Metawriting
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Metawriting
This collection reflects my interest in writing pedagogy, agency and efficacy, and teaching with technology -- as a rhetorician and researcher as well as writer, teacher of writers, and teacher of writing teachers.
Curated by Deanna Mascle
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Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice | #Blogs #Communication #ICT #eSkills 

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice | #Blogs #Communication #ICT #eSkills  | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice I hear nearly each day: Blogging, WHY and How and THEN I don't have THAT time to do it and WHY SHOULD I do it!? Well, a GOOD question anyway! I will try to explain... Anybody has a story to tell,…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 6, 2016 12:04 PM

Blogging: Is It Difficult!? I Guess Not At ALL! Follow My Advice I hear nearly each day: Blogging, WHY and How and THEN I don't have THAT time to do it and WHY SHOULD I do it!? Well, a GOOD question anyway! I will try to explain... Anybody has a story to tell,…

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging

 

 

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Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful

Why Sarcastic People Are More Successful | Metawriting | Scoop.it
"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!

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Deanna Mascle's insight:

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Kristin Elliott's curator insight, March 8, 2016 8:45 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 13, 2016 9:47 AM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 14, 2016 4:13 PM

"The highest form of intelligence."
The study, titledThe Highest Form of Intelligence: Sarcasm Increases Creativity Through Abstract Thinking for Both Expressers and Recipients, was conducted by a team of researchers from Harvard, Columbia, and Insead. The team tested the effects of sarcasm by having volunteers engage in a sincere, a sarcastic, or a neutral (control) exchange before completing a task designed to assess their creativity.

What did the researchers find? Sarcasm, it turns out, is a pretty good mental workout. "To create or decode sarcasm, both the expressers and recipients of sarcasm need to overcome the contradiction (i.e., psychological distance) between the literal and actual meanings of the sarcastic expressions. This is a process that activates and is facilitated by abstraction, which in turn promotes creative thinking," Harvard's Francesca Gino, who participated in the study, explained in the Harvard Gazette.

The result was "those in the sarcasm conditions subsequently performed better on creativity tasks than those in the sincere conditions or the control condition. This suggests that sarcasm has the potential to catalyze creativity in everyone," Adam Galinsky, another member of the research team, added. In short, sarcastic comments make your whole team more creative, so go ahead and let fly with the occasional snide-but-hilarious comment. Thanks, science!


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Less is More for Teachers (and Better for Students!)

Less is More for Teachers (and Better for Students!) | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Stepping back from a load-weary model to glimpse a new paradigm’s potential. SHIFT PARADIGM | by Mark E. Weston Conjure an image of a school. Visualize yourself entering a classroom. Students and a...

 

Follow Mark @ShiftParadigm on Twitter  ===> https://twitter.com/ShiftParadigm <===

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 28, 2015 10:03 AM

Stepping back from a load-weary model to glimpse a new paradigm’s potential. SHIFT PARADIGM | by Mark E. Weston Conjure an image of a school. Visualize yourself entering a classroom. Students and a...

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Blogging as a Curation Platform

Blogging as a Curation Platform | Metawriting | Scoop.it
I have written about curation before using Twitter as a Curation Tool and about the importance of helping our Students Becoming Curators of Information.  Sue Waters also just published a very compr...

 

Content curation requires more than just the selection of information. It’s the assembling, categorizing, commenting and presenting of the best content available.


Learn more:


http://blog.scoop.it/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation



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Mónica Silakowicz's curator insight, June 24, 2014 9:39 AM

Curar contenido es más que simplemente buscar y seleccionar información.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, July 26, 2014 7:45 AM

Blogging as a Curation Platform

John Poole's curator insight, July 28, 2014 6:03 AM

Founder of scoopIT

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The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy

The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Many teachers have added ‘digital literacy’ as number four on the list of literacies their students should have (or be working towards, in most cases). Reading, writing, and math are now followed by digital literacy. Obviously, depending on the grade level  you teach, your students will have different abilities in each of the four areas, …

 

BUT, as WE are using "Technology", let us ALSO learn about the basics of "Cyber Security", a MUST in a connected technology driven world:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/27/cyber-security-is-easy-get-the-right-reflexes/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 24, 2014 12:14 PM

The 8 Key Elements Of Digital Literacy...


Michael Millard's curator insight, May 25, 2014 1:56 PM

Klurigt för oss svenskar men ack så clever.

