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I Am Malala

I Am Malala | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
I come from a country that was created at midnight. When I almost died it was just after midday. When the Taliban took control of the Sw...
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The book I Am Malala is a story about a young girl named Malala Yousafzai who stood up for education rights for women in Pakistan and was shot by the Taliban. The story begins with Malala telling how when she was born she was hidden away by her family. In Pakistan, when a daughter is born her birth is not celebrated she is kept away and taught to cook and clean for her family for the rest of her life. Malala knew from the beginning that she did not want to be like other girls. She wanted to make something of her life and to not be kept hidden from the world. Education for Malala was her number one priority; she wanted to have an education to have a better future for herself. When Malala was about 7 her and her family was driven out of her village Marden because American troops were moving into Pakistan because of the threat of the 200 nuclear warheads and who was going to control them. The Taliban were in control, which meant women were not allowed to attended school. Malala was so upset that women had their education rights taken away; she knew she had to do something to change this. On February 15 that’s when Malala made her voice be heard and returned to her hometown Mingora, (at only age 15) she spoke about how schools in her area have been banned and destroyed by the Taliban and that women should take back their education rights again. Her speech was recorded on Capital Talk for all to hear. Her voice was heard. A few months later while riding the school bus, the bus was stopped and a Taliban member pointed a gunpoint straight blank to Malala’s head. This story continues with her journey to recovery and her continue fight for women education in Pakistan. Malala’s story spread like wildfire, because of her bravery and her strength Malala was nominated for a noble bell peace prize. This story is defiantly empowering and true.

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Pakistan

Pakistan | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
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Pakistan is a great country, especially the beautiful Swat Valley. I would wait though to travel to Pakistan in today’s society. Some of the areas of Pakistan are not quite ready to be visited by tourists yet. Some government issues still have to be resolved in the country. That doesn’t mean you should look down on the country Pakistan, the people there strong and true. This country will soon be ready to accept visitors in a matter of time.

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Pakistan—Human Rights

Pakistan—Human Rights | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
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The article Pakistan-Human Rights connects to the book I am Malala because it discuses about human rights in Pakistan and how women rights is a violation of human rights all together. This article explains women rights, children rights, and religious minorities in Pakistan, and how they all tie together with human rights. About 80 to 90 percent of women in Pakistan encounter domestic violence in Pakistan, according to the HRCP (Human Rights Commission of Pakistan). Also the U.S State Departments states that Pakistan is a major country that participates in women trafficking. The ones who also have their human rights violated are children. Children from poor families are treated very harshly; children are frequently kidnapped or sold into slavery, or prostitution by their parents. The last groups that have their human rights violated are religious minorities. The article states that the punishments for breaking the laws (such as disrespecting ones religion and beliefs) were used to persecute non-Muslims. Many people have been sentenced to death for speaking out against ones religion. Many human-rights groups are seeking to change these three big violations in Pakistan.

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Iraq: The Women's Story - YouTube

A compelling account of a life inside Iraq that is rarely seen on news bulletins: stories of ordinary women whose struggle to survive has only worsened since...
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The documentary Iraq: The Women’s Story is an investigation of life of the Iraqi woman. Cameras film for three months following the lives of women and their families in Iraq and seeing what conditions they live in and the daily struggles they must fight. Traveling anywhere in Iraq is dangerous. Shootings happen often in the streets, between American troops and Iraqi fighters. American troops bombed so many homes, schools and hospitals that about 8,000 families were forced to leave and join other refugee camps. In the film a women doctor is interviewed. She says that women doctors of Iraq are real fighters. She also states that Women can only we treated by women doctors but it has become very difficult to do that because so many women are becoming illiterate from the many schools being bombed or closed down. This film also shows many of the conditions that families live in. Families live in ruins of buildings, half of the Iraqi population has become unemployed so they can no longer support their families. Many girls in Iraq are no longer to participate in sports anymore. A group of girls were interviewed in this film and they said that they felt threaten by others to not play sports and are pressured to wear their headscarf. Parents worry that girls practicing sports draws attention to the girls, making them a target. Through out this film the women of Iraq must live in fear of others and the fear for their family, the daily struggle for them is real.

