Metawriting
17.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Deanna Mascle from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character 

Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character  | Metawriting | Scoop.it
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, April 6, 2016 11:19 AM
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 7, 2016 2:31 PM
Feedback is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about feedback can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Rescooped by Deanna Mascle from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Learning to live with The Art of Criticism, Critics...

Learning to live with The Art of Criticism, Critics... | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Gust MEES
more...
Rescooped by Deanna Mascle from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Find the Coaching in Criticism

Find the Coaching in Criticism | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Your growth depends on your ability to pull value from criticism in spite of your natural responses and on your willingness to seek out even more advice and coaching from bosses, peers, and subordinates.

 

They may be good or bad at providing it, or they may have little time for it—but you are the most important factor in your own development. If you’re determined to learn from whatever feedback you get, no one can stop you.


Via Gust MEES
more...
Shayne Swift's curator insight, December 27, 2013 5:10 PM

good tips for parents, students, administrators and teachers.

John E Smith's curator insight, July 5, 2014 3:32 PM

Note the emphasis on the person being coached having an actual role in finding coaching ... much different from the idea of passively receiving coaching ...

Dmitry Naumov's curator insight, July 18, 2014 11:17 PM

another one