Ajo Monzó's curator insight, May 27, 2014 2:08 AM

Yes!!!!

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Curious learning | Learning with 'e's

Curious learning | Learning with 'e's | Metawriting | Scoop.it

The trick is not to rely on new technology. That doesn't necessarily impress younger students. The solution for engaging children and sustaining their curiosity is to engineer situations where they will be challenged, surprised and yes - kept in a constant state of suspense.


Sometimes it is as simple as changing the format of a lesson, or altering the layout of a classroom. Sometimes it is to introduce a new approach or problem where students need to take an alternative role. I often create chaos and uncertainty in my lessons. People are not comfortable with this, and will do anything to resolve it into something meaningful. The answer is always, always keep them guessing - and then send them out confused, if you have to.



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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:32 AM

The solution for engaging children and sustaining their curiosity is to engineer situations where they will be challenged, surprised and yes - kept in a constant state of suspense.

.


Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 5, 2014 9:22 PM

Aprendizaje curioso.

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Just-in-Time Teaching: An Interactive Engagement Pedagogy

Just-in-Time Teaching: An Interactive Engagement Pedagogy | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Suppose you are teaching an introductory biology course and your next lesson deals with genetics. You would like to prepare your students for the upcoming class by asking them to think about the topic...

 


The instructor is now ready to adjust the classroom activities or lesson flow, and improvise if necessary. The flow is pretty much predetermined, but the words used in class will arise from the student responses and, most importantly, will be influenced by the feedback from the live class.


Typically, the live class is shown a representative set of responses, and the authors of the responses are invited to comment and elaborate. The rest of the class is encouraged to challenge and suggest alternatives. Properly handled, this can be a teaching opportunity that goes beyond the course content.


Students have an opportunity to practice critical thinking and communication skills. The course content is enriched because the wording actually comes from the live class, which makes the lesson fresh and interesting to the students.


 


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Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, March 20, 2014 5:10 AM

I like the way the JiT is presented and arguments listed, I especially appreciate the guidelines to justifying such approach.

tom jackson's curator insight, March 21, 2014 8:07 AM

this method requires instructor time up front to read and evaluate student prior knowledge and understanding, but you'll get it back in less reteaching as you tailor instruction to an appropriate level, Engagement may be higher and improved outcomes

tom jackson's curator insight, March 21, 2014 8:07 AM

this method requires instructor time up front to read and evaluate student prior knowledge and understanding, but you'll get it back in less reteaching as you tailor instruction to an appropriate level, Engagement may be higher and improved outcomes

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24 Apps, Games, and Websites Teachers are Using in STEAM Classrooms

24 Apps, Games, and Websites Teachers are Using in STEAM Classrooms | Metawriting | Scoop.it
In February, we highlighted apps, games, and websites that support science, technology, engineering, art, and math learning (STEAM).

 

And we invited educators to write Field Notes telling us how technology supports their teaching in these subject areas. Of the many Field...


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20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Other Data: 20 Signs You’re Actually Making A Difference As A Teacher

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Trish Harris's curator insight, March 3, 2014 6:22 PM

some worthy comments on what to reflect on when data overwhelms... 

Siti Noraisha Mohamed Senin's curator insight, March 4, 2014 8:52 AM

Researchers at the University of Leicester have proven that students assign the most authority to teachers who care about them. If this is true, then you are demonstrating a wonderful principle: that respect comes from kind behavior.

Luís Cálix's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:44 PM

Este post não se relaciona diretamente com  os temas habitualmente aqui tratados mas conduz-nos a um importante momento de reflexão profisssional. Questões simples. Sê-lo-ão as respostas?

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Mindset | How can you change from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset?

Mindset | How can you change from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset? | Metawriting | Scoop.it

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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, February 18, 2014 12:56 PM

Carol Dwek's Mindset is based on a lot of research she has done over the years. It has applications throughout higher education. 

Parent Cortical Mass's curator insight, February 19, 2014 8:19 AM

nice set of links about Carol Dweck's Mindset Theory.  Every parent needs to know what Carol Dweck discovered in her research.  

Jaimee's curator insight, March 5, 2014 10:09 AM

So one who wants to make a change must have a positive outlook on new situations or task that they are not used to?

 

This article is about how one can gain or become a part of the group that is a growth mind set. You gain success or become a better person by following these changes. 