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Pakistani Refugees Escape Army Offensive - and Taliban Rule

Pakistani Refugees Escape Army Offensive - and Taliban Rule | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
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The article Pakistani Refugees Escape Army Offensive - and Taliban Rule tells what life was like living in refugee camps in Pakistan for a boy named Pakhtoon Kamar and what it was like being under Taliban rule. Pakhtoon and his family were caught in the crossfire between security forces of Pakistan and the Taliban. His home Swat Valley was no becoming a battlefield. He tells how in one week 360,000 refuges ended up in camps. HE states life under Taliban rule aliened the people of Pakistan. The Taliban started preaching on FM radios, they begun asking for money by pressuring women to turn in their gold jewelry. Public punishments were also another factor that the people of Pakistan feared of under Taliban rule. Pakhtoon says that often there would be 15 to 20 public lashing in the square. He also says that Taliban members would do this whenever they felt like it. His sisters and mother were restricted from leaving their home and then soon banned from being allowed in public at all. This article definitely mirrors a little with Malala’s story. Both of them and their family have had to live in fear of the Taliban rule.

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The Fight for Education Rights

The Fight for Education Rights | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
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This is a young girl from Afghanistan who got acid thrown on her face by two Taliban men. Her name is Shamsia Husseini. One day, Shamsia was walking to school as a protest to the banned of women education in Afghanistan. All of a sudden two men ripped off her scarf and threw acid on her face. She is one of the many women who have suffered from the violence of the Taliban for fighting for women education. You can read more about her story in the article below.

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Don't Abandon Afghan Women

Don't Abandon Afghan Women | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
Anna Messmore's insight:

The article Don't Abandon Afghan Women tells what life is like for the women of Afghanistan under Taliban rule. This article mentions how (after the Taliban banned education for girls) a young girl named Shamsia Husseini living in Kandahar was walking to school and a man wearing a mask ripped of her veil and sprayed acid across her face. She sates in the article how she wanted to make a statement on how much education means to women and how women can do so much more than just say at home all the time. This article also states that in Afghanistan the deaths of women and children increased 38 percent; the reason for this is the Taliban have been violently targeting women. Form this article the women of Afghanistan do not want to be silenced no matter the consequences should be. Girls from the school that Shamsia Husseini went to protested by pitching tents outside in front of the school. The school could not accommodate the girls who wanted to continue their studies, but the school was still under Taliban rule. Even though these girls are from a different country, they share the same struggles as the women of Pakistan did.

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The Malala Fund

The Malala Fund | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
Anna Messmore's insight:

This organization is called the Malala Fund. This organization was actually created by the same girl in the story I Am Malala; her story is the reason why this program is existing. What this organization does is it helps raise money for girls al over the world that has had their education taken away from them. Weather their education was denied by economic, social, political and legal factors the Malala Fund will help girls get the education they deserve. You can even to donate to this organization to support education all over the world. With the impact of this organization girls are given a voice, and able to open new doors for their future. This organization is proof that Malala’s story has impacted the world. Now she is doing her part in helping other girls in having their voices be heard and standing up for women education rights.

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Blue Veins

Blue Veins | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
Blue Veins is a rationalist women organization born out of a need for information, activism and grass root organizing towards the empowerment of women. Today Blue Veins works to empower women and
Anna Messmore's insight:

The Blue Veins organization works to help to improve the equality for women across the country. The mission statement for this organization is to work hard by creating a society to improve the quality of life across the world for children and women. By doing this they are spreading awareness, action and advocacy. This organization will also help women and girls from being silenced by overcoming the barrier and having a voice. The Blue Veins organization has a project called the Accelerating Collective Action for Women Empowerment project. This project is to help raise awareness of human right violations in Pakistan and south Asia. The project has reached out to many networking cites, private shelters, and help lines to spread the news of this project and what others can do to help the people of Pakistan and South Asia. Even though you cannot donate to this program, your can help spread the word by connecting with Blue Veins organization on Facebook.

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Three Cups of Tea

Three Cups of Tea | Messmore Pakistan | Scoop.it
Anyone who despairs of the individual’s power to change lives has to read the story of Greg Mortenson, a homeless mountaineer who, follow...
Anna Messmore's insight:

The book "Three Cups of Tea" is a great read if you want to learn more about education rights in Pakistan. This story definitely values the idea of children all over of getting a proper education, especially girls. So if you want to read a story about the fight for education for children you should read “Three Cups of Tea”.

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