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Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
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Google’s Location History Browser Is A Minute-By-Minute Map Of Your Life

Google’s Location History Browser Is A Minute-By-Minute Map Of Your Life | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Quick! Where were you last Tuesday at 6:35 PM? If you’re anything like me, your answer is probably along the lines of “I… have absolutely no idea.”..

 

But odds are, Google knows. They probably know where you’ve been most other days, too. And they’ll happily show you, letting you relive your life one step at a time.

 

If you carry any Google-filled gear (like, say, an Android phone or tablet), there was a prompt during the initial setup that asked if Google could transmit your location data back to the mothership. This is that data. You know how Google Now can auto-magically figure out where you work and warn you about traffic?

 

This is the data that makes that possible (or at least a good chunk of it.)


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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:11 PM

But odds are, Google knows. They probably know where you’ve been most other days, too. And they’ll happily show you, letting you relive your life one step at a time.

 

If you carry any Google-filled gear (like, say, an Android phone or tablet), there was a prompt during the initial setup that asked if Google could transmit your location data back to the mothership.

 

This is that data.

 

You know how Google Now can auto-magically figure out where you work and warn you about traffic?

 

This is the data that makes that possible (or at least a good chunk of it.)

 

Learn more:

 

 - http://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?tag=Privacy

 

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83% Of Mobile Apps Are Risky

83% Of Mobile Apps Are Risky | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Summer 2013 App Reputation Report to examine the hidden behaviors behind free and paid mobile apps

 

The cloud-based, fully automated Appthority App Risk Management Service performed static, dynamic and behavioral app analysis on the 400 most popular free and paid apps on the iOS and Android platforms.

 

  

Appthority analyzed each app for particular behaviors within a test environment

.

Highlights from the App Reputation Report are:

 

- Overall, 83% of the most popular apps are associated with security risks and privacy issues.

 

- iOS apps exhibited more risky behaviors than Android apps. 91% of iOS apps exhibit at least one risky behavior, as compared to 80% of Android apps.

 

- 95% of the top free apps and 77.5% of the top paid apps exhibited at least one risky behavior.

 

- 78% of the most popular free Android apps identify the user's ID (UDID).

 

- Even though Apple prohibits its developers from accessing the UDID, 5.5% of the tested iOS apps still do.

 

- 72% of the top free apps track for the user's location, compared to 41% of paid apps.

 

- Although paid apps already generate revenue when downloaded, 59% of paid iOS and 24% of paid Android apps still support in-app purchasing.

 

- Furthermore, 39% of paid iOS and 16% of paid Android apps still share data with ad networks.

 


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How Thieves Use Social Media To Rob You

How Thieves Use Social Media To Rob You | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Thinking of tweeting about an upcoming holiday? Don’t. Thinking of sharing a photo of your latest grand purchase? Don’t. Thinking of checking in at the airport before your vacation? Don’t.

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JM - Axioma WebLab's curator insight, August 1, 2013 9:34 PM

Take note of this info !.

MeeMetICT's curator insight, October 15, 2013 2:04 AM

Met de vakantie voor de deur wel even de moeite om te bekijken.

Carmenne K. Thapliyal's curator insight, October 15, 2013 2:36 AM

An infographic with some important information we can share with students

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Smile! Hackers Can Silently Access Your Webcam Right Through The Browser (Again)

Smile! Hackers Can Silently Access Your Webcam Right Through The Browser (Again) | Metawriting | Scoop.it
You know those people who put tape over their laptop's webcam to keep digital peeping toms at bay? They're not crazy.

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Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, June 15, 2013 11:29 AM

Tested it - and it's true - it works on Chrome.  Scary :-(

AnnC's curator insight, June 16, 2013 4:18 PM

FYI - you can be seen - how do you look?

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Teens, Social Media, and Privacy | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project

Teens, Social Media, and Privacy | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Youth are sharing more personal information on their profiles than in the past. They choose private settings for Facebook, but share with large networks of friends.

 

 

 

 

 

Key findings include:

 

Teens are sharing more information about themselves on their social media profiles than they did when we last surveyed in 2006:

 

- 91% post a photo of themselves, up from 79% in 2006.

 

- 71% post their school name, up from 49%.

 

- 71% post the city or town where they live, up from 61%.

 

- 53% post their email address, up from 29%.

 

- 20% post their cell phone number, up from 2%.

 


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Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, May 22, 2013 7:58 AM

The Pew Reports are always fascinating.

Dave Webb's curator insight, May 22, 2013 11:28 AM

Youth are sharing more personal information on their profiles than in the past. They choose private settings for Facebook, but share with large networks of friends.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 22, 2013 6:29 PM

Educators should be aware of this. Will there be issues or concerns down the road?

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PracTICE: Using Blogs For Home Work To Get ICT Skills and Creativity

PracTICE: Using Blogs For Home Work To Get ICT Skills and Creativity | Metawriting | Scoop.it
. . This is the second blog about "Blogging" and in the first one ===> PracTICE: Using Blogs for Critical Thinking and Proactive Thinking <=== WE were talking about WHAT would be the BEST way...

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Online Privacy: How Did We Get Here?

As technology has evolved over the past two centuries, so have our expectations about privacy. This new digital world allows us to connect with each other wi...

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Social Media and SSO – What, Me Worry?

Social Media and SSO – What, Me Worry? | Metawriting | Scoop.it

More and more we see social media and other application sites on the Internet providing single sign-on (SSO) as a feature or service to their visitors.

 

I’m sure you’ve visited a site and seen an invitation to logon using your Facebook or Google+ credentials. Many times, these sites also encourage you to share articles to Facebook, Google, or other sites. Amazon recently joined this trend and announced Login with Amazon for their customers to use.

 

You undoubtedly enjoy the convenience of SSO. After all, it reduces the number of different accounts and passwords that you must remember, and that’s a good thing. Right?

 

Well, it’s not quite that simple. Any time a company offers you a SSO service, remember that their primary motivation is to find some way to monetize their relationship with you, the consumer.

 


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Which tech companies are looking out for your privacy?

Which tech companies are looking out for your privacy? | Metawriting | Scoop.it
The Electronic Freedom Foundation calls out Sonic.net for actively protecting personal data from the government, and Verizon, AT&T and Apple for, well, not.

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