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Utilizing Twitter chats for professional development

Utilizing Twitter chats for professional development | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Each week, educators from around the world take part in various conversations on Twitter known as "chats." These conversations have become an excellent way
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Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
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15 (More) Reasons Writing Is Important-in Your Own Words - Helping Writers Become Authors

15 (More) Reasons Writing Is Important-in Your Own Words - Helping Writers Become Authors | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Turns out I'm not the only one who believes writing is important. You do too! Here are the top 15 things you have taught me about the importance of writing.
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4 Useful Chromebooks Apps for Digital Storytelling via @medkh9

4 Useful Chromebooks Apps for Digital Storytelling via @medkh9 | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Notable Notes: Teachers Should Write (reprise) - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Teachers Should Write (reprise) - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Share the entire process with your students and you will all learn and grow.
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Notable Notes: Every Teacher Should Write - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Every Teacher Should Write - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
All too often writing in school is not meaningful
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Potential Power of Blogging for Pedagogy

Potential Power of Blogging for Pedagogy | Metawriting | Scoop.it
I believe in the potential power of blogging. I believe it can be harnessed to be a powerful pedagogical tool in the 21st Century.

 

4 Benefits of Integrating Blogging into Pedagogy

1. Blogs promote participation and collaboration of knowledge and skills. There are a myriad of resources available on the internet that can help students become creators, and not merely consumers of different texts and bodies of knowledge.

 

2. Blogs promote global communication and collaboration. Teachers can facilitate interactions with diverse cultures, ethnicities, and religions, and social contexts. Students can be helped to challenging their thinking by considering other viewpoints.

 

3. Blogs promote the critical analysis of pedagogy and literacies.

 

4. Blogs create the potential for interactive spaces for authentic exchanges. Strategies including reading logs, book reviews, parental communication, encouraging reading and writing and responding around a particular theme or focus.

If we can harness this power, we have a strong pedagogical tool on our hands. As with other areas in education, we can begin to harness this power by asking ourselves the right kinds of questions that can bring about the results we want to see.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/06/06/blogging-is-it-difficult-i-guess-not-a-all-follow-my-advice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/practice/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/practice-using-blogs-for-home-work-to-get-ict-skills-and-creativity/

 


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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, June 15, 3:55 AM
useful ideas and facts why blogging is useful in education
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, June 15, 8:58 AM
I encourage my teachers to blog for the same reasons listed here. Powerful learning tool for the 21st Century.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, June 15, 4:24 PM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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How Remix Culture Informs Student Writing & Creativity

How Remix Culture Informs Student Writing & Creativity | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Artistic remix influences kids’ creativity on almost every level. Here's how, and why you need to understand it.
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My #OneLittleWord for 2016 is Cool - Metawriting

My #OneLittleWord for 2016 is Cool - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
my progression from Serenity Prayer to Seinfeld to Happy Days to Pulp Fiction?
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Content Curation: The Art of a Curated Post [Infographic]

Content Curation: The Art of a Curated Post [Infographic] | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Content curation is an economical way to increase content production - & it's easy when you have an informative infographic to guide you.

Via Vladimir Kukharenko
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Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character 

Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character  | Metawriting | Scoop.it
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 6, 11:19 AM
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 7, 2:31 PM
Feedback is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about feedback can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Establishing a Writing Community in the College Classroom

Establishing a Writing Community in the College Classroom | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Fast forward a decade or so… many of these same students now view writing as a chore rather than something to celebrate. As the years progressed, writing became harder, and they started viewing it with dread as they struggled with increasingly difficult tasks. As freshmen in college, they are required to take my developmental writing class; they have not elected to take it. When the course begins, many of my students view themselves as bad writers, and most admit that they don’t like writing.


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10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies

10 Lesson Plans to Develop Digital Literacies | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Over the last few months I have been working hard to develop a set of commercially available lesson materials. These lesson plans aren't specifically designed for English language learners, though they will be useful for students at higher levels who want stimulating skills based practice or for any teacher interested in developing a CLIL or content based approach to language learning. They were designed to enable any teacher to develop students in a way that is more closely aligned to the kinds of skills they will need to function effectively and critically in the digital world.


Via Nik Peachey
Deanna Mascle's insight:

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

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Jennifer Furr's curator insight, March 13, 10:42 PM

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 14, 8:09 AM

A collection of 10 of my lesson plans designed to develop critical thinking and digital literacy.

Dave Sharp's curator insight, May 10, 6:21 PM
Lesson plans and activities to help with literacy for all ages. This program is  designed to focus on giving specific skills to a student studying literacy at all levels. The 10 lessons also give the teacher access to relevant information required when catering for a students needs.
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4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise

4 Strategies for Teaching Students How to Revise | Metawriting | Scoop.it
During revision, students should work closely together, share often, discuss models, add details, delete the unnecessary, and rearrange for clarity and effect.

