
I used to ask my students to keep a digital portfolio on Blogger, and we also had a shared Blogger site to which they all published.
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What Can You Learn From And About Your Students?

What Can You Learn From And About Your Students? | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Good teachers already know that we learn from our students every day. They teach us things about our world, technology, and sometimes even our own area of expertise, but perhaps the most important ...
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Story Starters

Story Starters | Metawriting | Scoop.it
I have been collecting story starters, you can use them with your class and add some of your own in the comments. Cheers  Rob

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Judith Morais's curator insight, February 4, 5:31 AM

Sentences starters. Images. There's a good range of writing prompts here. 

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, February 4, 4:10 PM

LOL!  My favourite one is "I didn’t mean to kill her."


Needing a little inspiration?  This is a fun exercise to try out.  Who knows, the exercise may end up becoming a best seller?!?

Marc Quentel's curator insight, February 5, 12:31 PM

Des idées de départ en expression écrite et littérature : images ou phrases, de quoi stimuler la créativité.

En anglais, mais il ne s'agit que d'une phrase simple généralement, donc pourquoi pas un peu de LVE en plus ?

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Digital Writing with Google Apps - Diana Benner

Digital Writing with Google Apps - Diana Benner | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Diana Benner's Website

Via Kirsten Wilson
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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, February 2, 11:32 AM

Digital writing with Google resource. Pulled from Tweets @TCEA15. Will be digging into this treasure and sharing/collaborating with teachers and students.

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Public Domain - Free Historic Media Files for Projects

Public Domain - Free Historic Media Files for Projects | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Download thousands of historic media files for your creative projects.Completely free & made available by Pond5.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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The Group Learning Document

The Group Learning Document | Metawriting | Scoop.it
As I’ve blogged before, I am very interested in collaborative learning projects and not so much in the static, academic paper that exists nowhere in the real world. I am interested in creating writ...
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Content Curation Takes Time

Content Curation Takes Time | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Filomena Gomes's curator insight, April 18, 9:52 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Notwithstanding the viral content-marketing tam-tam keeps selling the idea of content curation as a miracle-shortcut to work less, produce more content and get all of the benefits that an online publisher would want to have, reality has quite a different shade.

To gain reader's attention trust and interest, it is evidently not enough to pull together a few interesting titles while adding a few lines of introductory text.

 

Unless your readers are not very interested themselves into the topic you cover, why would they take recomendations from someone who has not even had the time to fully go through his suggested resources?

Superficially picking apparently interesting content from titles or even automatically selecting content for others to read is like recommending movies or music records based on how much you like their trailers or their cover layouts.

 

Can that be useful beyond attracting some initial extra visibility?

 

How can one become a trusted information source if one does not thoroughly look and understand at what he is about to recommend?

This is why selling or even thinking the idea of using content curation as a time and money-saver is really non-sense.

Again, for some, this type of light content curation may work in attracting some extra visibility in the short-term, but it will be deleterious in the long one, as serious readers discover gradually that content being suggested has not even been read, let alone being summarized, highlighted or contextualized.

Content curation takes serious time.

 

A lot more than the one needed to create normal original content.

To curate content you need to:

Find good content, resources and references. Even if you have good tools, the value is in searching where everyone else is not looking. That takes time.

Read, verify and vet each potential resource, by taking the time needed to do this thoroughly.

Make sense of what that resource communicates or represents / offers and be able to synthesize it for non-experts who will read about it.

Synthesize and highlight the value of the chosen resource within the context of your interest area.

Enrich the resource with relevant references, and related links for those that will want to find out more about it.

Credit and attribute sources and contributors.

 Preserve, classify and archive what you want to curate.

Share, distribute, promote the curated work you have produced. Creating it is not enough.


(While it is certainly possible to do a good curation job without doing exactly all of the tasks I have outlined above, I believe that it is ideal to try to do as many as these as possible, as each adds more value to the end result you will create.)

 

These are many more steps and activities than the ones required to create an original piece of content.

Curation is all about quality, insight and attention to details.

It is not about quantity, speed, saving time, producing more with less.

 
Robert Kisalama's curator insight, April 18, 11:37 AM

truly Curation should not be  merely aggregating different links without  taking off time to reflect indeed it is very to end up like some one buying clothes impulsively only to realise you could have done without some of them.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2:24 PM

 

326
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3 reasons why you should practice metateaching

3 reasons why you should practice metateaching | Metawriting | Scoop.it
I named my blog Metawriting for a reason. One of the foundational principles of my theory of teaching writing (or fostering writers as I prefer to think of it) is that in order to improve writing w...
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Rescooped by Deanna Mascle from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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How do You Choose Good Online Sources? (Infographic)

How do You Choose Good Online Sources? (Infographic) | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Students often ask how to determine which websites and articles are good sources to cite. My answer is always, "Well, what do you think?" Students need to be able to think on their own. So, if your...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 25, 10:21 PM

There are good ideas. What I find interesting, is I know some Internet sources i.e. blogs that are followed extensively and are written by people who spent little time in the classroom and no nothing about teaching.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, March 26, 12:05 PM

Mia MacMeekin's useful poster for student assessment of credibility

Sally Tilley's curator insight, March 26, 6:13 PM

We need to continually reinforce these skills for our students to master this, thanks for sharing