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Social Media 101: Is There a Place For Social Media in Classrooms? [Infographic]

Social Media 101: Is There a Place For Social Media in Classrooms? [Infographic] | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Constructive uses of social media in education is becoming an integral (and one might venture inevitable) part of the learning experience. Here’s a look at how so, at every stage of the game.

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ANA's curator insight, February 12, 2014 4:20 PM

The new learning experiences

Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, February 13, 2014 2:20 AM

If you can do it with paper why use a digital alternative? Because for some of students, it makes the difference between engagement and being switched off.  Of couse finding the activities that you just can't do with paper...that's the real power of a digital solution.

Jennifer Turner's curator insight, February 24, 2014 1:40 PM

Don't be afraid of social media when you can learn how to use it in your classroom.  This reasource is a great find for educators that may want to use social media but just do not know where to incorporate it.

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Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Think Pedagogy First, Technology Second

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Rachel Vartanian's curator insight, March 28, 2014 4:40 PM

EdTech is about education: student learning and outcomes. 

Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, August 18, 2014 8:33 PM

Primero la pedagogía, después la tecnología.

Stéphane Bataillard's curator insight, August 24, 2014 1:26 PM

A méditer...

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12 Most Striking Tendencies of Creative People

12 Most Striking Tendencies of Creative People | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Kim Phillips shares the 12 Most Striking Tendencies of Creative People.

 

Ever wonder what makes those wacky, creative types tick? How is it that some people seem to come up with all kinds of interesting, original work while the rest of us trudge along in our daily routines?

 

Creative people are different because they operate a little differently.



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K'Ailene M. McGlothen's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:13 PM

Interesting article celebrating the unique traits of creative people.

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, February 4, 2014 11:33 AM

good list!

Sharla Shults's curator insight, February 22, 2014 8:47 PM

The soul of creativity is...imagination!

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Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character 

Helping Kids Take Criticism Constructively (Even When It Isn't Constructive) | #GrowthMindset #Character  | Metawriting | Scoop.it
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 6, 2016 11:19 AM
In the best guide I’ve found to learning this skill, “Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well,” Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen of the Harvard Negotiation Project explain that feedback — both positive and negative — is challenging because it hits us in the vulnerable soft spot between our desire to grow and our deep need to be accepted and respected. The key to hearing feedback well, they argue, is to adopt what the psychologist and author Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” People with a growth mindset believe that effort and challenge make us better, stronger and smarter, while those with a “fixed mindset” believe that our inherent assets are static no matter what we do.

Not all of the criticism kids face is constructive. Some of it is born out of ulterior motives or dark intentions, but the good news is that a growth mindset can protect kids from this sort of feedback as well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Growth+Mindset

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, April 7, 2016 2:31 PM
Feedback is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about feedback can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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Start a Reading Revolution: Flip Your Class With Blogs | Blogging | eSkills

Start a Reading Revolution: Flip Your Class With Blogs | Blogging | eSkills | Metawriting | Scoop.it
By adding blogs to a flipped ELA class, teachers present literacy as a design challenge where words, images, and format serve to express students' ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/practice-using-blogs-for-home-work-to-get-ict-skills-and-creativity/

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/practice/

 

https://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/put-your-title-in-here/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 2, 2015 4:05 AM
By adding blogs to a flipped ELA class, teachers present literacy as a design challenge where words, images, and format serve to express students' ideas.


Learn more:


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/10/14/practice-using-blogs-for-home-work-to-get-ict-skills-and-creativity/


https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/practice/


https://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/put-your-title-in-here/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Blogging


Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, June 2, 2015 9:14 AM

A reading transformation can occur in your school much like it has in my classroom, replacing fear and dread with excitement and self-expression. Students will read if they choose the books. They will write with voice and clarity if they have the ability to express their thoughts. They can change from reluctant to inspired readers if it happens on their own terms. All you have to do is flip the experience, turning the practice of reading on its head by making them the creators of their own learning.

RESENTICE's curator insight, June 3, 2015 3:49 AM

Inverser sa classe avec des BLOGS

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Free Technology for Teachers: Try Using ThingLink to Create Visual Prompts for Blog Comments

Free Technology for Teachers: Try Using ThingLink to Create Visual Prompts for Blog Comments | Metawriting | Scoop.it

By using ThingLink in this way I can have students and more than just text comments in response to the visual prompt. To extend the activity I can have students look for YouTube videos and or websites that will help to explain answers to the questions generated by looking at the featured image. 


Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-tools-for-teaching-people-and-learners/?tag=ThingLink

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Thinglink-Course

 

 

 


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Comunicologos.com's curator insight, July 27, 2014 12:30 PM

Comunicación y Educación 3.0

Nicola Parkin's curator insight, July 28, 2014 7:36 PM

Thinglink is easy to set up. Use with low-stakes activity first to test for student usability issues

LeRay Allen's curator insight, July 29, 2014 2:12 PM

With today's school budget this site is a necessity for

my learners and its cost effective for my school.

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Comparison of Blogging Services for Teachers

Comparison of Blogging Services for Teachers | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Comparison of Blogging Services for Teachers...

 


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Frankie Roberts's curator insight, June 13, 2014 7:10 PM

Which one do you use and what do you like/dislike about it?

objectplace's curator insight, June 14, 2014 11:32 AM

legwork done here

Margarita Saucedo's curator insight, June 19, 2014 3:16 PM

Habilidades necesarias, sin lugar a dudas. Escoger la plataforma ayuda

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170 Ways To Use Word Clouds In Every Classroom

170 Ways To Use Word Clouds In Every Classroom | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Welcome to a post I always have  fun writing. Last year I attempted finding ways to use Word Clouds (Wordle) in education. When I concluded writing that post I was at 108 possible ways. More than a...

 

Gust MEES: I created the above "Wordle Logo" with "Word Clouds" as example. You may use it for non-commercial use by giving credit to my blog ===> http://gustmees.wordpress.com/ <===

 

Check the free service here:

 

http://www.wordle.net/

 


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Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, November 30, 2014 8:14 PM

Great ideas presented here! I have used Wordle before, but I had not thought of using it in the ways listed. Can't wait to try them.

Judy Doctoroff's curator insight, December 2, 2014 10:36 AM

Creating word clouds is always enjoyable  and engages students and teachers.

Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, August 10, 2015 4:50 AM

Gust MEES: I created the above "Wordle Logo" with "Word Clouds" as example. You may use it for non-commercial use by giving credit to my blog ===> http://gustmees.wordpress.com/ <===

 

Check the free service here:

 

http://www.wordle.net/

 

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To Advance Education, We Must First Reimagine Society

To Advance Education, We Must First Reimagine Society | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Why haven't education reform efforts amounted to much? Because they start with the wrong problem, says John Abbott, director of the 21st Century Learning Initiative. Overhauling the educational paradigm means replacing the metaphor — the concept of the world and its inhabitants as machine-like entities — that has shaped the education system, as well as many other aspects of our culture.

 

Creating “Collaborative Learning Communities”

“It is essential to view learning as a total community responsibility,” he says, and to expect no short cuts. Children need to be integrated, fully contributing members of the broader community, so they can feel useful and valued. (It is not just the children who need this, he adds; healthy communities also need children.)

.

On a practical level, the most powerful lever for change, Abbott says, is people coming together to “rethink the role of community in the learning process,” agreeing how to divide up responsibilities among professional teachers and other community members, and then launching small pilot projects that are true to their new vision. These efforts will build on each other, he says, and large-scale change will follow.


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june holley's curator insight, April 7, 2014 2:59 PM
Not just for people involved in education!
Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, April 11, 2014 1:32 PM

Educación y Sociedad

Bibiana Vargas's curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:05 PM

Overschooled and undereducated.  Love the statement. Thinking of borrowing it soon.

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Too Much Technology and Not Enough Learning?

Too Much Technology and Not Enough Learning? | Metawriting | Scoop.it

I was reading the book The Smartest Kids in the World by Amanda Ripley and couldn't help wondering what our schools would be like today if we were forced to teach without the technology (including co...

 


For example, we have all experienced the "app" mania and are sick of hearing, "Is there an app for that?"


Here is a new distraction: why don't we encourage students to use valuable time for "learning" through social media?


After all, they already spend hours of their time on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and myriads of other social media sites.



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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:00 PM


A MUST READ!!!


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/03/05/often-asked-questions-are-there-cyber-security-dangers-with-apps-and-whats-about-privacy/


Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, March 19, 2014 8:43 AM

¿Demasiada tecnología para tan poco aprendizaje ...?

Sue Alexander's curator insight, March 20, 2014 10:38 AM

Comment section is as interesting (and perhaps even more enlightening) than the article. A good read.