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Web 2.0 for ELT's curator insight, February 25, 2:14 AM

Very good ideas.

rajamedinah's curator insight, March 5, 5:37 AM

These are actually quite good steps for developing a process approach to writing.

Daniel Jäggli's curator insight, March 8, 5:54 AM

These are actually quite good steps for developing a process approach to writing.

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Notable Notes: Writing as Thinking - Metawriting

Notable Notes: Writing as Thinking - Metawriting | Metawriting | Scoop.it
two interesting strategies to promote thinking through writing
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The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix

The British Library Puts 1,000,000 Images into the Public Domain, Making Them Free to Reuse & Remix | Metawriting | Scoop.it


Earlier this week, Oxford's Bodleian Library announced that it had digitized a 550 year old copy of the Gutenberg Bible along with a number of other ancient bibles, some of them quite beautiful. Not to be outdone, the British Library came out with its own announcement on Thursday:

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Free HTML5 Online Animation Maker, Banner Maker and Video Maker | Animatron

Free HTML5 Online Animation Maker, Banner Maker and Video Maker | Animatron | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Make engaging and compelling animations online for your business or school. Create explainer videos, animated marketing videos, training videos and presentations. Make HTML5 banners and interactive video content.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 15, 12:48 AM

This looks good. You can make up to 5 public projects on the free account.

António Leça Domingues's curator insight, July 16, 4:12 AM
Aplicação de animação gráfica web gratuita.
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5 Opportunities to Amplify Your Writing

5 Opportunities to Amplify Your Writing | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Langwitches, The Magic of Learning.
Modern learning that transforms education in the 21st century. Finding new forms and redefining learning for the challenges of the future .

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Therese Torris's curator insight, July 18, 7:21 AM
Quite well put
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Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice | #Blogs #Communication #ICT #eSkills 

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice | #Blogs #Communication #ICT #eSkills  | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice I hear nearly each day: Blogging, WHY and How and THEN I don't have THAT time to do it and WHY SHOULD I do it!? Well, a GOOD question anyway! I will try to explain... Anybody has a story to tell,…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 6, 12:04 PM

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice I hear nearly each day: Blogging, WHY and How and THEN I don't have THAT time to do it and WHY SHOULD I do it!? Well, a GOOD question anyway! I will try to explain... Anybody has a story to tell,…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging

 

 

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Praise Poetry

Praise Poetry | Metawriting | Scoop.it
A praise poem is a tribute. Praise poetry holds a special place in southern African literature. In Zulu, praise poetry is called izibongo. It refers to
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Five Minute Film School: Movie Making For the Rest of Us!

Everyone is a filmmaker. Learn how to be one here!

Via John Evans
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David Baker's curator insight, May 24, 6:15 PM
What a great tool for explaining the process. Fun way to introduce project to students or teachers. I'm wondering how this might be part of new teacher induction, PIE or student teacher seminars. This might be a fun option for PIE infographic night. 
David Baker's curator insight, May 24, 6:16 PM
What a great tool for explaining the process. Fun way to introduce project to students or teachers. I'm wondering how this might be part of new teacher induction, PIE or student teacher seminars.
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5 Resources That Help You Answer “What’s That Word?”

5 Resources That Help You Answer “What’s That Word?” | Metawriting | Scoop.it
You’re trying to think of a word, but it stubbornly refuses to materialize. Oh, well. You’ll think of it—when it’s too late. What do you do in the meantime?
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Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music

Royalty free music. Public domain and copyright free classical music | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Download royalty free music for use in films, YouTube, and other projects, with no copyright restrictions.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, March 9, 3:07 AM

Royalty free music for Youtube and other projects with no copyright restrictions

wu wei's curator insight, March 13, 3:32 PM
Just share great music for everybody:)
Emily Lee's curator insight, March 31, 8:15 PM
This is very interesting to know that the royalty music does not have copyright restrictions. 
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Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful

Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful | Metawriting | Scoop.it
"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!

Via Gust MEES
Deanna Mascle's insight:

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Kristin Elliott's curator insight, March 8, 8:45 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 13, 9:47 AM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 14, 4:13 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration?

Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration? | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Perhaps instead of focusing our concerns on technology as a wonderful aid to plagiarizers, we should focus on its ability to foster creativity and collaboration, and then ask ourselves (we are the clever adults here) how we can incorporate those elements into our formalized assessments.


Via Nik Peachey
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Charli Wiggill's curator insight, February 4, 12:48 PM

Thought-provoking and offering each of us a challenge...

#MIEExpert #MIEExperts

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 10, 1:54 AM
Is It Plagiarism or Collaboration?
Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, February 21, 8:05 PM

There is a very thin line between plagiarism and collaboration where group assessments are concerned. I also feel that in this digital age, the type of assessments, activities and questions should be re-defined and reworked. I also try to provide "wrappers" in the class especially on ethics.