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Rescooped by abigail from Mixed American Life
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Review: The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing

Review: The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing | ancient history | Scoop.it

In summary, this book does an excellent job at getting readers to revisit their own perceptions of race, whether they consider themselves mixed race or not. The categorization and labels that we use to describe us have a confusing and sometimes bright,sometimes painful history that we need to share in order to have a brighter future. You will need your “thinking cap” on because the book uses college-level vocabulary and historical anecdotes, but your mind will be blown away by the complexity behind even the simplest answers involving identity, love, and society.


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abigail's insight:

over time many men have understood that America is made by all types of men and by all races and ethnicities. they have formed a great part in americas history both early and old history.

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Pont du Gard - Wikipedia

Pont du Gard

The Pont du Gard (literally: Gard Bridge) is an ancient Roman aqueduct bridge that crosses the Gardon River in Vers-Pont-du-Gard near Remoulins, in the Gard département of southern France. It is part of the Nîmes aqueduct, a 50 km-long (31 mi) structure built by the Romans to carry water from a spring at Uzès to the Roman colony of Nemausus ( Nîmes).

The Pont du Gard is a notable ancient Roman aqueduct bridge that crosses the Gard River in southern France. It is part of a 50 km (31 mi) long aqueduct that runs between Uzès and Nîmes in the South of France. It is located in Vers-Pont-du-Gardnear Remoulins, in the Gard département. The aqueduct was constructed by the Romans in the 1st century AD and was added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites in 1985. It is the highest of all Roman aqueduct bridges and is the best preserved after the Aqueduct of Segovia.

The bridge has three rows of arches, standing 48.8 m (160 ft) high, and formerly carried an estimated 200 million liters(44 million gallons) of water a day to the fountains, baths and homes of the citizens of Nîmes. The aqueduct descends in height by only 17 m (56 ft) over its entire length, indicative of the great precision that Roman engineers were able to achieve using only simple technology. It was possibly used until as late as the 9th century, well after the fall of Rome.


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this bridge is proof for todays time to show the advancement ancient civilizations had before us. all our new technology is the only advancement we have because the took all the trouble of figuring how things worked.

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