 

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Stop teaching on-demand writing, make writers instead

Stop teaching on-demand writing, make writers instead | Metawriting | Scoop.it
As the director of a National Writing Project site I am frequently asked by administrators and teachers for a quick fix for the on-demand writing scores of their school or district. Let me be clear...
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Easing The Pain Of Grading

Easing The Pain Of Grading | Metawriting | Scoop.it
While everyone else is enjoying a snow day, I am in the midst of midterm grading. Why does it always seem like a good idea to place assignment due dates so close to the grading window when I am bui...
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Content Curation Takes Time

Content Curation Takes Time | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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Filomena Gomes's curator insight, April 18, 9:52 AM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Notwithstanding the viral content-marketing tam-tam keeps selling the idea of content curation as a miracle-shortcut to work less, produce more content and get all of the benefits that an online publisher would want to have, reality has quite a different shade.

To gain reader's attention trust and interest, it is evidently not enough to pull together a few interesting titles while adding a few lines of introductory text.

 

Unless your readers are not very interested themselves into the topic you cover, why would they take recomendations from someone who has not even had the time to fully go through his suggested resources?

Superficially picking apparently interesting content from titles or even automatically selecting content for others to read is like recommending movies or music records based on how much you like their trailers or their cover layouts.

 

Can that be useful beyond attracting some initial extra visibility?

 

How can one become a trusted information source if one does not thoroughly look and understand at what he is about to recommend?

This is why selling or even thinking the idea of using content curation as a time and money-saver is really non-sense.

Again, for some, this type of light content curation may work in attracting some extra visibility in the short-term, but it will be deleterious in the long one, as serious readers discover gradually that content being suggested has not even been read, let alone being summarized, highlighted or contextualized.

Content curation takes serious time.

 

A lot more than the one needed to create normal original content.

To curate content you need to:

Find good content, resources and references. Even if you have good tools, the value is in searching where everyone else is not looking. That takes time.

Read, verify and vet each potential resource, by taking the time needed to do this thoroughly.

Make sense of what that resource communicates or represents / offers and be able to synthesize it for non-experts who will read about it.

Synthesize and highlight the value of the chosen resource within the context of your interest area.

Enrich the resource with relevant references, and related links for those that will want to find out more about it.

Credit and attribute sources and contributors.

 Preserve, classify and archive what you want to curate.

Share, distribute, promote the curated work you have produced. Creating it is not enough.


(While it is certainly possible to do a good curation job without doing exactly all of the tasks I have outlined above, I believe that it is ideal to try to do as many as these as possible, as each adds more value to the end result you will create.)

 

These are many more steps and activities than the ones required to create an original piece of content.

Curation is all about quality, insight and attention to details.

It is not about quantity, speed, saving time, producing more with less.

 
Robert Kisalama's curator insight, April 18, 11:37 AM

truly Curation should not be  merely aggregating different links without  taking off time to reflect indeed it is very to end up like some one buying clothes impulsively only to realise you could have done without some of them.

Nedko Aldev's curator insight, April 19, 2:24 PM

 

326
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Teaching with Content Curation

Teaching with Content Curation | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Content curation is the process of collecting, organizing and displaying information relevant to a particular topic. Teacher content curation can be used by students and students can be asked to sh...

Via ICTPHMS
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Zhang Meilan's curator insight, March 9, 7:14 PM

通过内容策展教学。

Iolanda Bueno de Camargo Cortelazzo's curator insight, March 14, 10:41 AM

Again, some instructions very useful for those who are beginning in Curation  for Education.

Thanks.

Jocelyn Bassett's curator insight, April 2, 10:50 PM

Digital curation includes the up-keeping, safeguarding and enhancing of digital data throughout its duration.

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Why Blog?

Why Blog? | Metawriting | Scoop.it
My blog is now two years old and I have 104 posts which means I have been able to maintain my goal of blogging on a weekly basis (on average). This simple fact gives me tremendous satisfaction, pro...
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Why Writing Studio?

Why Writing Studio? | Metawriting | Scoop.it
The Writing Workshop is a time-honored tradition among writing teachers trained in National Writing Project methods as well as followers of Peter Elbow, Lucy Calkins, and Nancy Atwell. In a writing...
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Rescooped by Deanna Mascle from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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The Best Website Builders to Create a Clean Online Portfolio

The Best Website Builders to Create a Clean Online Portfolio | Metawriting | Scoop.it
If you don't already have an online portfolio, you should seriously – and I mean very seriously – consider building one. It doesn't have to be difficult and it doesn't have to be complicated. In fact, the 10 sites listed below make creating an online portfolio quite easy. Whether you're 18 or 88, having an…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Let's Make Some Brain Movies Together

Let's Make Some Brain Movies Together | Metawriting | Scoop.it

I am fascinated my the idea of feedforward or what some call visualization or others refer to as 'brain movies'. I will be experimenting with this technique in my own learning and helping my university students' learnings as well.  Join me.

 


Via Terry Elliott
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Feedback Loops & Writing Workshop

Feedback Loops & Writing Workshop | Metawriting | Scoop.it
As I noted last week (Why Writing Studio?), I am devotee of writing workshop and a tremendous fan of Peter Elbow, but then as a National Writing Project teacher this is programmed into my pedagogy....
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