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Using a Question Building Chart to Provoke Student Thought

Using a Question Building Chart to Provoke Student Thought | Metawriting | Scoop.it
One of the most effective ways to provoke student thought is through the building of “rich” questions. By asking meaningful questions - and interacting with textual information – students can come to an understanding that builds upon on their own personal experiences and opinions. Through the use of a template, questions can be created in any way that you want and provide you with a specific platform to begin your questioning focus.



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ANA's curator insight, March 7, 2014 5:45 AM

Important from the very beginning to create critical thinking

smadar yona's curator insight, March 8, 2014 10:12 AM

ללמד איך ללמוד, חשוב מאוד בים המידע.

מעניין

סמדר

Audrey's curator insight, April 13, 2014 4:21 AM

The questions can be based on exam questions, or directly from past exam questions.  The students can be asked about their own experiences and say whether the textual information has any application to the society in which they live, e.g. How does the information help us?

curating for www.homeschoolsource.co.uk and

www.hotmoodle.com

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Create Online Presentations with responsive Design

Create Online Presentations with responsive Design | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Responsive User Interface within Presenter allows you to create Online Presentations and infographics easier and faster than before right in your browser.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:39 PM


Learn about on How-To create websites who are adapting to different screen resolutions, great tutorial...


Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:48 AM

Creative presentations for all.  

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Promoting a Culture of Learning

Promoting a Culture of Learning | Metawriting | Scoop.it
Learning is a culture.

It starts as a culture with the students as human beings needing to understand their environment. And it ends as a culture with students taking what we give them and using it

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Siti Noraisha Mohamed Senin's curator insight, February 18, 2014 11:02 PM

Create the culture of learning by giving room for students to apply what they have learnt without the fear of failing. Even when they do fail, instill in them the motivation to rise up once again. 

Kelly Craig's curator insight, February 20, 2014 10:11 AM

"Show them - Help them - Let them"

smadar yona's curator insight, February 25, 2014 3:37 PM

על זה בדיוק דברתי בשבוע שעבר,

זה מתחיל ביצירת תרבות למידה בין מורה לתלמיד פנים אל פנים מתוך אינטראקציה בינאישית וזה ממשיך לתהליכי למידה הוראה בשילוב דיגיטליות

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The Global Teacher

The Global Teacher | Metawriting | Scoop.it

Global teachers (should) care about education as a whole, as well as their school and their classroom.  I just want to iterate that if the person only looks at sharing and learning globally, but cannot connect with those in their classroom or school, I would not consider them a “global teacher”.  

They just know that we are better when we work together, not just taking, but contributing.  They know what they share makes a difference for others, as well as knowing what they learn from others makes a difference for their school and students.

So where are you on the spectrum, and what type of teacher would you want in your school?

 
 
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 8, 2014 5:55 PM

This does not require a comment. I just want to curate it for future reference.

ANA's curator insight, February 9, 2014 7:00 AM

We live in a global world, so we need global teachers

James Jandebeur's curator insight, February 9, 2014 12:57 PM

With an interconnected world, we need to take people outside our immediate circles into account. Hence, this is a good discussion to have for pretty much anyone with Internet access, not just teachers, but teachers are a good place to start.

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Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens | Metawriting | Scoop.it

In working with students, critical thinking encourages and promotes:

Humility to accept criteria that is not their own.Courage to defend their own criteria against others.Responsibility to contrast and take into account the appropriate information.Commitment to filtering out and separating valid from useless information.Respect for the group and for the individual when the time comes for debate and contrasting ideas.

To educate an individual in critical thinking is to educate him or her to be capable of governing or controlling their own personal and professional life and to be able to find answers and solutions to problems. It is the road to forming critical and responsible citizens who are capable of confronting the challenges of the future.

 


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Andrrey Yatsenko's curator insight, February 4, 2014 9:12 AM

How  educate  an  individual  in  critical  thinking  for  student .

Luís Cálix's curator insight, February 6, 2014 3:15 PM

Excelente reflexão sobre a importância do Pensamento Crítico para a educação de cidadãos competentes. O que ele implica e o que promove.

Sharla Shults's curator insight, February 22, 2014 8:45 PM

So many students simply want the answer...no thinking involved, the easy way. We are doing our youth a tremendous injustice not emphasizing both the metacognitive and critical thinking processes. They need to be able to explore a problem, then analyze, explain, and evaluate it in order to survive as adults.